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Offline DL

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2007, 10:39:14 PM »
The nursing gates/contraptions are really useful for all sorts of things if your cattle are calm - they basically clip or bolt to a panel - you can catch the head and you can set it up so you can pull a rope from the far end as you swing the gate. I have one that swings in to the right and one to the left but you can also use them sort of  backwards - just push the cow up against another gate - also very useful for the big old cows that when pregnant won't fit in my chute (actually they would fit in the chute they just can't get there with the current set up) The picture is the front of the contraption,on the picture of the frame you can see the nursing gate to the left - it doesnt take up much space and is very useful - you may be able to see where it splits in half and can be lifted up and held in place with pins for nursing a  calf, milking out a cow and some foot work....thats all - I love my barn!
« Last Edit: July 09, 2007, 10:54:04 PM by dragon lady »
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Offline ROAD WARRIOR

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2007, 10:56:32 PM »
DL - I will be building about 100 yards from my nearest boundary, that being the road. Looks like River Road got into your pocket a little, excellent gates though. I liked alot of your set up except maybe in front of the chute. This is the second one that I have built and I am thinking of putting a sale facility in this one. I agree you can never have too much electricity or water (in the right places!) My rule of thumb on electricity is triple what you think you may need, it doesn't take long to run out of outlets when you start plugging in fans, blowers, clippers,scales etc etc. My feed room will need to be fairly large as I house 2 roller mills, an electric feed mixer, feed cooker as well as the various feed ingrediants (Mix feed twice a day). I am thinking 14' side walls on the outside structure with sliding doors on the east and west ends. Keep the ideas coming about what you have done and what you would change - I hope this will be the last one I build so I am putting alot of thought into it.
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Offline red

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Re: planning for a barn
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2007, 05:28:33 AM »
i am thinking about building a new barn. we used to use lean-tos. but i moved.

i live in southwest,ks so hot in the summer cold in the winter.i have about 11 acres that i can put it on.

i will be breakin about 12 calves that i raise every year in the winter. and then about 4-6 in the summer. i  get bagged feed in loads of 2-3 tons each time. so i will need some place and then small square bales.  i would like a wash rack. a tie rack, stalls, and then turn out pens . any one have ideas on how big and how to set it up. thanks in advance

Pigguy- I combined these topics since there were some good ideas in the first thread.

Red
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Offline DL

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2007, 09:29:19 AM »
DL - I will be building about 100 yards from my nearest boundary, that being the road. Looks like River Road got into your pocket a little, excellent gates though. I liked alot of your set up except maybe in front of the chute. This is the second one that I have built and I am thinking of putting a sale facility in this one. I agree you can never have too much electricity or water (in the right places!) My rule of thumb on electricity is triple what you think you may need, it doesn't take long to run out of outlets when you start plugging in fans, blowers, clippers,scales etc etc. My feed room will need to be fairly large as I house 2 roller mills, an electric feed mixer, feed cooker as well as the various feed ingrediants (Mix feed twice a day). I am thinking 14' side walls on the outside structure with sliding doors on the east and west ends. Keep the ideas coming about what you have done and what you would change - I hope this will be the last one I build so I am putting alot of thought into it.

Hey RW - it wasn't River Road - we have a local guy who makes them - started as a FFA project for his son- so I could get custom everything. I am not 100% thrilled with the chute either but haven't been able to come up with a better option - it is at a bit of an angle so the cows have to make a little turn, but there is a palpation cage and a slide gate so I can  line up 3 (not the big cows) and run them thru at a time - I don't hink it would work ideally for many cattle as cows don't really like the idea of going sideways - but I train them as youngsters and have no trouble getting them to go in.

I also wish I had a different place for the scales and in a perfect world it would be separate from the chute...does need cement so still thinking...sounds like you should have a lot of fun!

Another thought - guys aren't always good about picking up nails - they make big magnets on wheels - I got one when a place went out of business...it was a real good investment - dl
« Last Edit: July 10, 2007, 12:27:24 PM by dragon lady »
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Offline ROAD WARRIOR

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2007, 11:07:48 AM »
I took a magnet out of an old grinder/mixer and mounted it on an old push mower frame. It's about 24" long and 8" wide and is a really strong magnet. Works really good for nails, screws and small pieces of scrap iron. I'm always building or modifying something to fit my needs (besides that I'm cheap). It works really good to pick up behind me. The gates sure look alot like river roads but I'm guessing the price was better!
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Offline DL

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2007, 12:26:50 PM »
You are a clever fellow!
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Offline maine12

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2007, 12:30:31 PM »
hey red can i get more pictuers of your barn.

i am thinking a 50x50 barn. with a 38 foot tie out on the west side,  on the north wall 3 10x12 stalls, a 10x10 place for hay, a 10x10 place for the showboxes, on the east wall a 10x10 sliding door , a 18 foot feed stroage,and then  on the south wall 2 10x12 stalls and a 10x12 washout, and then a 10x10 sliding door.

what do you think would be the best fans. that i can use in the barn and still take them to shows.
We used to have money....Now we show cattle.

Offline knabe

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #22 on: July 10, 2007, 12:46:43 PM »
this is probably a minor point depending on what the interior structure is, but if you make 12 foot increments, its easier for plywood and other lumber so you won't have so many shorts left over.  10 foot lumber is not common out here.  if you do 12 foot center to center, there is a few inches left over after you trim, especially if you use 6x6 posts.  plywood is obviously in 4 foot increments.  you could use a four footer and split it obviously.  the "standard" for horses is 12x12 stalls.  also, 10x10 is not very big for hay.  also on the door, consider what height is convenient to move hay into the barn.  you probably won't move a stack of 96, but they are pretty common out here.  my neighbor has a barn with the hay section so she can put three stacks of 96.  i move hay way too much and i'm not  that much stronger than dl.   whatever size you make, make it expandable.  also, install a mister and a room with a low ceiling for a cold room, vents on top,(hot air rises).

Offline maine12

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2007, 01:14:01 PM »
the reason i only have a 10x10 hay spot is becasue we already have a building for hay storage. i was going to make it all low ceilings. so i could cool it easier.
We used to have money....Now we show cattle.

Offline red

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #24 on: July 10, 2007, 01:15:34 PM »
Pigguy- what do you need to see?

I like the Sullivan's Turbo fans. We have the barn fans hanging plus the big stationary fan on the ground which we can move as needed. I take the smaller 20" fans to shows.

Red
"People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care"
" Some succeed because they are destined to,
but most succeed because they are determined to."
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Offline DL

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #25 on: July 10, 2007, 01:48:59 PM »
the reason i only have a 10x10 hay spot is becasue we already have a building for hay storage. i was going to make it all low ceilings. so i could cool it easier.

Maybe the engineers among us can respond to this but unless you are cooling a short ceiling room I think it becomes oven like in the heat - with high ceilings the heat rises way way above the cattle, with low ceilings and tall cattle you can cook on the hoof (lol)
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Offline ROAD WARRIOR

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #26 on: July 10, 2007, 03:51:39 PM »
Unless you insulate and use a refridgeration unit, I wouldn't go with low ceilings. As DL said heat rises and needs to be dispersed not contained. As far a barn fans go - I mount squirrel cage fans permanently in the barn. They are usually cheap at farm actions, move a ton of air and I can keep my show fans in the tack room out of the dirt and not burn up the motors.
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Offline NHR

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #27 on: July 10, 2007, 04:48:54 PM »
Here is the philosophy on high ceilings versus low ceilings.

Back in the day all homes/buildings were built with high enterior ceilings because heat naturally rises because heated air is lighter (think hot air balloon). When air conditioners became available ceiling heights began to shrink (bad idea). Since this is the case a taller ceiling will help let the heat rise, so make sure the ceiling is high enough to keep the heat above the cattle, just as important is to allow the heat out of the top of the barn. By creating an escape for the heat natural airflow occurs. you can actually create airflow through the barn with open sides and open ridge vent which is how we built our barn down here in Texas. We are in the process of designing a new barn and I will take what I have learned on the old barn and hopefully improve it.

If you want a good example of heat try this, duct tape all your eaves vents on your house attic and then see how high your electric bill will get in the summer. Plus during the winter you get the added benfit of moisture in your home if you forget to take the tape off.

The best scenario would be to install an exhaust fan in the ceiling attached to a thermostat so you can control how and when it will come on. Creating airflow in your barn will help keep your animals from getting ill.

Our high school ag barn has tall ceilings but no vents for the hot air to escape so it is miserable in it. We have shorter ceilings in our barn but have a way for hot air to escape so it is significantly cooler.


"Fine Print"
The above statement is only from experiences and should not be taken for exact engineering guidelines. Not responsible for spelling or grammar mistakes (I'm from Texas). By reading this you agree you have to much time on your hands.


« Last Edit: July 10, 2007, 04:53:12 PM by NHR »
"Fine Print"
The above statement is only from experiences and should not be taken for exact guidelines. Not responsible for spelling or grammar mistakes (I'm from Texas). Not responsible for any accidents or stupid stuff. By reading this you agree you have to much time on your hands.

Offline sawboss

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #28 on: July 11, 2007, 07:58:55 AM »
I use permanent mounted Sullivan Turbo Fan over each 8'x16' pen, then I have a 16" Porta Cool Fan that blows across all four pens.  I like the water cool fan because it does not blow a mist.  You can take it to shows, weighs 80 lbs., all you need is 110 volt outlet and water faucet.  If water is not available they make a portable stand with water reservoir.  This little unit will drop the air temp by 20 degrees over a 600 square foot area.  This is probably the best investment I have made!  Fan cost without stand $750, with stand and 50 gallon reservoir $1030.  Look on their website for models and options.  I bought mine through Tractor Supply Co. they gave me the best deal.  They are made in Center, Tx. 40 miles from my house, but will not sell direct.  A great product, it is the unit you see on the sidelines of NFL, NCAA and High School football games.
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Offline afhm

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Re: building a new barn
« Reply #29 on: July 11, 2007, 01:19:47 PM »
Best thing to do is take a road trip a look at other peoples facilities.  Take pictures  and notes, ask them why  they did this ir that and what they would do different.  Then take what you like about each place  and put them together for your barn.  The main things I suggest is if you think you have enough electricity, you don't.  You can put in double what you think you need and still come up short at times.  Also don't get land locked so to speak, position the barn where you can add on to it when you decide its not big enough (always just a matter of time).

 

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