Steer Planet - Show Steers and Club Calves Forum

Steer Planet Chat => Hall of Fame => Topic started by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 09, 2007, 08:19:25 PM

Title: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 09, 2007, 08:19:25 PM
I am in the planning stage of building a new barn. As our life "revolves" around the barn I want to make it as functional as possible. Efficient use of space is a must, working facility under roof, washrack, office, feed room, square bale storage, tack room - you get the idea. I haven't won the lottery so we have to keep a budget in mind. Any suggestions or ideas?
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 09, 2007, 08:23:43 PM
we put up corrugated walls/cork so we can hang things on the walls. Keeps it off the ground & makes it neater. Also a sealed feed room that is rodent proof is good
Plenty of drainage also
Make it so there is a good breeze way through. It's amazing how that can cool a barn down

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: chambero on July 09, 2007, 08:37:03 PM
Are you looking for fancy or functional?

There is no better, cheaper dry storage that is rodent proof than a sea cargo container.  A 40 footer will run you between $2500-$3500.  Folks down here are starting to incorporate them into barns.

We built a new show barn about two years ago.  Cost me around $15K not counting tin (we already had it from a building we had "deconstructed).  A few lessons-learned:

We turn out calves at night into large (1 acre+) pens with grass or hay.  We built 10x12 stalls.  I still think that is a perfect size. 

My washrack is 10x22.  10' is not wide enough.  I wish it was 12' wide to allow plenty of room to walk behind a big steer tied up to the rail.

I like a high roof with completely open sides to allow air movement.

If you have pens on both sides of an aisle, make your gates big enough that you can open them and fasten them together to make giant pens.  This is great for keeping cow/calf pairs in immediately after calving it you want them out of the weather.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 09, 2007, 08:45:04 PM
Keep in mind that although the summers here get very hot (90+ degrees, over 100 at times) we still have below zero temperatures in the winter. Don't need to have a palace but still needs to look nice as most of our customers come to the barn to buy cattle.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: cowz on July 09, 2007, 08:57:39 PM
Don't scrimp on the concrete or door work.  That is where the mice get in.  We have been fighting mice since my new doors don't seal up to my "Scottish" concrete work.  Learn from my mistake!!

I have to agree with Chambero....the washrack is a must!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: chambero on July 09, 2007, 08:59:25 PM
What part of the country are you from?

There are some very nice looking barns made with the cargo containers.  There is a place in Wichita Falls, TX called Waters Ag Storage that sells lots of them for that purpose.  You could get a brochure sent to you.  The only reason I know anything about it is I'm about to buy one for stand alone a storage building.  I saw some cool photos of some barns built with them.

http://www.watersagstorage.com/index.html

I don't see any photos of the barns on their website. 

Our bad cold spells are infrequent enough that we don't have to worry about the open sides on the south, west, and east.  We do have about half of our north side closed in with sliding doors on the rest.  

We have ready access to pipe from oil fields, so we build everything out of metal.  My barn is made out of pipe and sucker rods.

I still think it would be a good topic to post pictures of our barns.  I'll get around to taking some one of these days.  
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 09, 2007, 09:02:09 PM
Great idea Chambero! I'll get some when I do chores tonight.

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 09, 2007, 09:51:40 PM
First set of pictures is our cow barn. We have the gates set up so 2 people can easily handle the cows when treating them. Hubby built many of the gates you see. Have plenty of room for hay & straw. Note the colors are scarlet & gray!!!

The second picture is of my calf barn. Biggest mistake is no indoor washrack. It's just outside. a royal pain in the winter. The feed bin was built by the hubby & can hold 500 pounds of feed. We also have a squeeze chute so we can work w/ the calves if needed.

Notice the blue Heeler has to be in all pictures!

Red (dog)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: knabe on July 09, 2007, 10:04:11 PM
for lots of great ideas, check out this dudes website. 

http://www.pecorfamily.com/2005_08_01_archive.html


put gutters on barns, and bury the pipe and have an exit way away from barn.  i have stalls where the panels between stalls can be easily removed.  lots of electricity with sockets up high to keep cords off ground.  get sliding doors.  i installed stupid dutch doors on the outside cuz i thought they looked neat.  horse, cows, stick their head out and push on the doors.  totally hate them.  sliders on the inside from md barns  http://www.mdent.com/catalogD.aspx?Catalogid=9  you can see that the latch is one of the verical pipes.  i bought these and had them install two extra hangers on the rail system for added strength.  incorporate wash rack drainage with gutter system on roof.  install 220 and lots of sockets and an electricity panel with room for expansion.  two sources of water in case one goes out.  mine is insulated on the south side.  all eaves are open so ventilation is not much of a problem.

be careful of pipe corrals for stalls.  my neighbor just put down a two month foal who got both her legs through the piping.  sad.

consider covered geotextile fabric on top of rocks for high travel areas so they don't get muddy.  they work great in soils with high clay.

easy access to manure handling.  have room to pivot in the tack room when piddling with your saddle. 

you will never have enough stalls, so be very careful about making the tack room, office too big.  in the hay room cement it to sweep up the fines minus dirt instead of wasting it.  make sure tack room has good ventilation.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 09, 2007, 10:56:58 PM
When I bought the farm (not literally, to some peoples dismay ;D) it had a 95 foot by 40 foot barn (set up for horses) - the left half was concrete (still is) with garage doors - the right was dug down some, with a loft on both sides and a center isle - well believe me a possessed woman and a skid steer can sure remove pens...that is now where the office and chute are as well as isle in and out and the horse has his own place - clearly I needed something more

I built a 90 by 60 building that comes into the old barn at a right angle - it goes east west and has NO walls (yes, true I live in Michigan and some people thought I was nuts). There is a wall on the west with a huge slider (our prevailing wind is south west and it is wicked) - there is also a 16 foot overhand on the south (hope that gives you a visual - it does me but of course I live it)

I put in no center posts - basically the barn without the overhang had 6x6 posts every 12 feet - so the inside was basically empty. Adding the overhang added additional 6x6 posts 12 feet apart - I had gates made for just about every 12 x 12 space. Then I had to add 2 6x6 internally to use to anchor these metal frames that basically hook together to form pens and do not require any additional posts - all the gates and panels and gizmos can be removed by removing a pin (easier said than done if you are a 90 lb weakling) and can therefore be reconfigured or turned around. I started with 4 pens on the left and added as the need and the money permitted - I have one more permanent pen (40 x40) that is right at the entrance of the old barn, but basically everything else can be wiggled and opened or closed for a huge number of different configurations depending on the need - if I figure this right I can have 14 12 x 12 pens at one time or any number of 12 x24, 12 x 36, etc. I can get cattle in from just about anywhere and I have 2 pens with "nursing panels" which are basically a combo little head gate and gate which half lifts up (I need to take pictures - I can see all this, you all probably can't  ;D)

Try to figure out how you will use the barn, how the traffic will flow, where will cows be that might need water, how much light do you need in your calving pens etc draw it out. I have reversed a lot of gates, added 2 waterers and one more hydrant (that gives me 4) - I hate hauling water - I hate frozen hoses!

Here are my thoughts
1) Walls are greatly overrated - and lack of walls gives great ventilation esp in weather like we are having now - 98 with high humidity; In the winter I put up panels (with little gizmos that fit over the gates) of plywood or tarps (4 or 5 foot high) - that keeps the calves out of the wind - there is about one day a year or 2 I wish I had walls - when there is a blizzard and the wind is whipping in circles - barn gets full of snow (more straw fixes the issue)
2) For maximum flexability stay away from anything permanent - I have 3 orange Souix gates on the 40 x 40 pen - that was a mistake (I don't like them either!)
3) When you put in your lines (electric and water) put in more light sockets and plugs  than you ever thought you wanted - no matter how many you put in or where - you always want more and in a different place. If you intend to put in mercury lights but don't want to buy them now - run the lines.
4) Water - figure out where you might want automatic waterers and put the lines in for them - it is easier to just add the waterer when you get it that to re dig
5) Hydrants - you can never have too many -
6) Gates - I would pick gates instead of non swing panels in most cases. Depending on where you are there may be someone who makes gates - in the past my custom gates were no more expensive than the Souix gates - however the price of steel and diesel etc has increased and likely they will too.
7) Big vent in the roof top
8) IMHO concrete is greatly overrated and not good for cattle feet - yes there are probably some areas that need it but I don't keep my cows on concrete - every year after I clean out the barn I add more bedding sand - it is cool in the summer and drains well with straw on top in the winter
9) separate electrical panel for the barn
10) gutters - big gutters with underground drainage - hide the gutters from the cows they like to squish them

What do I wish I had done differently
1) water shut off in the barn - when the Ritchie waterer went bezerk running back and forth in the house into the basement to turn off and on the water was a real pain (and made a huge mess)
2) my 2 barns are not physically connected - there is a half foot space - this is a wet pain sometimes
3) more waterers
4) investigate geofabric (not sure that is the name) for the low side of the barn (south)

I am sure there is more, I'll try to get picutres

2)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: kanshow on July 09, 2007, 11:02:53 PM
THis is a great topic.   I'd love to see more pictures.     
Title: planning for a barn
Post by: maine12 on July 09, 2007, 11:30:25 PM
i am thinking about building a new barn. we used to use lean-tos. but i moved.

i live in southwest,ks so hot in the summer cold in the winter.i have about 11 acres that i can put it on.

i will be breakin about 12 calves that i raise every year in the winter. and then about 4-6 in the summer. i  get bagged feed in loads of 2-3 tons each time. so i will need some place and then small square bales.  i would like a wash rack. a tie rack, stalls, and then turn out pens . any one have ideas on how big and how to set it up. thanks in advance
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 10, 2007, 02:35:20 AM
OK - here we go
The old barn had 3 long garage type bays (now used for tractor, skid steer and hay etc) then a 4 foot drop to the old horse barn - imagine a tic tack toe board with 1 on the top left, 4 middle left and 9 bottom right - there were 3 sliders at 2, 9 and 8 - they are all gone. The T from 8 5 and then 1 through 3 is concrete - 6 is the office, the chute  starts at 1 and ends in 7 - the gate swings in at the entrance of the chute (not ideal, but when the scales arent there it is not an issue)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 10, 2007, 02:55:11 AM
Here is the new barn.

I love my barn - it is set up so I can pretty much do anything I want by myself - if I could change anything I would make it bigger (RW - make sure you have room to expand when you build your barn - ie if you are too close to the property line you can't go any further in that direction).  I love my barn....
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Zach on July 10, 2007, 03:01:09 AM
I WISH OUR BARN WAS LIKE THAT, NOPE, ITS ABOUT 60 YEARS OLD BUT GETS THE JOB DONE
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 10, 2007, 03:39:14 AM
The nursing gates/contraptions are really useful for all sorts of things if your cattle are calm - they basically clip or bolt to a panel - you can catch the head and you can set it up so you can pull a rope from the far end as you swing the gate. I have one that swings in to the right and one to the left but you can also use them sort of  backwards - just push the cow up against another gate - also very useful for the big old cows that when pregnant won't fit in my chute (actually they would fit in the chute they just can't get there with the current set up) The picture is the front of the contraption,on the picture of the frame you can see the nursing gate to the left - it doesnt take up much space and is very useful - you may be able to see where it splits in half and can be lifted up and held in place with pins for nursing a  calf, milking out a cow and some foot work....thats all - I love my barn!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 10, 2007, 03:56:32 AM
DL - I will be building about 100 yards from my nearest boundary, that being the road. Looks like River Road got into your pocket a little, excellent gates though. I liked alot of your set up except maybe in front of the chute. This is the second one that I have built and I am thinking of putting a sale facility in this one. I agree you can never have too much electricity or water (in the right places!) My rule of thumb on electricity is triple what you think you may need, it doesn't take long to run out of outlets when you start plugging in fans, blowers, clippers,scales etc etc. My feed room will need to be fairly large as I house 2 roller mills, an electric feed mixer, feed cooker as well as the various feed ingrediants (Mix feed twice a day). I am thinking 14' side walls on the outside structure with sliding doors on the east and west ends. Keep the ideas coming about what you have done and what you would change - I hope this will be the last one I build so I am putting alot of thought into it.
Title: Re: planning for a barn
Post by: red on July 10, 2007, 10:28:33 AM
i am thinking about building a new barn. we used to use lean-tos. but i moved.

i live in southwest,ks so hot in the summer cold in the winter.i have about 11 acres that i can put it on.

i will be breakin about 12 calves that i raise every year in the winter. and then about 4-6 in the summer. i  get bagged feed in loads of 2-3 tons each time. so i will need some place and then small square bales.  i would like a wash rack. a tie rack, stalls, and then turn out pens . any one have ideas on how big and how to set it up. thanks in advance

Pigguy- I combined these topics since there were some good ideas in the first thread.

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 10, 2007, 02:29:19 PM
DL - I will be building about 100 yards from my nearest boundary, that being the road. Looks like River Road got into your pocket a little, excellent gates though. I liked alot of your set up except maybe in front of the chute. This is the second one that I have built and I am thinking of putting a sale facility in this one. I agree you can never have too much electricity or water (in the right places!) My rule of thumb on electricity is triple what you think you may need, it doesn't take long to run out of outlets when you start plugging in fans, blowers, clippers,scales etc etc. My feed room will need to be fairly large as I house 2 roller mills, an electric feed mixer, feed cooker as well as the various feed ingrediants (Mix feed twice a day). I am thinking 14' side walls on the outside structure with sliding doors on the east and west ends. Keep the ideas coming about what you have done and what you would change - I hope this will be the last one I build so I am putting alot of thought into it.

Hey RW - it wasn't River Road - we have a local guy who makes them - started as a FFA project for his son- so I could get custom everything. I am not 100% thrilled with the chute either but haven't been able to come up with a better option - it is at a bit of an angle so the cows have to make a little turn, but there is a palpation cage and a slide gate so I can  line up 3 (not the big cows) and run them thru at a time - I don't hink it would work ideally for many cattle as cows don't really like the idea of going sideways - but I train them as youngsters and have no trouble getting them to go in.

I also wish I had a different place for the scales and in a perfect world it would be separate from the chute...does need cement so still thinking...sounds like you should have a lot of fun!

Another thought - guys aren't always good about picking up nails - they make big magnets on wheels - I got one when a place went out of business...it was a real good investment - dl
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 10, 2007, 04:07:48 PM
I took a magnet out of an old grinder/mixer and mounted it on an old push mower frame. It's about 24" long and 8" wide and is a really strong magnet. Works really good for nails, screws and small pieces of scrap iron. I'm always building or modifying something to fit my needs (besides that I'm cheap). It works really good to pick up behind me. The gates sure look alot like river roads but I'm guessing the price was better!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 10, 2007, 05:26:50 PM
You are a clever fellow!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: maine12 on July 10, 2007, 05:30:31 PM
hey red can i get more pictuers of your barn.

i am thinking a 50x50 barn. with a 38 foot tie out on the west side,  on the north wall 3 10x12 stalls, a 10x10 place for hay, a 10x10 place for the showboxes, on the east wall a 10x10 sliding door , a 18 foot feed stroage,and then  on the south wall 2 10x12 stalls and a 10x12 washout, and then a 10x10 sliding door.

what do you think would be the best fans. that i can use in the barn and still take them to shows.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: knabe on July 10, 2007, 05:46:43 PM
this is probably a minor point depending on what the interior structure is, but if you make 12 foot increments, its easier for plywood and other lumber so you won't have so many shorts left over.  10 foot lumber is not common out here.  if you do 12 foot center to center, there is a few inches left over after you trim, especially if you use 6x6 posts.  plywood is obviously in 4 foot increments.  you could use a four footer and split it obviously.  the "standard" for horses is 12x12 stalls.  also, 10x10 is not very big for hay.  also on the door, consider what height is convenient to move hay into the barn.  you probably won't move a stack of 96, but they are pretty common out here.  my neighbor has a barn with the hay section so she can put three stacks of 96.  i move hay way too much and i'm not  that much stronger than dl.   whatever size you make, make it expandable.  also, install a mister and a room with a low ceiling for a cold room, vents on top,(hot air rises).
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: maine12 on July 10, 2007, 06:14:01 PM
the reason i only have a 10x10 hay spot is becasue we already have a building for hay storage. i was going to make it all low ceilings. so i could cool it easier.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 10, 2007, 06:15:34 PM
Pigguy- what do you need to see?

I like the Sullivan's Turbo fans. We have the barn fans hanging plus the big stationary fan on the ground which we can move as needed. I take the smaller 20" fans to shows.

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 10, 2007, 06:48:59 PM
the reason i only have a 10x10 hay spot is becasue we already have a building for hay storage. i was going to make it all low ceilings. so i could cool it easier.

Maybe the engineers among us can respond to this but unless you are cooling a short ceiling room I think it becomes oven like in the heat - with high ceilings the heat rises way way above the cattle, with low ceilings and tall cattle you can cook on the hoof (lol)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 10, 2007, 08:51:39 PM
Unless you insulate and use a refridgeration unit, I wouldn't go with low ceilings. As DL said heat rises and needs to be dispersed not contained. As far a barn fans go - I mount squirrel cage fans permanently in the barn. They are usually cheap at farm actions, move a ton of air and I can keep my show fans in the tack room out of the dirt and not burn up the motors.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: NHR on July 10, 2007, 09:48:54 PM
Here is the philosophy on high ceilings versus low ceilings.

Back in the day all homes/buildings were built with high enterior ceilings because heat naturally rises because heated air is lighter (think hot air balloon). When air conditioners became available ceiling heights began to shrink (bad idea). Since this is the case a taller ceiling will help let the heat rise, so make sure the ceiling is high enough to keep the heat above the cattle, just as important is to allow the heat out of the top of the barn. By creating an escape for the heat natural airflow occurs. you can actually create airflow through the barn with open sides and open ridge vent which is how we built our barn down here in Texas. We are in the process of designing a new barn and I will take what I have learned on the old barn and hopefully improve it.

If you want a good example of heat try this, duct tape all your eaves vents on your house attic and then see how high your electric bill will get in the summer. Plus during the winter you get the added benfit of moisture in your home if you forget to take the tape off.

The best scenario would be to install an exhaust fan in the ceiling attached to a thermostat so you can control how and when it will come on. Creating airflow in your barn will help keep your animals from getting ill.

Our high school ag barn has tall ceilings but no vents for the hot air to escape so it is miserable in it. We have shorter ceilings in our barn but have a way for hot air to escape so it is significantly cooler.


"Fine Print"
The above statement is only from experiences and should not be taken for exact engineering guidelines. Not responsible for spelling or grammar mistakes (I'm from Texas). By reading this you agree you have to much time on your hands.


Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sawboss on July 11, 2007, 12:58:55 PM
I use permanent mounted Sullivan Turbo Fan over each 8'x16' pen, then I have a 16" Porta Cool Fan that blows across all four pens.  I like the water cool fan because it does not blow a mist.  You can take it to shows, weighs 80 lbs., all you need is 110 volt outlet and water faucet.  If water is not available they make a portable stand with water reservoir.  This little unit will drop the air temp by 20 degrees over a 600 square foot area.  This is probably the best investment I have made!  Fan cost without stand $750, with stand and 50 gallon reservoir $1030.  Look on their website for models and options.  I bought mine through Tractor Supply Co. they gave me the best deal.  They are made in Center, Tx. 40 miles from my house, but will not sell direct.  A great product, it is the unit you see on the sidelines of NFL, NCAA and High School football games.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: afhm on July 11, 2007, 06:19:47 PM
Best thing to do is take a road trip a look at other peoples facilities.  Take pictures  and notes, ask them why  they did this ir that and what they would do different.  Then take what you like about each place  and put them together for your barn.  The main things I suggest is if you think you have enough electricity, you don't.  You can put in double what you think you need and still come up short at times.  Also don't get land locked so to speak, position the barn where you can add on to it when you decide its not big enough (always just a matter of time).
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: maine12 on July 11, 2007, 10:26:45 PM
that is the problem. there arent many show barns where i am at. i have plenty of room to add on to the building. what do you guys use as stalls. and how about your wash stalls
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jill on July 12, 2007, 04:37:08 PM
Where are you located?  I will try and get you some pictures, thing have been very hectic. 
I agree though, we spent years planning our new barn and toured every barn we could to come up with what seemed to works best for others.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: maine12 on July 12, 2007, 04:39:39 PM
we are in southwest ks
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 12, 2007, 04:50:26 PM
pigguy- that's what we did when we built both our barns. We went around looking at different set-ups to get ideas. since our big barn also stores some of the farm's equipment, we knew we needed high ceilings & big doors.

My hubby made most of the gates we use for pens. I realize not everyone can do that but it really saved $ & also he made them to a specific size.

Lighting is very important too. You need good lights & also lots of electrical outlets. My biggest mistake was not having an indoor washrack put in. Although I just wash outside the door, it gets very cold & icy in the winter. I don't think the hubby thought we'd continue washing calves after the daughter was done w/ 4-H. Surprised him when I keep going out in below freezing weather. I know OH B checks to make sure I haven't snuck an extra heifer into his place!

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: garybob on July 12, 2007, 07:53:40 PM
I'd be tickled to death, with the structures you guys are complaining about! Be thankful for your blessings.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DL on July 13, 2007, 02:05:20 AM
garybob - I am not complaining about my barn - I love my barn!

On another related topic something we haven't really specifically discussed..cow comfort ...including air quality, footing, temperature etc. When I designed my barn I thought about cow  comfort, safety (cow and human), and convience - as a work in progress it is always being tweeked!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Zach on July 13, 2007, 03:39:00 AM
wish i had enough to build a new barn, ours is only good for leading in circles, hay, water, and a feed room
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 13, 2007, 09:43:22 AM
I think we all can dream about what if! I think that is some of the best & cheapest thing to do in life.

Red (clapping)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 13, 2007, 02:16:52 PM
garybob - I am not complaining about my barn - I love my barn!

On another related topic something we haven't really specifically discussed..cow comfort ...including air quality, footing, temperature etc. When I designed my barn I thought about cow  comfort, safety (cow and human), and convience - as a work in progress it is always being tweeked!


I think air quality is something that is overlooked alot, a friend of mine has a spectactular facility in every aspect except air movement and quality - in the summer there is no air movement whatsoever, even with turbo fans it stays hot even with 14' side walls. I personally like limey chips for a base on the barn floor (natural PH balancer) cows have good footing on it and when you clean the barn, anything you haul out can be replaced easily and cheaply. Safety and convienience - I work by myself most of the time so convienience and functionability are big issues. I do not like tubs at all, I preferr long twisting - turning alley ways that lead to the scale and chute.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jill on July 13, 2007, 10:30:46 PM
I think we all can dream about what if! I think that is some of the best & cheapest thing to do in life.

Red (clapping)
We dreamed for 20 years before building this new barn, they don't happen over night, everything is very expensive!  Take your time and make sure when you build that you get what you wanted.

Ok, here are the pictures I promised.  This 1st set is other peoples barns that we felt were the most functional from a show side. 
1.  The 1st picture is for Red, this barn belongs to Barry Queen (J-Bar Ranch), his facitlity is a little older and very functional.  The inside right of this building houses a walk in cooler, the 1st section is a wash rack and then you walk through a set of doors into the actual cooler.  The outside pen sections are all connected to the fencing and flow through to an outside chute and load out.
2-5.  These pictures are from Bonham Show Cattle, they have one of the best facilities that we toured and we built the cooler following his set up.  Our cooler is a 12 X 48 enough space for 12 calves  and his is (I think) a 16 X 50 X 2 cooler sides alike, we didn't think we needed the 16 feet extra space in the back, but really wish we had gone ahead with it.  The pen systems they have are excellent for show cattle, well designed and functional.  The wash rack is still on our list of to do's however we will build ours indoors other than that wouldn't change it, I don't think it gets as cold there as it does here.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Zach on July 13, 2007, 10:42:44 PM
i really like yours jill  (clapping)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jill on July 13, 2007, 11:06:35 PM
Ok, here are the pictures from our barn.  We did things probably a little different, we needed a multi-function barn, we have a construction company and have machinery and parts in part of the barn.  We have the show cattle and needed it to be functional for the cows calving also, our winters are cold and when it gets too cold we calve everything out in the barn.  We built a 72 (the most with no interior beam) X 120 main barn and a 36 X 120 lean to that is attached.  We live in a VERY urban area so we built it so that it could easily be converted to an indoor riding area with horse stalls in the lean to on 12 foot centers.  If I read this right the barn doors are 30 X 16 and we have them on the West, North and South, on the East we have 2 6 foot sliding walk through doors and figured if we ever have a sale those would work great.  Our working facility is set up on the South end of the lean to with a drive through load at gate at the exit of the barn.  We didn't really like the tub idea, it seemed single function for no more cattle than we process, we went with the WW called Classic 300-S-10ft with a Stampeed Steele chute.  We liked this set up because 1 person can work cattle on it can be all shut down to make 3 pens for calving.  Our center alley opens up into pens that we have set up as 24 foot width, but can be 12 foot if needed, there is a feeder panel and a walk through gate in each pen and a richie water at the 12 foot divider panel so each 12 feet has a water hole.  I don't know how far out it is, but the overhead you see it the clean out alley, these pens can either be long runs (when money and time permits the pens will run the full length of the pasture for rotational grazing option) or the gates can be shut to make additional short pens.  The pens on the west side of the lean to are the calving pens.  The cooler and wash rack are inside the main barn.  It has 16 foot side walls and the east and west sides will both have second story hay storage areas, the cupalos are vented and have attic fans that kick on at I think 85 to pull the hot air out of the top of the barn.  The floors in the lean to are all a thick lime base on a slope.  The gutter drains, wash rack drain, cooler drain, office and bathroom drains all are connected underground and daylight out in the pasture. As far as electric goes, we have an 800 amp service that does both the house and barn.  If you instal a seperate meter for the barn you are charge a commercial rate for your power, check with your electric company before you make a decision to get a 2nd meter, it may be a costly mistake, it would have been for us.  Anyway, I have probably rambeled enough, l like DL we love our barn, it is a work in progress and we still have a ways to go, but it is so nice.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 14, 2007, 11:55:05 AM
great set-up Jill, I'm jealous!
But where were the corgis?

Red (dog)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Dan on July 16, 2007, 11:26:23 PM
It all depends on whether you are fancy functional or plain functional. If you are fancy go to Jac's Ranch in Bentonville, AR (very, very nice) If you are plain, like most of us are go see Wilson Cattle Co. in Cloverdale, IN

Both are big time angus outfits, both have really functional facilities. Just one is fancier than the other
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: SRU on July 17, 2007, 02:09:25 AM
jacs is pretty flashy
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 17, 2007, 04:19:36 AM
I want it to look nice but it needs to be functional above all. I've been drawing out blue prints and pricing materials. This is for sure a sizeable investment and one that takes alot of forethought.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jill on July 17, 2007, 12:04:02 PM
Good idea, we had everything on paper before we started, the flow we wanted and the pens coming out of the barn.  The ASCS or whatever it is called now was very helpful with drawing up the rotational fencing and the lines to pump water from the pond, they have a computer program that does that and it give you your square footage of each fence line.  Good luck, it is alot of hard work and very costly, but it is so much fun.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sawboss on July 17, 2007, 07:37:42 PM
I hope you have fun, our new barn has been a pain.  Make sure you check out all contractors you use, some will tell you what you want to hear and then do what they please.  Do not get in a hurry because their timeline and yours will not be the same.  I will post pictures of ours as soon as it is finished.  I had everything drawn out from rough construction to electrical outlets, they will not see it the way that you do unless they are in the showing business.  Good luck and don't let the stress get to you.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: knabe on July 17, 2007, 09:20:02 PM
INSURANCE

make sure you get a copy of the insurance and if they are using subcontractors (so they can use illegal aliens sometimes), make sure you can have a copy and have your lawyer look at it.  my neighbor had her roof redone and a skylight put in and a guy fell through the ceiling, broke his ankle.  they didn't have insurance, contractor skipped town, contractor's son left with the bill.  could have easily been my neighbor stuck with it.  can't believe there wasn't a swarm of lawyers.  you might also consider a blanket insurance policy up to a million.  it's not that much to purchase and it covers most everything except gross negligence.  two neighbors down are building a small barn.  hired illegals to dig and put the posts in.  not level, not square, they didn't put the posts square in the hole.  one side was 4 inches short of a full sheet of plywood.  get some measurements of satisfaction and look at their work.  it's probably not as bad as in CA where almost everyone is a crook in the construction business that lowballs.  be very careful and don't take the lowest bid like the government and suffer the consequences later.  also be very careful of cement work.  again in CA, there is something to do with the pH of the soil and the cement deteriorating and make sure it is reinforced adequately with appropriate base for your area.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jill on July 17, 2007, 09:35:38 PM
Knabe, you are a gem, but I agree you can get shoddy workmanship anywhere.  We did most of the work ourselves, we are in that line of work so we did our own barn pad, concrete, electric, water and such.  We hired Morton building to build the building, they are probably a little more expensive than some that are out there but I guess our feeling was you get what you pay for on this type of thing.  It was worth the extra cost to us to not have to worry about the building, they are insured and guaranteed, they are a pleasure to work with and if we built again today we wouldn't do anything different.  Most important remember this is your barn, they will do it the way you want or you find someone different to work with.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Dan on July 17, 2007, 09:46:02 PM
By now you've read alot of diffrent ideas and looked at alot of pics of other peoples facilities. But only you really can make this decision. You know about the location and the drainage of the plot of land where you want to build. All you really need to keep show cattle is 3 major things. SHADE, WATER(with good pressure) and ELECTRICITY ( plan on running 20 fans and half a dozen blowers all at the same time, if you plan big you might have enough.) Other than those 3 things I'd have to say that I agree with a previos reply that I read "Don't skimp on the concrete" Good luck and I hope you will post pics of your barn during construction and after it is  finished
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: chambero on July 17, 2007, 10:34:46 PM
Any shoddy work we have on ours is our fault - we do most of it ourselves.  We have enough steel pipe in the ground at our place to mess up a compass on a plane flying overhead.  But they work and will be there long after we are dead.

If you can lay it out on paper yourself, there are usually no shortage of local welders that will build things for you much cheaper (and often better) than a typical professional contractor. 
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DLD on July 18, 2007, 06:37:12 AM
Any shoddy work we have on ours is our fault - we do most of it ourselves.  We have enough steel pipe in the ground at our place to mess up a compass on a plane flying overhead.  But they work and will be there long after we are dead.

If you can lay it out on paper yourself, there are usually no shortage of local welders that will build things for you much cheaper (and often better) than a typical professional contractor. 

I second that statement. We're actually just finishing up a new show barn - I'll try to get some pics up, but we're having some problems with our camera and this computer getting along...

This one's pretty much just a show barn, and is alot smaller than many of you are talking about. Maybe part of it's 'cause we build 'em ourselves, but we tend to prefer 3 or 4 smaller buildings over 1 big one. I do have a friend that just built a big sale barn/show barn/shop, with a really nice set of pens - I'll try to get some pics of that one too,  if he doesn't mind (doubt he will, he's pretty proud of it).
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: afhm on July 18, 2007, 01:57:17 PM
DLD is this friend of yours in Canute?  I heard he was building a real nice one like you described.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: DLD on July 18, 2007, 05:39:23 PM
No afhm, that's not who I'm talking about. I do know Dean, and I hear he's really doing it up nice this time, but I haven't seen it yet. His old facilities were pretty dang nice anyway. The friend I'm referring is an Angus breeder - Tim Henricks. His place is only about 3 miles from mine, and we help each other out alot. They had their bull sale in it this spring, but they're still working on a few things.

David
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: mommacow on July 18, 2007, 08:44:06 PM
A bathroom!!  Just a toilet and sink, but besure if you do have this to clean it on a regular basis I have been in some nasty barn bathrooms....
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 18, 2007, 08:52:11 PM
The extra expence of a sceptic system is hard to justify. The barn will be within spitting distance of the house anyway. I will have sinks there though. When we have anything that there might be several people attending we usually rent the lovely blue houses.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: knabe on July 18, 2007, 09:10:02 PM
if we put a toilet in a barn out here, we have to get a permit, taxed at a different rate, and must sign a document no one can live there, can't generate revenue from someone living there.  ha, and to bring up the neighbors again, as i'm looking through the archives of our shared water company, one neighbor told the county inspector about someone using a barn as a rental and how on many levels it didn't comply with local ordinances.  yet another neighbor rents porta potties to preserve his septic all the time as he has lots of kids and their partiers are blowouts.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: mommacow on July 19, 2007, 03:01:28 PM
Most places any barn (Group U) over 120 square feet needs a permit I would personally check with your building department.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 20, 2007, 12:48:17 PM
Fortunetly we live far enough away from civilization that we don't have to deal with building permits and that type of thing. Sceptic systems are about the only thing that require permits for new structures.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sawboss on July 20, 2007, 01:12:42 PM
Almost there!  Electrical and final dirt work complted yesterday.  All we need is outside plumbing finished and build pens inside.  I hope to have animals in their new home in one week.  This will make life so much easier on the boys, our old facilities are as crude as it gets.  We are excited except for Mom, I went a little over budget.  Oh well if you are not in debt, it just means you are not trying.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on July 20, 2007, 01:15:19 PM
Can't wait for pictures!

what are you using for bedding?

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sawboss on July 20, 2007, 02:09:48 PM
Green cedar mulch in the cool room and green pine sawdust in pens and fitting area.  This works really well because it has enough moisture to pack and controls odor also.  The biggest factor is it is free!  I haul it home by the dump truck load from my sawmill.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ROAD WARRIOR on July 20, 2007, 03:09:36 PM
You're a lucky man to have access to free bedding. I have a deal with the guy that does tree removall for the local electric co. When he is working in the area he dumps the shredded tree/bark etc. here. I just wish he worked here more often. I have to buy bedding otherwise.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sawboss on July 20, 2007, 03:17:50 PM
Anyone in our area, or wants to send semi I will sell the pine for $20/ton.  Dump it and tarp it, semi should last a year.  Legally we can ship about 32 tons/load.  That may be cheaper than buying it by the bag.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: chambero on July 20, 2007, 03:35:54 PM
I might take you up on that someday.  We live up by Wichita Falls.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sawboss on July 20, 2007, 04:35:13 PM
Come on we will fix you up.  I picked up a set of used Paul scales with Silver King squeeze chute outside of Archer City about a month ago.  I made the round trip in 11 hrs. pulling a 24' gooseneck trailer.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: maine12 on July 21, 2007, 09:44:51 PM
Anyone in our area, or wants to send semi I will sell the pine for $20/ton.  Dump it and tarp it, semi should last a year.  Legally we can ship about 32 tons/load.  That may be cheaper than buying it by the bag.
yea cheaper then a can get it buy the bag it is 9 bucks a bag for 12 cubic yards
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: kimbaljd on March 11, 2008, 02:06:37 PM
Great subject here. Got some good tips for myself.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: CM Cattle on December 05, 2008, 08:45:35 PM
Green cedar mulch in the cool room and green pine sawdust in pens and fitting area.  This works really well because it has enough moisture to pack and controls odor also.  The biggest factor is it is free!  I haul it home by the dump truck load from my sawmill.
I live by an amish sawmill, and they give me as much mulch and sawdust as I want 4 free!!!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: feeder duck on December 23, 2008, 12:37:51 AM
  Here is our barn. It is 30 x 56 with a 12 ft open side added. The open side fits a trailer at 24ft then I have two night loafing areas under it as well.  We have three runs one of which is for pictures and working calves and pigs. Since the indoor photos we have added a Riveroad chute and put the old chute at our cow barn. All gates in the barn are custom fit Riveroad gates. It has a 10 x 12 and a 10 x 10 pens across from pig pens. I have every outlet on its own breaker. Plenty of power. Outlets by the chute are 6ft high. No cords on the ground when clipping in the chute. We set up four 5 x 10  Riveroad pig pens .We have a wash tie and a water heater with a 15 ft trench drain in the shop area.I can park a boat and two trucks in the front shop half as well, in the winter. I needed a place to park a four door that would not fit in the garage. The barn is well insulated.We have a great beer,pop and candy fridge and a serious stero. You can hear it over fans and blowers.  Its not huge but works well for three or four head for the kids.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: JohnsonCattleCo. on February 06, 2009, 06:23:43 PM
I recently built a new barn not even a year ago, and i got morton builders to build it. it is a really nice barn, very good price wise, and the best part is they allow you to draw and design the barn yourself and adding on is cheap and easy.They even put it up in less than 3 weeks. I will get pics of mine and post them shortly and give you a brief description on how it is so efficent.
 
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jason on February 08, 2009, 05:07:46 AM
would love to see pics, morton builds a lot of barns around our area (east ks).


I recently built a new barn not even a year ago, and i got morton builders to build it. it is a really nice barn, very good price wise, and the best part is they allow you to draw and design the barn yourself and adding on is cheap and easy.They even put it up in less than 3 weeks. I will get pics of mine and post them shortly and give you a brief description on how it is so efficent.
 
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: FutureBreeder on February 15, 2009, 04:16:37 PM
http://pelennor.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/nwl/2005/2005-1-leoletter/images/hoops3.gif (http://pelennor.leopold.iastate.edu/pubs/nwl/2005/2005-1-leoletter/images/hoops3.gif)




how about a hoop barn i know a guy that has a few and he said als long as you have a door instead of a gate for entry its stays warm during the cold months and cool in the hot months 
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: red on February 16, 2009, 04:47:07 PM
we have both a Lester barn- show calf barn & a Morton- cows & equipment. Morton better quality but Lester better looking.

Red
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jason on February 25, 2009, 08:35:08 AM
I am thinking of building a pole barn this spring.  I guess I need to get a material lists and get an idea of cost
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Eberth on June 10, 2009, 11:23:32 PM
Just came across these pictures on my old camara and thought I would share them. This is the barn I ran two summers ago while working for Tony Austin it used to be the barn Robbie Martin from Tx used and Tony rents the barn for the summer since it just sits there. Nothing too fancy but very nice and useful and gets the job done.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: forbes family farms on July 06, 2009, 11:34:18 PM
Very nice barns. I wish our barns looked like that. Our old barn was better than our new barn wish we still had it but a tornado took it.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: j3cattleco on October 25, 2009, 12:26:35 AM
We finally finished our barn so I thought I would share photos.  First are pictures of our turnouts each of them is about 1.5 acres and allow cattle plenty of room to move at night.  Natext is a picture of one of the pens the pens are 12X18 and we now have 3 of those that open into the turnouts.  We feel in the cooler or bunks so we don't really use the pens much. Next is a picture of our wash rack that is not big enough and going to be redone.  then we have a picture of where we can tie calves to display or work with the blower.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: j3cattleco on October 25, 2009, 12:29:36 AM
 Last are pictures of our cooler.  We just used 8 inch perlin and stuffed it full of insualtion.  Its the same size as one of the pens and we have a cool calf unit in it.  We put fans behind the calves and blow out cattle inside the cooler most of the time.  This was about 1/3 the cost of the cool calf box and is actually about 50% better R valued for insulation so hopefully will cut the electric bill.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Kansas Karl on October 30, 2009, 04:16:32 AM
What did you do for your floor?
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: mashowcattle on November 17, 2009, 03:44:23 PM
i guess this has to do with a barn. but we are wanting to buy a cooler but at the moment i cant afford a whole entire cool calf unit. but i have a man that will sell me a cool box. its the box on a big box truck but it is refrigerated and we were wondering if that would work just as good but we can just put it on a slope and make a drain system and put vents in it. just need some opinions on if that will work just as good!

thanks,
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Cardinal_Crest_Shorthorns on November 27, 2009, 11:38:53 PM
I noticed a few people have mentioned feed storage, we use old, out of order deep freezes. they are great for keeping out the rodents.
We buy them from a friend who sales appliances for about 25 or 30 dollars, so its a pretty cheap method
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Kansas Karl on December 06, 2009, 04:09:39 AM
i guess this has to do with a barn. but we are wanting to buy a cooler but at the moment i cant afford a whole entire cool calf unit. but i have a man that will sell me a cool box. its the box on a big box truck but it is refrigerated and we were wondering if that would work just as good but we can just put it on a slope and make a drain system and put vents in it. just need some opinions on if that will work just as good!

thanks,
There is a guy in town that made a cooler room and put the reefer unit in the wall, worked real well.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: mashowcattle on December 29, 2009, 02:07:17 PM
i guess this has to do with a barn. but we are wanting to buy a cooler but at the moment i cant afford a whole entire cool calf unit. but i have a man that will sell me a cool box. its the box on a big box truck but it is refrigerated and we were wondering if that would work just as good but we can just put it on a slope and make a drain system and put vents in it. just need some opinions on if that will work just as good!

thanks,
There is a guy in town that made a cooler room and put the reefer unit in the wall, worked real well.

my concern is the cattle getting sick because of the ammonia because there is not enough ventilation.. would there be enough ventilation in something like that verses a whole cool calf room?..
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jill on December 29, 2009, 04:34:54 PM
If I remember correctly the refer unit is what Gleue's have used for years.  It doesn't make any difference which way you go, the bedding has to be kept clean, that is the only way to keep the amonia smell out, doesn't matter what type of unit you are using. 
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: bruiser on December 29, 2009, 07:07:16 PM
I helped build two coolers last winter. One was a large Morton type building ( working great). The other a lean- to type w/ actual cool calf unit (bad design). The big building uses two 3-ton a\c units with air handlers mounted on ceiling (ducts move air to pens)
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Steer Boy 101 on January 05, 2010, 01:11:34 AM
The morton style you are talking about is what i have. It seams to get the job done real well and from other people i talk to in my area my bill is cheaper than theirs. They have actual refridgeation uints. I have a 2 ton home unint with a home furance air handler wtih a 12 inch duct coming for the return out of the opposite corners which ihave anther 12inch duct dumping cold air in. i keep it 50 no problems. cheap too. My cousin got it for free form his bosss. the unit is newer than in my house.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sholm on March 08, 2010, 02:04:47 PM
Were putting in a indoor wash room and going to put holes in the floor so that we can put pipes sticking up to keep the calves from moving around. How far apart would you put the pipes and how far from the front gate that we tie them to? Would you put extra holes so that you can move the pipes for different size cattle?

Also what type of a drain system do most of you have? We were thinking about putting in a ejector pit instead of just a drain to the outside. Live in northern Illinois where it freezes - this winter for 4 months.

thanks
S
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Steer Boy 101 on March 16, 2010, 01:04:10 AM
if you check out Brad hooks Vids online they show one like you talkin about at tracy goretskas place. it says about 3 feed from the wall and 3 feet apart
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Gators Rule on March 28, 2011, 02:53:07 AM
We also have a squeeze chute so we can work w/ the calves if needed.

Notice the blue Heeler has to be in all pictures!

Red (dog)

gotta love that Priefert blue!!
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jeferin on September 16, 2011, 07:08:58 PM
Any new show barn pics out there?
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ransom14 on February 10, 2012, 08:39:49 PM
My family has recently built a show/calving barn.  We are still working on getting it done.  Here are a few pics of the pen system that we have installed.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ransom14 on February 10, 2012, 08:59:18 PM
Continuation of previous post with Pen Pictures.

When we built the barn we wanted to create as much airflow as possible.  The barn is 88'x 30' with a 20'x20' bump-out for a heated washrack and grooming area.  We placed 4 - 4'x8' sliding windows on the West side of the barn.  The main door is a 10'x12' overhead door on the South side.  Sliding door that is 12'x12' on the North side.  There are 8 10'x14' pens with Ritchie automatic waterers splitting the pens.  4' walkthrough gates on each pen with a 10' swing gate that opens to the outside releasing the calves into the runs.  All the pens are on the East side of barn leaving the West side of barn as an isle to feed, clean, drive machinery through etc...  I posted a few pics of the barn.  Let me know what you think.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: Jeferin on June 25, 2012, 05:20:34 PM
Nice barn. Do you have any finished photos?
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: ransom14 on June 28, 2012, 03:21:25 PM
I have not completed the washrack yet.  The pens are done and are in use.  I will try to take a few pics and post in the next few days.

Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: dentalshowman on September 01, 2012, 01:40:23 AM
Good idea i asked show times magazine to write an article about this in one of their issues.  I'd like to see examples of show barns and what works and doesn't work.  I'm in the planning stage of building one for our program and spending a lot of time researching for designs and ideas.  Frustrating cuz not a hole lot out there.
Title: Re: building a new barn
Post by: sonander on January 22, 2013, 12:25:22 PM
 building a new barn, your first barn or an addition to your barn, there are several factors that you should consider.