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Messages - DLD

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1
The Big Show / Re: Breed Question
« on: January 13, 2020, 08:28:34 PM »



If you want the ones you cant sell as show calves to have any commercial value in Oklahoma, youd better keep them solid red or black. Baldies with just a little white sell well - roans and paints do not. Herefords sell a little better, but still way behind the black ones. I like Herefords and Shorthorns, and I dont believe the bias is justified, but it exists and youll see it every day at the sale barns. If you can sell enough show calves for enough premium, it might well be worth it - and as mark tenenbaum said, the potential is out there. But its a lot easier said than done.

That said we still have a few Herefords and Shorthorns, but we AI for show calves and clean them up with Angus or Red Angus bulls. But if I was starting today from scratch, Id buy nothing but solid black or solid red ones - I truly believe that its almost certainly the more profitable option.

///// Like that everywhere as far as the salebarn-But not necessarily that way for showy ones-Which it appears is what they want to do-Even back here in the land of outdoor plumbing-a good Shorthorn calf will attract alot of buyers-Sheer lack of numbers-The skinny dairy rats-like any color dont bring anything The other possiblity if its feasible (pretty tough when embryos bring over $1000 each in some cases) is to buy embryos on the hi end Texas club calves-raise them out with good cheap WRONG COLOR COWS-and sell them. O0


Like I said - if you can sell enough of them for show calves it might be worth it. Not every colored up calf is going to be show quality, not even every embryo, even from a proven mating.

Im not knocking your breed or your passion for them. Like I said, we own some too. But the original poster asked for our opinions. You gave yours, I gave mine.

2
The Big Show / Re: Breed Question
« on: January 12, 2020, 08:48:34 PM »
If you want the ones you can’t sell as show calves to have any commercial value in Oklahoma, you’d better keep them solid red or black. Baldies with just a little white sell well - roans and paints do not. Herefords sell a little better, but still way behind the black ones. I like Herefords and Shorthorns, and I don’t believe the bias is justified, but it exists and you’ll see it every day at the sale barns. If you can sell enough show calves for enough premium, it might well be worth it - and as mark tenenbaum said, the potential is out there. But it’s a lot easier said than done.

That said we still have a few Herefords and Shorthorns, but we AI for show calves and clean them up with Angus or Red Angus bulls. But if I was starting today from scratch, I’d buy nothing but solid black or solid red ones - I truly believe that it’s almost certainly the more profitable option.

3
The Big Show / Re: steer hair help
« on: November 26, 2019, 08:55:24 PM »
Theyre always shedding some hair, year round. 

For what its worth, I think you need to keep that dead hair cleaned out so the scalp can breathe.  Ive seen steers that were never combed or brushed all winter long - washed with a foamier, rinsed, blown, products blown in, but never combed or brushed because they could see hair coming out if they did. When theyre finally ready to clip, by the time theyre scrubbed, combed out and blown dry, it suddenly seems like they have half the hair you thought they had.

We use a plastic fluffer or skip tooth every time we work them. Rice root too, of course.

4
The Big Show / Re: how to become a cattle jock
« on: October 11, 2019, 03:06:34 AM »
I guess everyones definitions vary.  To me, clipping/fitting makes you a fitter not a jock.  Raising them makes you a breeder.  Trading them makes you a jock. 

Granted many people do fall into 2 or all 3 of those categories.

But yeah, Id say the tiny saddle and tights would qualify, too.  Remember - pics or it didnt happen...  (lol)

5
The Big Show / Re: Secrets to feeding a show steer
« on: September 25, 2019, 11:16:26 PM »
VC’s advice is words to live by for feeding show steers, and I’m also with JacobB on the custom mix.  We always had several on feed, and I always feel like I could do more with less $ than the sacked show feeds.

My two cents here is a cheap answer to your calves turning over their feed pans. Find some old tires that you can set your pans inside - we always use the flexible black rubber feed pans and they will set inside a 15 or 16” tire.  You may need a little larger one for the hard plastic pans, I’m not sure. 

6
The Big Show / Re: Black Noses On Shorthorn Cattle by Dr. Martin Lee
« on: September 13, 2019, 10:29:41 PM »
Shows what I know, I guess.  My family raised Polled Herefords, that was the only Shorthorn I ever had anything to do with until my kids started showing.  Weve had a handful since, but to be honest I still dont keep up with pedigrees. 

7
The Big Show / Re: Black Noses On Shorthorn Cattle by Dr. Martin Lee
« on: September 13, 2019, 08:59:30 PM »
May not have much if any bearing on the conversation, but back in 1981 I showed a Shorthorn steer from Deer Trail that had a black nose. He was a good one, was breed champion or reserve every time he was shown but one, before Tulsa. A prominent Shorthorn breeder here in Oklahoma classified Shorthorn steers at the Tulsa State Fair - he kicked him out because of his black nose.  Which might have been reasonable except his own kids were showing Shorthorn steers and the other 5 or 6 he kicked out didnt have black noses, but had also been doing some winning. The small satisfaction was that he missed one, and his kids didnt have Champion - still had reserve and the next one in sale order, though.

But I digress. Deer Trail did 100% stand behind the steer being purebred.  I used to be able to tell you his sire and maternal grandsire, seems like maybe Improver and/or Leader, but ive slept once or twice since then. Maybe the black nose was why he was a steer and not left a bull...  At that time he probably was sired by Guiness or possibly a Dynomite 80 who was a light roan dividend son-out of a Marvel cow-Deertrail Goliath was also a Guiness x Marvel  O0

I found some old notes in my scrapbook. They said the steer was sired by Deerpark Leader 13th.  He was born in 1973, so thats sure possible. If i knew the maternal side I didnt make a note of that.

8
The Big Show / Re: Black Noses On Shorthorn Cattle by Dr. Martin Lee
« on: September 12, 2019, 09:33:22 PM »
May not have much if any bearing on the conversation, but back in 1981 I showed a Shorthorn steer from Deer Trail that had a black nose. He was a good one, was breed champion or reserve every time he was shown but one, before Tulsa. A prominent Shorthorn breeder here in Oklahoma classified Shorthorn steers at the Tulsa State Fair - he kicked him out “because of his black nose”.  Which might have been reasonable except his own kids were showing Shorthorn steers and the other 5 or 6 he kicked out didn’t have black noses, but had also been doing some winning. The small satisfaction was that he missed one, and his kids didn’t have Champion - still had reserve and the next one in sale order, though.

But I digress. Deer Trail did 100% stand behind the steer being purebred.  I used to be able to tell you his sire and maternal grandsire, seems like maybe Improver and/or Leader, but i’ve slept once or twice since then. Maybe the black nose was why he was a steer and not left a bull...

9
Please don’t try to make it airtight unless you’re going to invest in a thermostat controlled electromagnetic door and/or an alarm system in case the power goes off or your cooling unit fails. Or unless someone can monitor it at least every hour.  Without fresh air, the results can be fatal, very quickly.  That’s not a chance worth taking IMO.

We used shade cloth around a pen under an open barn, with water coolers and fans. Not nearly as cool as you can get a sealed, insulated room, but you can grow hair with it, and it’s a whole lot safer than an unmonitored cool room.

10
What exactly are you talking about? Do you mean the little plastic piece above the blades on some of the popular small Andes clippers (and maybe others)?  Those get bumped a few times and the plastic clips get broken or bent to where they just don’t stay on. So most of them either get trashed or are randomly floating around in a clipper box/bag.

Or do you actually mean the guards of various thickness that you snap on the bottom of (some) blades to keep you from taking off too much hair?  If that’s what you mean, you simply can’t blend and shape with those. They work only where you want to leave everything the same length in relation to the body shape underneath it. About the only place you ever see anyone use them clipping show cattle is maybe on the sides of the neck, and at that it’s probably only because the calf won’t hold still enough to let someone block it in correctly.

11
The Big Show / Re: Non paying show cattle trader
« on: August 28, 2019, 07:15:19 PM »
Talk to your district attorney.  As others have said, you may be told that you essentially extended him credit, therefore its a civil matter.  But if your DA is willing to help, one call threatening arrest can work magic...

I understand that youd like to keep it civil and just between the two of you, but when they stop communicating with you, you pretty well know they have no intention of paying.  Then you need to take the next step.

12
The Big Show / Re: Best Purebred Hereford Bull For Steers
« on: August 14, 2019, 11:29:49 AM »
Sioux Empire

13
The Big Show / Re: Steer high protein feed??
« on: August 05, 2019, 04:56:40 PM »
“Scoop” means nothing if you don’t weigh it.  Even if everyone’s scoop holds the same volume, the same volume of different feeds will weigh differently. Spend a few bucks on a hanging scale, weigh your feed, then get back to us.

Cattle are like kids, they won’t grow at the same rate all of their lives.  You’ll have growth spurts and you’ll have periods where gain flattens out.   Absolutely you do need to weigh your steers regularly and be conscious of where they are in relation to their projected end point, BUT, don’t get so fixated on a certain end weight that you don’t get them finished correctly.  And remember that there a lot of factors that can affect a single weigh. Don’t make drastic changes based on a weekly weight, look at it over a longer period of time.

You’re talking about San Antonio Or Houston - no matter what your steer weighs, the same number from every class (at least within your breed) will make the sale.  Make sure he’s right for his weight.  940 today is not necessarily way too heavy for those shows.

14
The Big Show / Re: best clipper lube?
« on: July 15, 2019, 10:06:41 AM »
If you’re going to use anything heavy like motor oil, be very careful to wipe any residue off before you start clipping - the last thing you need is a glob of that heavy oil getting in your calf’s hair, especially if you’re fitting.  The heavier oil is no doubt better for the life of your clipper blades, but mere convenience isn’t the only reason most fitters use final bloom (or something similar).  Whatever you use for lube, get yourself a small soft brush to clean your clippers, and use it regularly - especially when you’re clipping in adhesives.

I like the little bottle of oil that comes with the Andes clippers - I use it when I start and when I stop, but again - being sure to wipe away residue.  But when i’m fitting, especially like a leg, I use a quick shot of final bloom regularly. As long as you don’t overdo it, it won’t break down your adhesive but your blades will cut much better and smoother. Be sure when you spray it on your blades the overspray isn’t hitting the leg.

15
I have the ZR’s - they’re handy to have around, but I probably would have never bought them myself, they were a gift. I keep 2 or 3 sets of 2 speeds that I use almost all of the time.  Occasionally, if I remember to have the cordless ones charged, I’ll take them to the make up ring - rarely use them much even then. We do go to a slick shear jackpot show where the rules state that only cordless clippers may be used at the show, so we use them for touch up there.  There’s really nothing wrong with them, I’m just not in the habit of using them. But if you really want them, you will probably end up using them more than I do.

The difference in the ZR and the ZR II appears to be a detachable battery (and around $80). Not sure if that includes an extra battery or not.  I’d guess if you plan on using them a lot, being able to use one battery while you’re charging another would be nice. I don’t honestly know how long the charge on the ZR would last using them alone to actually clip or fit - I know they can be on the charger overnight and off all day, using them just a little here and there throughout the day, they seem to hold up very well.

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