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Offline KDM

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2011, 01:52:42 PM »
I think before I sent him to the locker; I would put a nose ring in him and see if that will help.  I have a little girl showing and I put one in every steer we put on feed. It makes a big difference for a little one.

Offline Zach

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2011, 09:27:54 PM »
They have to learn sometime. 
The livestock (show) industry is a tough one- if you've never had anything worth a damn you might as well go on the internet and rundown everybody you can.

Offline Gators Rule

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2011, 07:20:51 PM »
smart move!   Hind sight is always 20/20....but in the future, get your daughter involved in the breaking of her calves at the outset, not when the calf weighs a half ton.   IMO, if a child isn't old or big enough to help break the calf, then it's too early for them to be showing a calf.    I'm not saying they have to do it by themself, but at least be involved when the calf is first purchased.  

...and whomever said "man up" needs to quit giving advice when a topic regards safety and young children.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2011, 07:23:42 PM by Gators Rule »

Offline LLBUX

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2011, 07:55:56 PM »
I had a steer this year that always kept his head up looking for trouble.  I broke him to lead and had washed and clipped him a few times.  I thought his troubles were over and then one day he turned on me while I led him back in after a bath.   
I barely got the rope through the hole in the feedbunk when he snorted and turned on me.    Luckily I pulled the rope while backing out and snubbed him to the feeder.  It was just too close. 
He went to the locker on the next available kill day and I have had no regrets.  My young son's health(as is your child's)

Take no chances.

Offline CAB

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2011, 07:50:13 AM »
For next year's project, ask the seller for his input as to which calves would be good for a beginner. We always have a good idea of which of our calves are going to be sweethearts and some that will take a little more experienced showman to handle. If they are around the calves like they need to be, the seller will pretty much know which calves will work for your daughter. Good luck.

Offline Jenny

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #20 on: July 11, 2011, 08:05:48 AM »
I have been involved in showing for 30 + years; I have seen this more than a few times in the ring, where a big fat steer will take his little beginner showman; I have never seen a heifer do this; don't know why that would be.

those calves just learn that the little person is afraid and they will take full advantage of that situation.  I would NEVER allow one of my kids to be traumatized like that.  to a previous poster, NO, it is not time for the "kid to learn"; imagine if you will if you were leading an animal that had it in mind to attack you and the size of the animal was in proportion to to you what the size is in proportion to your little beginner showman.......it would be frightening.

another idea for next year is to buy a calf that is pretty well broke or has already been shown by a junior.  we always have a few of those on our fall sale as we have four kids in 4-H and they show the spring born calander year calves at our county fair.

sometimes you will get lucky and find a calf that will almost look after a small showman.

Offline SIMMGAL

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2011, 10:20:25 AM »
As many of you have said, many times it means selecting for docility. We have seen many heifers that we have liked that look very flashy and sound, but many times their attitudes aren't that great... We have learned (the hard way) that we would rather have a docile animal than a mean one that tries to run you out of the pen. I have broken animals that can have a bit of a temper, but they are still very unpredictable regardless of the amount of time spent working with them, and they almost finished me with showing. I took a Simmental with a 'tude to NAILE, and after having to rely on us for feed and water for two weeks, she straightened out, but she still would be grouchy. Sometimes the amount of work that you have to put into them just isn't worth it. I started out with the calmest thing in VA, which was Herefords, and when I moved into commercial and Simmental, I had to deal with irritating animals with atitudes. I clearly remember thinking that if I had started out with animals that I was afraid of, then I would most likely not be showing today. You made a SMART call by sending him out, especially when your child's future show career, and more importantly, her health and safety were in danger.  (thumbsup)
« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 10:22:07 AM by Simmgal »
Money can't buy happiness, but it can buy cattle and that's pretty much the same thing as far as I'm concerned!

Simmental and SimAngus bulls available year-round!

Offline Honkomp

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #22 on: July 11, 2011, 04:12:58 PM »
I am very thankful for everyone's input...again.  I have a locker date after the County fair and will keep it.  In the mean time Madison I have been working the "red method" to try to calm this steer down and increase Maddie's confidence.  This seems to be working for both animal and Child.  We were in town on Sunday and walking into a store I asked her what she was going to do with her steer.  She wants to take him to the fair, but reserves the right to not go into the ring with him.  I guess that this is a win for her.   ;D  (clapping) When I had originally posted, Madison was not interested in even petting the steer.  Last night she and I were in the pen with him and petting and leading him.  She was tickled when he licked her hand and made no attempt to chase her.  <party> Of course, I took CABs advice and let Maddie carry her t-ball bat with her in the pen.
There is nothing as good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse.  Winston Churchill

Offline cownerd

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Re: Daughter's Steer tries to take her ... any quick fixes?
« Reply #23 on: July 11, 2011, 05:09:15 PM »
Tie him up when you feed him.

 

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