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Offline aj

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2018, 08:59:45 AM »
I googled around trying to find out if bison have genetic defects. I did hear one rumor of a condition malformed rear legs on bison thought to be genetic. Could it be that Deerpark Improver was used in a beefalo program........?? Naw.....it can't be.
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.


Offline knabe

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2018, 11:37:57 AM »
I googled around trying to find out if bison have genetic defects.


everything has defects.  no need to bad mouth anything.

Offline aj

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2018, 04:02:17 PM »
Interesting. I know years back I sent in a bull's sample for th. It came back clean but a little different. The bull sired a th calf. My bull.......was a twin......and I guess this somehow goofed up the th test somehow.
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Online cbcr

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2018, 10:03:32 AM »
I have noticed in some of the dairy pedigrees that there are animals that show up as carriers even if both parents have been tested and are free.

It may be that for the most part the test may show that an animal is not a carrier, but as with anything if everything happens to align just right an animal can show up as a carrier.

Nothing is 100%

Offline aj

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2018, 09:00:33 AM »
As I understand it.......very few pure "bison bison" exist. This is because their numbers got so low that cattle were used to help get numbers up via the beefalo's and what not. There are a few small......pure herds being established. So.......in conclusion.....theoretically you could have a th inflicted buffalo calf? A ds inflicted buffalo calf? Etc etc
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Offline Okotoks

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2018, 11:16:35 AM »
Here are a couple of Bison we saw at Elk Island Park on a drive through last September. They evidently have a herd of Plains Bison and herd of Wood Bison but I have no idea which herd was in the section we drove through. There were several bulls along the road and a larger herd of cows and calves in one group and a group of young bulls in another. I'm not sure if a genetic defect would survive in relatively small herds. It should certainly show up if it existed.

Offline oakview

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2018, 11:36:16 AM »
We all should be using those bulls.  They are certainly "wedge shaped."

Offline knabe

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2018, 02:11:17 AM »
Not quite deep enough.

Offline Cabanha Santa Isabel - BR

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Re: Genetic defects
« Reply #24 on: January 02, 2019, 06:06:45 AM »
Here are a couple of Bison we saw at Elk Island Park on a drive through last September. They evidently have a herd of Plains Bison and herd of Wood Bison but I have no idea which herd was in the section we drove through. There were several bulls along the road and a larger herd of cows and calves in one group and a group of young bulls in another. I'm not sure if a genetic defect would survive in relatively small herds. It should certainly show up if it existed.

On nature....a deformed calf is a easy dinner for wolves.
Natural selection.
Not necessary use a pedigree bull carrier only for fashion, or worst, a non informed carrier!

 

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