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Author Topic: Hardiest cattle breed  (Read 7410 times)

Offline JTM

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2011, 10:20:32 PM »
Ummm, Black Angus?
Functional, real world Shorthorns are the answer for hybrid vigor on Angus cattle. Increase marbling and maternal traits while creating superior cows and adding more pounds to your calves at weaning.

Offline Dvrom

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2011, 10:46:08 PM »
Ummm, Black Angus?
yeah i think i agree with you we used to raise angus and we had a bunch calving into the early to mid 20's

Offline Mark H

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2011, 11:51:46 PM »
The hardiest breed depends on the environment you are going to put the animal in.  Generally all adoptable breeds are smaller and not high production oriented.
In northern and temperate climates generally the British hair breeds are the most hearty.  Breeds like the Galloway, Welsh Black, and Luing stand up well in cold, wet, and windy weather.  They also have resistance to black flies and mosquitos due to their dense thick hair.
In tropical environments the Brahman only has one competitor: the Sanga breeds like the Tuli.  In my opinion the Bos Indicus breeds area tougher lot than the Sanga based cattle.  The florida Cracker also deserves mention here.
In dry warm climates Ceole breeds like the Longhorn is tough to beat.  Note that in Latin America many different Longhorn type breeds exist. 

Offline afhm

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2011, 08:29:49 AM »
Beefmasters can thrive in the cold and the heat.  They are about 1/2 hereford and shorthorn so they will hair up good.  They were built on being a maternal breed and will have some of the biggest udders next to dairy breeds.

Offline Freerider

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2011, 10:18:24 AM »
I would have to say Scottish Highlands for the cold climates, up here in Canada they can survive the winters by digging for weeds, sticks and bark. Due to their multiple long coats of hair they don't need high energy diets to fatten up for the winter and they don't even need shelter. They're well known for producing into their 20's, constantly spitting out 50lbs calves.


Offline TJ

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2011, 11:59:27 AM »
Ummm, Black Angus?

I raise Lowline Black Angus (full & crosses) & I really like them, but the answer, IMHO, is... "NO" & they "aint" even close to being the hardiest.

Again, my vote is Longhorn or Scotch Highland, and it all depends upon the location as to which one.  IMHO, Tuli, Tarentaise & Galloways would rank fairly high too.    
« Last Edit: June 08, 2011, 12:02:11 PM by TJ »
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Offline HAB

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2011, 02:50:48 PM »
Ummm, Black Angus?
yeah i think i agree with you we used to raise angus and we had a bunch calving into the early to mid 20's

Our Galloways blow our Angus out of the water, when it comes to hardiness, both summer and winter.  Our Angus cattle originated in N.D. also, but have been culling themselves regularly.  Our 1/2 blood Galloways run right with the fullblood Galloways, I think due to the hybrid vigor.  Treating Galloway calves for any illness is uncommon.  I am sure Highlanders are similar, I just don't like horns, and want more performance.

HAB 
Galloways- The breed to produce the hardier crossbred cow.

Offline Mark H

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2011, 07:08:26 PM »
Composites based on British hair breeds tend to be the hardiest cattle in colder climates.  Breeds like the Luing (Shorthorn/Highland) and the U of A Synthetic (Angus/Charolais/ Galloway) have been shown to be at least as hardy as Herfords, Highlands, or Galloways.  These composite lines also benefit from hybrid vigor and more objective systematic selection than in the hair breeds.
In the UK the hair breeds are being crossed with Fleckvieh to produce commercial cows that are very popular f0rr crossing to a terminal sire.
This brings up a question for HAB: Why can't Galloway breeders produce their own composite like the U of A synthetic to get the advantages of the Galloway and the other breed like the Simmental?

Offline HAB

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2011, 07:33:04 PM »
Composites based on British hair breeds tend to be the hardiest cattle in colder climates.  Breeds like the Luing (Shorthorn/Highland) and the U of A Synthetic (Angus/Charolais/ Galloway) have been shown to be at least as hardy as Herfords, Highlands, or Galloways.  These composite lines also benefit from hybrid vigor and more objective systematic selection than in the hair breeds.
In the UK the hair breeds are being crossed with Fleckvieh to produce commercial cows that are very popular f0rr crossing to a terminal sire.
This brings up a question for HAB: Why can't Galloway breeders produce their own composite like the U of A synthetic to get the advantages of the Galloway and the other breed like the Simmental?
Mark H - We Galloway breeders missed the boat to an extent.  We saw what was happening to the other breeds, with the loss of many of their original characteristics, and got gun shy.  We have had some temporary breeders try to change how we registered Galloway cattle.  They wanted breed up programs and percentage purebreds.   We wanted to maintain our fullblood cattle, due to the limited bloodlines available.  We are a stubborn bunch, small in number, and didn't want to lose control of  "our breed".  In the US, we have started having percentage (50%)  females and steers show in conjunction with our association sanctioned shows.  We do not maintain a registry of those at this time.  As a result, I know the associations have suffered financially, but just like our THRIFTY cattle, we have survived the tough times, and are seeing a resurgence in interest, because we are a true outcross.

HAB       
Galloways- The breed to produce the hardier crossbred cow.

Offline outlawcattlecompany

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Re: Hardiest cattle breed
« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2011, 08:48:38 PM »
There are herds of Santa Gertrudis in Canada, New York state, Ohio, and Indiana so to say they won't work in cold climates is a false statement. Many people discount American cattle but I post much higher weaning weights than many commercial crossbreed producers in my area.

 

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