Steer Planet - Show Steers and Club Calves Forum

Steer Planet Chat => The Big Show => Topic started by: CattleWiz on December 22, 2011, 12:34:22 PM

Title: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: CattleWiz on December 22, 2011, 12:34:22 PM
A lot of people post pictures of their animals on SP asking for opinions and feed back. I, along with some others have a hard time understanding what members opinions mean by the words/terms used. Like recently I asked what the term "soggy" was not knowing exactly what people meant by this term. I would like members help in creating a good list of Terms and their definitions that others can resort to when they don't quite understand a term being used. Thanks in advance for your help!
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 22, 2011, 12:54:13 PM
here.

It's going to be hard to actually come up with a list...  I have found it works better to ask about a specific term that you may not know about...  This is the time folks...

The other thing about blanket terms, and defining them-- what one thing means to one person, might mean something different to another.  

For instance, I say that's a stout animal- One person would read 'stout' as meaning big boned, huge footed, wide based, etc... and someone else will consider stout as meaning thick bodied, big assed, deep quartered, bold and wide through the chest floor, etc.  Simpilly put.. one term that when used alone can mean tons of things...

The thing that gets me, and really helps me determine if the person spitting out terms knows what they're talking about, or if they just heard it once.. is the adjectives and descriptions that they use in conjunction with that term... Like above..." That heifer sure is stout- I really like her substance of bone, foot size,and rear view muscle expression...

The other thing that really pops my bubble is when someone says.  "That heifer sure looks sound".. How can you tell she looks sound?  How about commenting on her appeared angles of front shoulder slope, foot/ pastern length/ slope, rear hock set, hooks to pins slope, tailhead angle, topline, head carriage, etc....

Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 22, 2011, 12:55:36 PM
Soggy - big bellied, deep bodied, proper to heavier conditioned, soft, easy feeding looking
              (I stole this from a previous topic that BS shared!)

Thanks for posting that pic BS
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 22, 2011, 01:05:35 PM
Soggy - big bellied, deep bodied, proper to heavier conditioned, soft, easy feeding looking
              (I stole this from a previous topic that BS shared!)

Thanks for posting that pic BS
nota prob... reread my post now. ETA.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: SIMMGAL on December 22, 2011, 02:34:57 PM
This is a good idea. It would make things easier if everyone had a general idea of what people were talking about!!  <rock>
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 22, 2011, 07:19:19 PM
What are some good meanings for Stout? I have a fairly good idea but having a hard time putting it into terms
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: SIMMGAL on December 22, 2011, 07:24:08 PM
What are some good meanings for Stout? I have a fairly good idea but having a hard time putting it into terms
Well, when I think of a stout animal, I picture an animal with an average or below average frame score that is pretty beefy and muscular. Kinda like someone you would want to be on your side if there was a barfight... <beer>

Not sure if everyone agrees on this though..
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: Shadow Hill Farm on December 22, 2011, 08:01:44 PM
Here is a link that you can go to as well. May help you out a bit. When we got back into cattle I forgot some of the stuff and found this. It has helped me. It doesn't cover terms like soggy and such but has everything else. Hope it helps. I'm always willing to learn more stuff.

http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S (http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S)
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: SIMMGAL on December 22, 2011, 08:06:09 PM
Here is a link that you can go to as well. May help you out a bit. When we got back into cattle I forgot some of the stuff and found this. It has helped me. It doesn't cover terms like soggy and such but has everything else. Hope it helps. I'm always willing to learn more stuff.

[url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url] ([url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url])


Very helpful!  <rock>
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: Shadow Hill Farm on December 22, 2011, 08:10:06 PM
Here is a link that you can go to as well. May help you out a bit. When we got back into cattle I forgot some of the stuff and found this. It has helped me. It doesn't cover terms like soggy and such but has everything else. Hope it helps. I'm always willing to learn more stuff.

[url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url] ([url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url])


Very helpful!  <rock>


Your Welcome! :)  <beer>
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 22, 2011, 09:34:27 PM
Here is a link that you can go to as well. May help you out a bit. When we got back into cattle I forgot some of the stuff and found this. It has helped me. It doesn't cover terms like soggy and such but has everything else. Hope it helps. I'm always willing to learn more stuff.

[url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url] ([url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url])


Helped a lot thanks!
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 22, 2011, 09:38:37 PM
here.

It's going to be hard to actually come up with a list...  I have found it works better to ask about a specific term that you may not know about...  This is the time folks...


You were right..I think I'll look through previous threads and make a list of commonly used terms that people might not understand.
I want a thread I can reference back too later on a long with other members
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: Shadow Hill Farm on December 22, 2011, 09:42:26 PM
Here is a link that you can go to as well. May help you out a bit. When we got back into cattle I forgot some of the stuff and found this. It has helped me. It doesn't cover terms like soggy and such but has everything else. Hope it helps. I'm always willing to learn more stuff.

[url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url] ([url]http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/#S[/url])


Helped a lot thanks!


Your welcome!  <cowboy>
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: knabe on December 22, 2011, 10:25:38 PM
capacious
pounds heavy
heavy footed
roomy middled
broken over in the knew
weak in the loin
breaks in the chine
wasty middled
goose fronted
cute headed
post legged
high pins
flat boned
round boned
flat ribbed
pone fat
carries through to twist
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 23, 2011, 01:52:02 AM
Thanks Knabe thats a good list.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 23, 2011, 07:55:23 AM
What are some good meanings for Stout? I have a fairly good idea but having a hard time putting it into terms
My post about two above, can conclude all terms that can mean stout...
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 23, 2011, 07:59:25 AM
Here is some terms, not really what you are wanting... in terms of definitions.

This isn't the list I was looking for- or wanting to find... but it will work.. I have a much better one at home (parents), that I will get over new year's weekend to post...
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 23, 2011, 08:36:48 AM
Here is some terms, not really what you are wanting... in terms of definitions.

This isn't the list I was looking for- or wanting to find... but it will work.. I have a much better one at home (parents), that I will get over new year's weekend to post...

The PDF is a really good list of terms. Please do post the one from your parents
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 23, 2011, 02:20:03 PM
Top
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: SIMMGAL on December 23, 2011, 02:29:21 PM
In addition to Knabe's list, some other terms I frequently hear are: Breaks behind the shoulders and tight through the heart girth. I'm trying to think of others!   ???


ADDED: I have also heard fat cattle being called toady.  (lol)
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 23, 2011, 05:29:56 PM
here's one...

fluid in her movement
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 24, 2011, 01:45:07 PM
staggy crest
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 25, 2011, 07:48:51 AM
: I have also heard fat cattle being called toady.  (lol)
everything can be toady...
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: outspoken on December 28, 2011, 07:50:45 AM
new list of terms attached...

more available upon request.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 28, 2011, 08:52:49 AM
Thanks for the new terms!
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: vc on December 28, 2011, 09:27:27 AM
At 12 o'clock
balanced
tubie
green
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on December 31, 2011, 11:06:30 AM
capacious - Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal)
pounds heavy
heavy footed - Heavy and slow in movement
roomy middled
broken over in the knew
weak in the loin - Thin topped , bad top (middle of the back)
breaks in the chine - Breaks in the back (curve in the back)
wasty middled
goose fronted
cute headed
post legged
high pins
flat boned
round boned
flat ribbed
pone fat - The fat deposited on either side of the tail 
carries through to twist


I started looking up some of these terms. They might not be exactly what is meant by the cattle industry.
I also added a good picture of a Pone fat picture (scroll down to page 10)
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on September 03, 2012, 01:40:47 AM
Can anyone help with filling more of these terms in?

Capacious - Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal)
Pounds Heavy
Heavy Footed - Heavy and slow in movement
Roomy Middled
Broken over in the knew
Weak in the loin - Thin topped , bad top (middle of the back)
Breaks in the chine - Breaks in the back (curve in the back)
Wasty Middled
Goose Fronted
Cute Headed
Post Legged
High Pins
Flat Boned
Round Boned
Flat Ribbed
Pone Fat - The fat deposited on either side of the tail 
Carries through to twist
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: Boot Jack Bulls on September 03, 2012, 05:24:53 AM
Can anyone help with filling more of these terms in?

Capacious - Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal)
Pounds Heavy
Heavy Footed - Heavy and slow in movement
Roomy Middled -Big barreled, lots of spring in ribs, capacious
Broken over in the knew
Weak in the loin - Thin topped , bad top (middle of the back)
Breaks in the chine - Breaks in the back (curve in the back)
Wasty Middled
Goose Fronted-rocket fronted, choke neck, clean neck and throat latch without excessive leather or skin
Cute Headed
Post Legged
High Pinned

Flat Boned-Cannon bones appear to be more flat than round when viewed from profile
Round Boned
Flat Ribbed
Pone Fat - The fat deposited on either side of the tail 
Carries through to twist-adequate amount of muscle down the back and inside of hind leg

Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: leanbeef on September 03, 2012, 10:49:00 AM
Terminology & lingo is a part of every business, every organization, every community...regardless of what you do, make, raise or sell. If you want to be effective in your communication with others, it's important to know & understand that terminolog, and that includes fad slang that might be open to some level of interpretation. It's also important to use words and phrases that DESCRIBE what you mean rather than throwing out vague terms you heard somewhere & think sounds cool. I'm not sure how or when "soggy" became a part of our lingo, but it's pretty descriptive & it's widely used. We prob didn't really need that word to describe cattle back in the 80s because they just weren't!

If you have the opportunity, I suggest taking a look at beef cattle judging or evaluation clinics, workshops or classes, especially if you're in school or in college. You'll learn the terms and phrases you need to compare and describe cattle, and you'll get better at evaluation and selection. I was lucky to get recruited to judge on a college team by one of the best livestock evaluators in the country, and I really enjoyed it. I still have to keep up, because trends and terms are constantly changing, but not in terms of definitions or meaning. I get to describe cattle almost every day now, and you have to learn to be accurate in what you see and effective in describing it.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: knabe on September 03, 2012, 11:09:49 AM
Can anyone help with filling more of these terms in?

Capacious - Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal)
Pounds Heavy -  they are shorter but weigh more than taller cattle and because volume weighs more than height, they are deceptively heavier
Heavy Footed - Heavy and slow in movement  - big footed
Roomy Middled -Big barreled, lots of spring in ribs, capacious
Broken over in the knee   (knew was mis-spelled)  they just buckle over in the knee, no one says it, it's just an indication of lameness
Weak in the loin - Thin topped , bad top (middle of the back)
Breaks in the chine - Breaks in the back (curve in the back)
Wasty Middled - an indication of unfitness, loosey skinned, fatty look, kinda like the rear end of an expecting cow
Goose Fronted-rocket fronted, choke neck, clean neck and throat latch without excessive leather or skin
Cute Headed  - short muzzled like irish whiskey cattle, usually means earlier maturing
Post Legged  - legs are straight like TH cattle
High Pinned--  pin bones are too high.  can lead to inadequate cleanliness in the feminine parts and supposedly make it more difficult to calve

Flat Boned-Cannon bones appear to be more flat than round when viewed from profile
Round Boned  -  see flat boned
Flat Ribbed   -  flatter in that area, sometimes fooled by cattle being just fat
Pone Fat - The fat deposited on either side of the tail 
Carries through to twist-adequate amount of muscle down the back and inside of hind leg  -  just means they carry lower between their legs.  poplar haven red alert was the first fullblood that supposedly did this.  too bad, he was notorious for no milk and his use was quickly curtailed.  he is still in a lot of popular bloodlines, i.e. sooner.


some of the terms i listed above are from the 80's and are probably not used much anymore.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: leanbeef on September 03, 2012, 12:38:12 PM
Ok...umm...not exactly.

Capacity refers to volume. Volume equals length x width x height (depth). So when we talk about capacity, we're talking about the amount of volume as measured by the internal dimension, evaluating an animal's body length, body width & body depth.

When we say an animal is "pounds heavy" it just means they weigh more. If we have the ability to weigh the animal, this becomes definitive, not subjective. If we don't have scales--and often we don't--it's important to learn to estimate weight and differences in performance. The one that weighs the most is the pounds heavy calf.

I'm not sure about "heavy footed". That's one I've never heard and frankly I'm not sure what it means or that it's the best way to describe whatever it means. If it's heavy boned or big footed, then say heavy boned or big footed. We don't weigh feet.

"Weak loined" means exactly what it says...weak in the top over theoin area. This animal appears to have a sway in their back, as opposed to a strong or straight top which is straight from the top of the shoulder to the curve of the tail head. These animals are usually loose structured and still sounder made than cattle that "bow their top" which tend to be straighter off both ends and have less flex to the hock, knee and pastern.

"Post legged" means there is little or no set to the hock. The back legs appear very straight, and the animal tends to swing the hind leg from the hip instead of flexing the hock to move forward. Picture yourself walking without bending your knee... The opposite of post legged is sickle hocked, when there is too much set to the hock joint.

High pinned (I'm not sure I've ever heard one described this way) but would mean the pin bones are set higher than the hook bones, giving the hip an upward appearance as opposed to being level from hooks to pins (desirable) or dropping in her pins. From a production standpoint, a sloped hip does make more sense because the calf comes out in a downward direction. Cattle that slope badly from hooks to pins tend to have more slope to other angles including shoulders and pasterns and might also tend to have more set to the hock. Everything is connected!

Flat ribbed is the same as being "slab sided" meaning they lack the desired shape to the rib which lends to having more volume or internal width. It doesn't necessarily make one shallow or short which are other indicators that an animal lacks volume and capacity...those are different, though. Slab sided cattle are typically also lighter muscled and narrow based, but I don't suppose that is automatically the case.

Hope that helps a little.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: knabe on September 03, 2012, 01:18:11 PM
 vol is not l x w x h if there are curved surfaces.  If it were cattle would be a box

The rounder they are in their rib, chest floor, deeper in their twist, neck, the more volume they have.

The volume of a cube is overestimated compared to a sphere ( many sources document this)

Sometimes it's odd for people to see cattle walk across a scale and have a weight guessing game. Same with newborns.

it's difficult to evaluate volume when looking at cattle in the side profile only.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CMB on September 03, 2012, 04:47:11 PM
true skeletal width.
 
I hear this more in the hog deal but have heard Dan Hoge use it several times at cattle shows.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: Dozer45 on September 03, 2012, 09:00:53 PM
Is goose necked used as a pos. or neg. term?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on September 03, 2012, 10:15:42 PM
I always thought it was a positive thing..I could be wrong though.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: leanbeef on September 03, 2012, 11:51:41 PM
Is goose necked used as a pos. or neg. term?


LOL. That made me laugh. I'm personally not a fan of what I call the pencil necked females. Too often they're too tight hearted and hard doing to suit me. I don't mind a little front end...I think those are the cattle that have some grow in em, but I guess some people don't like to look at em. I don't mind a pretty fronted one if she's soft middled...it's just hard to make em like that sometimes.

The term goose necked sure doesn't sound very flattering, does it? lol
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: Boot Jack Bulls on September 04, 2012, 12:55:58 AM
Is goose necked used as a pos. or neg. term?


LOL. That made me laugh. I'm personally not a fan of what I call the pencil necked females. Too often they're too tight hearted and hard doing to suit me. I don't mind a little front end...I think those are the cattle that have some grow in em, but I guess some people don't like to look at em. I don't mind a pretty fronted one if she's soft middled...it's just hard to make em like that sometimes.

The term goose necked sure doesn't sound very flattering, does it? lol

I agree that these two traits don't often come in the same package. I would rather have an animal that is a little wastey on the front and has a deeper and wider heart girth than a super trim front end with a pinched heart girth. Some of our best doing and producing females have some extra mass in the front third.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: leanbeef on September 04, 2012, 03:20:23 PM
I find a lot of Simmental cattle will have some front end as calves, but then they grow in to that in time. We've had a number of cattle that appear pretty waste as calves or weanlings, and by the time they're yearlings or 2-year-olds, they almost look like different animal. A lot of other breeds are a little different...it's just something I accept because I'd rather have rib and volume and easy doing over "goosey-fronted" any day. I don't think we have to settle for downright ugly, though...I'm just not real hard on em for being heavier fronted, especially if they have time & look like the kind that'll grow into it. I like em pretty well enough...it's just not the most important thing to me.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: kidsandkows on September 04, 2012, 04:18:02 PM
Great thread! I know a lot of these terms (or what they mean to me), but it is interesting to hear others describe them. Several have been described better than was described to me when i first learned the terms, much simpler. These threads are why SP is so cool.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on September 04, 2012, 06:25:56 PM
Great thread! I know a lot of these terms (or what they mean to me), but it is interesting to hear others describe them. Several have been described better than was described to me when i first learned the terms, much simpler. These threads are why SP is so cool.

This is exactly why I created this thread!! Glad people are getting something out of it
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on September 05, 2012, 01:55:03 PM
I cleaned up the list a little. There are some terms left blank b.c i'm not sure how to describe them.. Not everyone will agree with the terms but they are all from SP members..Feel free to add your own definition.


Breaks in the Chine: Breaks in the back (curve in the back)

Broken over in the knee: They just buckle over in the knee, no one says it, is just an indication of lameness

Body Condition Score:  A score on a scale of 1 to 9, reflecting the amount of fat reserves in a cow's body, where 1 = very thin and 9 = extremely fat.

Calving Ease Score: A numerical score quantifying calving ease, ranging from 1 for an easy, unassisted calving through 5 for an abnormal presentation.

Capacious: Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal)

Carries through to Twist: Adequate amount of muscle down the back and inside of

Cute Headed: Short muzzled (like Irish whiskey cattle), usually means earlier maturing

Embryo Transfer:  Removing fertilized ova (embryos) from one cow (the donor), generally in response to hormone-induced superovulation, and placing these embryos into other cows (the recipients). More calves can be obtained from cows of superior breeding value by this technique

F1:  Offspring resulting from the mating of a purebred (straight-bred) bull to purebred (straight-bred) females of another breed.

Flat Ribbed: is the same as being "slab sided" meaning they lack the desired shape to the rib which lends to having more volume or internal width. It doesn't necessarily make one shallow or short, which are other indicators that an animal lacks volume and capacity...those are different, though. Slab sided cattle are typically also lighter muscled and narrow based, but I don't suppose that is automatically the case.
Flat Boned: Cannon bones appear to be more flat than round when viewed from profile
Freemartin:  Female born twin to a bull calf (approximately 9 out of10 will be infertile).

Green:

Goose Necked/Fronted: Rocket fronted, choke neck, clean necked and throat latch, without excessive leather or skin

Heavy Footed: Heavy and slow in movement, big footed

High Pinned: Pin bones are set higher than the hook bones, giving the hip an upward appearance as opposed to being level from hooks to pins (desirable) or dropping in her pins. From a production standpoint, a sloped hip does make more sense because the calf comes out in a downward direction. Cattle that slope badly from hooks to pins tend to have more slope to other angles including shoulders and pasterns and might also tend to have more set to the hock. Everything is connected!

Hind Leg: They carry lower between their legs.  Poplar haven red alert was the first fullblood that supposedly did this.  Too bad, he was notorious for no milk and his use was quickly curtailed.  He is still in a lot of popular bloodlines, i.e. sooner.

Maintenance Energy Requirement:  The amount of feed energy required per day by an animal to maintain its body weight and support necessary metabolic functions.

Maternal EPD:  An EPD representing the effect of the genes of an individual's daughters on the trait of interest. A calving ease maternal EPD, for example, represents the ease with which an individual daughters calve are born. See also Direct EPD.

Outbreeding (Outcrossing): Mating together of animals that are not closely related. Mild outbreeding is illustrated by mating cows to a sire of their own breed but who is not closely related to them. Such outcrossing may widen the genetic base in a herd and reduce inbreeding accumulation. A higher level of outcrossing is illustrated by crossing two Bos taurus breeds. This generally would result in beneficial heterosis for economically important traits.
Ovulation:  Release of the female germ cell (egg or ovum) by the ovary. Cows usually ovulate several hours (up to 15 hours) after the end of estrus or standing heat.

Palatability:  Acceptable to the taste or sufficiently agreeable in flavor to be eaten.

Parturition: The act of giving birth; calving.

Pedigree:  A tabulation of names of an individual's ancestors, usually only those of the three to five closest generations. Pedigree information is used to establish genetic relationships among individuals to use in genetic evaluations.

Pone Fat: The fat deposited on either side of the tail. Tail pones are useful in predicting quality grade in all cattle, especially dairy and exotic breeds. Animals showing no fat deposits on either side of the tail head should be considered for the standard quality grade. Select quality grade will show only small amounts of pone fat (about the size of a tennis ball) and choice grade cattle will show moderate amounts of pone fat (about the size of a soft ball).

Phenotype:  The visible or measurable expression of a character; weaning weight, post wean gain, or reproduction for example. For most traits, phenotype is influenced by both genotype and environment. The relative degree to which phenotypic variation among individuals is caused by transmissible genetic effects is the heritability of a trait

Polled: Naturally hornless cattle. Having no horns or scurs.

Postpartum Interval:  The number of days between parturition (Birth) and the first postpartum estrus (First Heat after Birth).

Post legged: Little or no set to the hock. The back legs appear very straight, and the animal tends to swing the hind leg from the hip instead of flexing the hock to move forward. Picture yourself walking without bending your knee... The opposite of post legged is sickle hocked, when there is too much set to the hock joint.

Progeny: The young, or offspring, of the parents.

Pounds Heavy: They are shorter but weigh more than taller cattle and because volume weighs more than height, they are deceptively heavier

Pounds Heavy: Means they weigh more. If we have the ability to weigh the animal, this becomes definitive, not subjective. If we don't have scales--and often we don't--it's important to learn to estimate weight and differences in performance. The one that weighs the most is the pounds heavy calf.

Roomy Middled: Big barreled, lots of spring in ribs, capacious

Soggy: big bellied, deep bodied, proper to heavier conditioned, soft, easy feeding looking

Stout animal: Ex.1 Big boned, huge footed, wide based, etc.
Ex.2 Thick bodied, big assed, deep quartered, bold and wide through the chest floor, etc.

Scrotal circumference: A measure of testes size obtained by measuring the distance around the testicles in the scrotum with a circular tape. Related to semen producing capacity and age at puberty of female sibs and progeny.

Scurs:  Horny tissue or rudimentary horns that are attached to the skin rather than the bony parts of the head

Super Ovulation: Process by which a cow is treated with reproductive hormones to induce her to produce more eggs than normal. (Used in Flushing Cows)

True Skeletal Width:

Wasty Middled: An indication of unfitness, loosey skinned, fatty look, kind of like the rear end of an expecting cow.

Weak Loined: Weak in the top over the loin area(middle of back). This animal appears to have a sway in their back, as opposed to a strong or straight top, which is straight from the top of the shoulder to the curve of the tail head. These animals are usually loose structured and still sounder made than cattle that "bow their top" which tend to be straighter off both ends and have less flex to the hock, knee and pastern.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: leanbeef on September 05, 2012, 08:15:05 PM
"Green" generally means "not ready". It often refers to body condition...if a calf is lean or lacking condition, we'd say the calf is "green". The term is also used to describe cattle that are "green broke" meaning they've been started on halter, but need more work.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: RR#2 Cattle Co on September 05, 2012, 09:37:36 PM
Twist = round or bottom round.  More appropriate for lambs, but could do in a pinch for steers.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: CAB on September 06, 2012, 09:31:07 AM
There you go, everyone here needs a handbag!! Right?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: CattleWiz on September 06, 2012, 09:33:43 AM
Not Just any hand Bag, a Coach Hand Bag lol
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Jason on September 07, 2012, 11:36:58 AM
Good work on the list, will sticky it for a while.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: CattleWiz on September 07, 2012, 05:28:31 PM
I cleaned up the list a little. There are some terms left blank b.c i'm not sure how to describe them.. Not everyone will agree with the terms but they are all from SP members..Feel free to add your own definition.


Breaks in the Chine: Breaks in the back (curve in the back)

Broken over in the knee: They just buckle over in the knee, no one says it, is just an indication of lameness

Body Condition Score:  A score on a scale of 1 to 9, reflecting the amount of fat reserves in a cow's body, where 1 = very thin and 9 = extremely fat.

Calving Ease Score: A numerical score quantifying calving ease, ranging from 1 for an easy, unassisted calving through 5 for an abnormal presentation.

Capacious: Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal)

Carries through to Twist: Adequate amount of muscle down the back and inside of

Cute Headed: Short muzzled (like Irish whiskey cattle), usually means earlier maturing

Embryo Transfer:  Removing fertilized ova (embryos) from one cow (the donor), generally in response to hormone-induced superovulation, and placing these embryos into other cows (the recipients). More calves can be obtained from cows of superior breeding value by this technique

F1:  Offspring resulting from the mating of a purebred (straight-bred) bull to purebred (straight-bred) females of another breed.

Flat Ribbed: is the same as being "slab sided" meaning they lack the desired shape to the rib which lends to having more volume or internal width. It doesn't necessarily make one shallow or short, which are other indicators that an animal lacks volume and capacity...those are different, though. Slab sided cattle are typically also lighter muscled and narrow based, but I don't suppose that is automatically the case.

Flat Boned: Cannon bones appear to be more flat than round when viewed from profile

Freemartin:  Female born twin to a bull calf (approximately 9 out of10 will be infertile).

Green: Generally means "not ready". It often refers to body condition...if a calf is lean or lacking condition, we'd say the calf is "green". The term is also used to describe cattle that are "green broke" meaning they've been started on halter, but need more work.

Goose Necked/Fronted: Rocket fronted, choke neck, clean necked and throat latch, without excessive leather or skin

Heavy Footed: Heavy and slow in movement, big footed

High Pinned: Pin bones are set higher than the hook bones, giving the hip an upward appearance as opposed to being level from hooks to pins (desirable) or dropping in her pins. From a production standpoint, a sloped hip does make more sense because the calf comes out in a downward direction. Cattle that slope badly from hooks to pins tend to have more slope to other angles including shoulders and pasterns and might also tend to have more set to the hock. Everything is connected!

Hind Leg: They carry lower between their legs.  Poplar haven red alert was the first fullblood that supposedly did this.  Too bad, he was notorious for no milk and his use was quickly curtailed.  He is still in a lot of popular bloodlines, i.e. sooner.

Maintenance Energy Requirement:  The amount of feed energy required per day by an animal to maintain its body weight and support necessary metabolic functions.

Maternal EPD:  An EPD representing the effect of the genes of an individual's daughters on the trait of interest. A calving ease maternal EPD, for example, represents the ease with which an individual daughters calve are born. See also Direct EPD.

Outbreeding (Outcrossing): Mating together of animals that are not closely related. Mild outbreeding is illustrated by mating cows to a sire of their own breed but who is not closely related to them. Such outcrossing may widen the genetic base in a herd and reduce inbreeding accumulation. A higher level of outcrossing is illustrated by crossing two Bos taurus breeds. This generally would result in beneficial heterosis for economically important traits.
Ovulation:  Release of the female germ cell (egg or ovum) by the ovary. Cows usually ovulate several hours (up to 15 hours) after the end of estrus or standing heat.

Palatability:  Acceptable to the taste or sufficiently agreeable in flavor to be eaten.

Parturition: The act of giving birth; calving.

Pedigree:  A tabulation of names of an individual's ancestors, usually only those of the three to five closest generations. Pedigree information is used to establish genetic relationships among individuals to use in genetic evaluations.

Pone Fat: The fat deposited on either side of the tail. Tail pones are useful in predicting quality grade in all cattle, especially dairy and exotic breeds. Animals showing no fat deposits on either side of the tail head should be considered for the standard quality grade. Select quality grade will show only small amounts of pone fat (about the size of a tennis ball) and choice grade cattle will show moderate amounts of pone fat (about the size of a soft ball).

Phenotype:  The visible or measurable expression of a character; weaning weight, post wean gain, or reproduction for example. For most traits, phenotype is influenced by both genotype and environment. The relative degree to which phenotypic variation among individuals is caused by transmissible genetic effects is the heritability of a trait

Polled: Naturally hornless cattle. Having no horns or scurs.

Postpartum Interval:  The number of days between parturition (Birth) and the first postpartum estrus (First Heat after Birth).

Post legged: Little or no set to the hock. The back legs appear very straight, and the animal tends to swing the hind leg from the hip instead of flexing the hock to move forward. Picture yourself walking without bending your knee... The opposite of post legged is sickle hocked, when there is too much set to the hock joint.

Progeny: The young, or offspring, of the parents.

Pounds Heavy: They are shorter but weigh more than taller cattle and because volume weighs more than height, they are deceptively heavier

Pounds Heavy: Means they weigh more. If we have the ability to weigh the animal, this becomes definitive, not subjective. If we don't have scales--and often we don't--it's important to learn to estimate weight and differences in performance. The one that weighs the most is the pounds heavy calf.

Roomy Middled: Big barreled, lots of spring in ribs, capacious

Soggy: big bellied, deep bodied, proper to heavier conditioned, soft, easy feeding looking

Stout animal: Ex.1 Big boned, huge footed, wide based, etc.
Ex.2 Thick bodied, big assed, deep quartered, bold and wide through the chest floor, etc.

Scrotal circumference: A measure of testes size obtained by measuring the distance around the testicles in the scrotum with a circular tape. Related to semen producing capacity and age at puberty of female sibs and progeny.

Scurs:  Horny tissue or rudimentary horns that are attached to the skin rather than the bony parts of the head

Super Ovulation: Process by which a cow is treated with reproductive hormones to induce her to produce more eggs than normal. (Used in Flushing Cows)

True Skeletal Width:

Wasty Middled: An indication of unfitness, loosey skinned, fatty look, kind of like the rear end of an expecting cow.

Weak Loined: Weak in the top over the loin area(middle of back). This animal appears to have a sway in their back, as opposed to a strong or straight top, which is straight from the top of the shoulder to the curve of the tail head. These animals are usually loose structured and still sounder made than cattle that "bow their top" which tend to be straighter off both ends and have less flex to the hock, knee and pastern.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: TCF on September 28, 2012, 05:37:17 PM
Breaks in the Chine: Breaks in the back (curve in the back), Not a good term, chine refers to the point at the top of the shoulder where both shoulder blades or scapula's meet. terms for chine revolve around being high chinned, stale chines, open shouldered. broken topped, weak topped, sway backed refer to how cattle are not strong topped.

Broken over in the knee: They just buckle over in the knee, no one says it, is just an indication of lameness, forward at their knee, usually coexists with being straight fronted

Body Condition Score:  A score on a scale of 1 to 9, reflecting the amount of fat reserves in a cow's body, where 1 = very thin and 9 = extremely fat.

Calving Ease Score: A numerical score quantifying calving ease, ranging from 1 for an easy, unassisted calving through 5 for an abnormal presentation.

Capacious: Lots of space, room to grow (could be used to describe many aspects of an animal), do not like this word. it is much simpler to use volume, capacity. refers to body type, depth and power

Carries through to Twist: Adequate amount of muscle down the back and inside of, lower quarter can refer to this also

Cute Headed: Short muzzled (like Irish whiskey cattle), usually means earlier maturing, would rather hear a cowier term like femininity, style or refined skull

Embryo Transfer:  Removing fertilized ova (embryos) from one cow (the donor), generally in response to hormone-induced superovulation, and placing these embryos into other cows (the recipients). More calves can be obtained from cows of superior breeding value by this technique

F1:  Offspring resulting from the mating of a purebred (straight-bred) bull to purebred (straight-bred) females of another breed.

Flat Ribbed: is the same as being "slab sided" meaning they lack the desired shape to the rib which lends to having more volume or internal width. It doesn't necessarily make one shallow or short, which are other indicators that an animal lacks volume and capacity...those are different, though. Slab sided cattle are typically also lighter muscled and narrow based, but I don't suppose that is automatically the case.

Flat Boned: Cannon bones appear to be more flat than round when viewed from profile

Freemartin:  Female born twin to a bull calf (approximately 9 out of10 will be infertile).

Green: Generally means "not ready". It often refers to body condition...if a calf is lean or lacking condition, we'd say the calf is "green". The term is also used to describe cattle that are "green broke" meaning they've been started on halter, but, need more work.

Goose Necked/Fronted: Rocket fronted, choke neck, clean necked and throat latch, without excessive leather or skin. think necked, clean fronted, stylish

Heavy Footed: Heavy and slow in movement, big footedwhen i read this i think about foot size. big footed, heavy boned, stout structured

High Pinned: Pin bones are set higher than the hook bones, giving the hip an upward appearance as opposed to being level from hooks to pins (desirable) or dropping in her pins. From a production standpoint, a sloped hip does make more sense because the calf comes out in a downward direction. Cattle that slope badly from hooks to pins tend to have more slope to other angles including shoulders and pasterns and might also tend to have more set to the hock. Everything is connected!

Hind Leg: They carry lower between their legs.  Poplar haven red alert was the first fullblood that supposedly did this.  Too bad, he was notorious for no milk and his use was quickly curtailed.  He is still in a lot of popular bloodlines, i.e. sooner.

Maintenance Energy Requirement:  The amount of feed energy required per day by an animal to maintain its body weight and support necessary metabolic functions.

Maternal EPD:  An EPD representing the effect of the genes of an individuals daughters on the trait of interest. A calving ease maternal EPD, for example, represents the ease with which an individual daughters calve are born. See also Direct EPD.

Outbreeding (Outcrossing): Mating together of animals that are not closely related. Mild outbreeding is illustrated by mating cows to a sire of their own breed but who is not closely related to them. Such outcrossing may widen the genetic base in a herd and reduce inbreeding accumulation. A higher level of outcrossing is illustrated by crossing two BIOS taurus breeds. This generally would result in beneficial heterosis for economically important traits.
Ovulation:  Release of the female germ cell (egg or ovum) by the ovary. Cows usually ovulate several hours (up to 15 hours) after the end of estrus or standing heat.

Palatability:  Acceptable to the taste or sufficiently agreeable in flavor to be eaten.

Parturition: The act of giving birth; calving.

Pedigree:  A tabulation of names of an individual's ancestors, usually only those of the three to five closest generations. Pedigree information is used to establish genetic relationships among individuals to use in genetic evaluations.

Pone Fat: The fat deposited on either side of the tail. Tail pones are useful in predicting quality grade in all cattle, especially dairy and exotic breeds. Animals showing no fat deposits on either side of the tail head should be considered for the standard quality grade. Select quality grade will show only small amounts of pone fat (about the size of a tennis ball) and choice grade cattle will show moderate amounts of pone fat (about the size of a soft ball).

Phenotype:  The visible or measurable expression of a character; weaning weight, post wean gain, or reproduction for example. For most traits, phenotype is influenced by both genotype and environment. The relative degree to which phenotype variation among individuals is caused by transmissible genetic effects is the heritability of a trait

Polled: Naturally hornless cattle. Having no horns or scurs.

Postpartum Interval:  The number of days between parturition (Birth) and the first postpartum estrus (First Heat after Birth).

Post legged: Little or no set to the hock. The back legs appear very straight, and the animal tends to swing the hind leg from the hip instead of flexing the hock to move forward. Picture yourself walking without bending your knee... The opposite of post legged is sickle hocked, when there is too much set to the hock joint.

Progeny: The young, or offspring, of the parents.

Pounds Heavy: They are shorter but weigh more than taller cattle and because volume weighs more than height, they are deceptively heavier. they weight more.

Pounds Heavy: Means they weigh more. If we have the ability to weigh the animal, this becomes definitive, not subjective. If we don't have scales--and often we don't--it's important to learn to estimate weight and differences in performance. The one that weighs the most is the pounds heavy calf.

Roomy Middled: Big barreled, lots of spring in ribs, capaciousbetter terms such as spring of rib, bold ribbed, volume, capacity, shape

Soggy: big bellied, deep bodied, proper to heavier conditioned, soft, easy feeding looking i like this more bull terms. big ribbed, massive ribbed, powerful, deep

Stout animal: Ex.1 Big boned, huge footed, wide based, etc.
Ex.2 Thick bodied, big assed, deep quartered, bold and wide through the chest floor, etc.

Scrotal circumference: A measure of testes size obtained by measuring the distance around the testicles in the scrotum with a circular tape. Related to semen producing capacity and age at puberty of female sibs and progeny.

Scurs:  Horny tissue or rudimentary horns that are attached to the skin rather than the bony parts of the head

Super Ovulation: Process by which a cow is treated with reproductive hormones to induce her to produce more eggs than normal. (Used in Flushing Cows)

True Skeletal Width: how an animal is built from the ground up. true skel width is from their base width  up to their chest width, through their spring of rib and to the width over their top.

Wasty Middled: An indication of unfitness, loosey skinned, fatty look, kind of like the rear end of an expecting cow.

Weak Loined: Weak in the top over the loin area(middle of back). This animal appears to have a sway in their back, as opposed to a strong or straight top, which is straight from the top of the shoulder to the curve of the tail head. These animals are usually loose structured and still sounder made than cattle that "bow their top" which tend to be straighter off both ends and have less flex to the hock, knee and pastern.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: CattleWiz on October 01, 2012, 03:22:45 PM
Thanks for you input on the terms!
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: leanbeef on October 01, 2012, 05:05:13 PM
When I think of "stout", I think of a small framed animal (short) that still has lots of thickness, quarter, power and capacity to stand up their with the big dogs.

Stoutness really has nothing to do with frame. Stoutness can refer to muscle, to bone, or to overall mass. It can describe big framed, small framed, or medium sized cattle.

TCF... I 100% agree with your notes!
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: maineanjou87 on October 06, 2012, 06:25:58 PM
what about weak behind the shoulders i have heard that a few times thats not on your list
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: justintime on October 07, 2012, 12:30:23 AM
 A term often seen in sale catalogs is "a three in one combination". IMO, this usually means that the cow is too poor to sell on her own, so we are throwing her calf in with her, and we are also tossing in the calf she is carrying as we really hope someone will bid on her so that we don't have to take this fence crawling b***h back home again.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: justintime on October 07, 2012, 12:38:07 AM
Another term I hear a lot in shows today is goose fronted. I'm sure there are several other definitions for this term, but to me it usually means " mother... the spare bedroom is going to be tied up for awhile as this beast will die if she has to go out and live with the rest of the herd. Or it can also mean... this female will work well for you providing you get lots of rain, and you don't expect her to raise a calf each and every year.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: justintime on October 07, 2012, 08:57:35 AM
Another term found in sale catalog footnotes is "she is a very good mother", which can mean.... she will  try to kill you or any of your pets if you get too close to her calf for several weeks after calving"
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: leanbeef on October 08, 2012, 07:26:53 AM
Lol Justin, ur gonna make it hard on some of these guys who try to put a positive spin on a clear downside in order to move sale barn cattle thru a registered sale...
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Zack on October 21, 2012, 10:14:34 AM
light-muscled (self exclamatory)

over conditioned

narrow

shallow
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: HiddenCreekCattle on November 06, 2012, 09:45:31 PM
F1 does not just refer to purebreds it is a term used for purebreds or crossbreds it just refers to the first generation of that mating. 
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: leanbeef on November 07, 2012, 05:46:02 PM
F1 does not just refer to purebreds it is a term used for purebreds or crossbreds it just refers to the first generation of that mating. 

F1 refers to the first generation crossbred animal out of two purebred parents of different breeds.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Need Help!
Post by: fed_champions on November 10, 2012, 03:41:08 PM
In addition to Knabe's list, some other terms I frequently hear are: Breaks behind the shoulders and tight through the heart girth. I'm trying to think of others!   ???


ADDED: I have also heard fat cattle being called toady.  (lol)

Actually, cattle being called toady, are not being called that because they are fat. they are calling them toady, because they are small framed, and fatten early, at a lower weight then desired.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: TCF on November 12, 2012, 06:56:56 PM
has anyone put together a full list of all the notes on this thread? if you have please upload it, i would like to read it through and save it on my computer. this will be a great tool for youth members.

Kurtis
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: knabe on December 05, 2012, 10:13:59 PM
has anyone put together a full list of all the notes on this thread? if you have please upload it, i would like to read it through and save it on my computer. this will be a great tool for youth members.

Kurtis

why don't you have a youth member do it.  it's only 5 pages.  bet they could do it in an hour.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: ckl003 on January 18, 2013, 02:40:35 PM
Rat tailed?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: leanbeef on January 18, 2013, 07:33:25 PM
Rat tailed?

Rat-tailed would be a descriptor, kinda like describing color or markings. It's a genetic condition that occurs in heterozygous black cattle with the dilution gene originating from at least one Simmental parent. There are other breeds that offer the dilution gene for sure--Charolais, for example--but i'm not aware of other breeds that carry the gene that causes rat-tail. The cattle are a smoky color, and usually have short, curly hair covering the body and very short hair on the tail with little to no switch.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: playsomethingcountry00 on January 22, 2013, 08:09:40 PM
I've been told its important to have a "sound" steer. I kind of understand what it means but how is it defined?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: blackdiamond on January 30, 2013, 04:20:07 PM
I've been told its important to have a "sound" steer. I kind of understand what it means but how is it defined?

sound is about as accurate of a description as me saying your animal is pretty...

it can mean 100 different things.

structurally sound, sound moving, sound skeleton, sound muscled, sound traveleing..

Usually indicates good structured.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: -XBAR- on March 26, 2013, 06:56:23 PM
I've been told its important to have a "sound" steer. I kind of understand what it means but how is it defined?

sound is about as accurate of a description as me saying your animal is pretty...

it can mean 100 different things.

structurally sound, sound moving, sound skeleton, sound muscled, sound traveleing..

Usually indicates good structured.

Those a Soundness is a complete description of structure.  Its not subjective nor can you have ' partial' soundness. Its an all or none deal.   Im not familiar with muscle  in terms of soundness.  Think bones and ligaments.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: mchalmar on March 26, 2013, 09:02:17 PM
I don't know if this word has been addressed or not, but my breeder said my heifer was "a real cool heifer" when I went to pick her out, but I'm just not sure what that term means.  ??? Help, please? ;D
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: jfarms on March 31, 2013, 08:17:27 PM
"a real cool heifer" means she has the style, but needs a good 6 inches of hair put on her via cooler and wash rack.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: TCF on April 07, 2013, 10:11:49 PM
calling a heifer 'real cool' is extremely subjective. This applies to lots of different people in many ways. I call a real cool heifer one that has the look and build to really catch your eye. nice neck, smooth shouldered and big bodied. I think heifers that are well balanced, stylish and soft made can fit in to most people definition of cool. this term is more slang than anything and a great descriptor to lead into how you could break one down. we all think different things are cool, and the same goes with calling one that.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Rachel Cutrer on April 24, 2013, 04:36:30 PM
This is what we use here at RHD for official spelling, grammar and punctuation on a lot of standard terms. It's not necessarily your clubby terms but it is our official style guide:

http://ranchhousedesigns.com/education/livestock-style-book (http://ranchhousedesigns.com/education/livestock-style-book)

Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: RSJ on May 12, 2013, 06:07:28 PM
How about "Hot Ration", and "CIDR". I know what CIDR's are used for just not too sure on all the specs
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: leanbeef on May 12, 2013, 07:25:41 PM
How about "Hot Ration", and "CIDR". I know what CIDR's are used for just not too sure on all the specs

A "hot" ration is a feedstuff that has a high level of energy...that would be describing a complete ration that you would expect cattle to perform well on, but it could also describe a ration that might present some problems in terms of digestive issues, feet development, cattle being excessively fat, etc.

CIDR is a trademarked commercial product name that refers to an vaginal progesterone-releasing insert. Both of these terms are industry terms, but neither would be in reference to describing cattle which is kinda what this topic is more about.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: LB Cattle on October 14, 2013, 05:33:10 PM
Banana legged?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Bmomma on January 24, 2014, 07:08:47 PM
If you can get into some livestock judging( Ag teacher/ Agr. Ext. County agent can direct you)
  that will help on you terminology.
 Break in the chine. Right behind the shoulder blades - Chine. This is a fault on all species of show animals. It is a weakness in the muscles behind these blades.
 Twist - from the butthole to the bottom where the hind legs connect. The longer that muscle is the better. I.E depth of twist

Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: CattleWiz on February 03, 2014, 07:26:28 PM
Has anyone heard the term "coon fronted" used by a judge? Would this be bad? good?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: -XBAR- on February 07, 2014, 08:44:35 AM
Has anyone heard the term "coon fronted" used by a judge? Would this be bad? good?

I've heard 'cool fronted' and 'coon footed' but never 'coon fronted.'  Cool fronted likely refers to their ewe or horse-like front end.  Coon footed cattle tend to bottom out in their rear pasterns to the point that their dewclaws touch the ground when they step.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: CattleWiz on February 07, 2014, 12:21:59 PM
Thanks XBar.. I must have miss heard the judge. Coon footed makes a lot more sense.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Sir Loin on February 22, 2014, 03:50:24 PM
A word I haven't see is:
Heiferette
Quote
A heiferette is a female bovine that is typically more than six months of age but is less than two years of age. This bovine normally has had no more than one calf. It may also refer to heifers that are placed under care after the loss of a calf.

It has also morphed to mean:
 A heifer that has been spayed.
This procedure is some times used by breeders to protect a blood line.

SL




Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: -XBAR- on February 22, 2014, 04:40:59 PM
Heiferette around here is a breeding age heifer who's open.  It's a pejorative.   Any female bovine that has calved is a cow. No exceptions.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Sir Loin on February 22, 2014, 05:41:35 PM
Around here ( TN ) a heifer is a female calf and a young cow.
which includes a first time heifer and some time even a second time heifer.
Here you can buy a bred heifer with a calf by her side and still be buying a heifer.
They are know as 3 in 1s. in the action ring.

Heiferette is as I stated.

How about brood cow , does anyone use that any more?
How about proven as in a proven heifer: a heifer who has produced a healthy calf and has bred back successfully.
Liz
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Sir Loin on February 27, 2014, 11:17:40 AM
DOODLER

Little doggie type 200-300# calf that's odd colored or dairy influenced or horned
Okie 2-3 type light calf
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: tamarack on February 28, 2014, 11:43:20 PM
Here in Alberta a heiferette  is a heifer that preg tested open or never got bred 1.5 to 2yrs of age
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: librarian on September 07, 2014, 05:03:53 PM
rising chine?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: BLRanch on November 04, 2014, 08:19:43 PM
rising chine?


I always thought this term was more associated with hogs. When a hog starts to get stale they will start to rise a bit in there back behind their shoulders.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Danielle1018 on April 22, 2015, 08:41:56 PM
I think that this is more associated in hogs, but I have heard it mentioned in cattle before.
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: ajschieffer on March 20, 2016, 07:57:41 PM
What about the term bloom?
Title: Re: Meanings of terms - Neeed Help! Updated List
Post by: Sparks Livestock on February 09, 2017, 02:54:12 PM
A 2017 edit to an older post.some of the items were changed, some were not, some were added due to having seen them used at shows in the end of 2016 and the beginning of 2017.

Breaks in the Chine: Not a good term, chine refers to the point at the top of the shoulder where both shoulder blades or scapula's meet. terms for chine revolve around being high chinned, stale chines, open shouldered. broken topped, weak topped, sway backed refer to how cattle are not strong topped or don't blend well due to the scapula placement

Broken over in the knee: Forward at their knee, usually coexists with being straight fronted =The polite way of saying that they wont survive in a good breeding program more than a couple of years or that they would be culled quickly

Body Condition Score:  A score on a scale of 1 to 9, reflecting the amount of fat reserves in a cow's body, where 1 = very thin and 9 = extremely fat.

Calving Ease Score: A numerical score quantifying calving ease, ranging from 1 for an easy, unassisted calving through 5 for an abnormal presentation.

Capacious: refers to body type, depth and power Eg. "I started out with a extremely capacious Heifer that will show more of an economical advantage as she moves into her production stage..."

Carries through to Twist: Adequate amount of muscle down the back and inside of, lower quarter can refer to this also

Cute Headed: Bad term.  Can be used in replacement of  a negative term on steers or heifers, usually means that the animal is smaller framed or is not as far in their growth pattern as others in the class.

Embryo Transfer:  Removing fertilized ova (embryos) from one cow (the donor), generally in response to hormone-induced super ovulation, and placing these embryos into other cows (the recipients). More calves can be obtained from cows of superior breeding value by this technique

F1:  Offspring resulting from the mating of a purebred (straight-bred) bull to purebred (straight-bred) females of another breed.

Flat Ribbed: Shows a lack of maternal characteristics in cows as big ribbed cattle are more economical to feed and can carry a larger calf without sacrificing nutritional ability

Flat Boned: replacement of "fine boned", "smaller framed", "harder doing"

Freemartin:  Female born twin to a bull calf (approximately 9 out of 10 will be infertile).

Green: Generally means "not ready". It often refers to body condition...if a calf is lean or lacking condition, we'd say the calf is "green".

Goose Necked/Fronted: Rocket fronted, choke neck, clean necked and throat latch, without excessive leather or skin, clean fronted, stylish

Heavy Footed: not sound, but could be if the animal wasn't so fat or heavy bred. Eg. " The Heifer I used to conclude the class is one that could arguably be placed among the top end as shes cool fronted, maternally made throughout and doesn't sacrifice femininity for sheer power, but the main fault I find in her today is that she's just extremely Heavy footed and over conditioned and just doesn't bring the flexibility for a production setting that the heifers ahead of her brought"

High Pinned: Pin bones are set higher than the hook bones, giving the hip an upward appearance as opposed to being level from hooks to pins (desirable) or dropping in her pins. From a production standpoint, a sloped hip does make more sense because the calf comes out in a downward direction. Cattle that slope badly from hooks to pins tend to have more slope to other angles including shoulders and pasterns and might also tend to have more set to the hock. Everything is connected!

Hind Leg: They carry lower between their legs.

Maintenance Energy Requirement:  The amount of feed energy required per day by an animal to maintain its body weight and support necessary metabolic functions.

Maternal EPD:  An EPD representing the effect of the genes of an individuals daughters on the trait of interest. A calving ease maternal EPD, for example, represents the ease with which an individual daughters calve are born. See also Direct EPD.

Outbreeding (Outcrossing): Mating together of animals that are not closely related. Mild outbreeding is illustrated by mating cows to a sire of their own breed but who is not closely related to them. Such outcrossing may widen the genetic base in a herd and reduce inbreeding accumulation. A higher level of outcrossing is illustrated by crossing two BIOS taurus breeds. This generally would result in beneficial heterosis for economically important traits.
Ovulation:  Release of the female germ cell (egg or ovum) by the ovary. Cows usually ovulate several hours (up to 15 hours) after the end of estrus or standing heat.

Palatability:  Acceptable to the taste or sufficiently agreeable in flavor to be eaten.

Parturition: The act of giving birth; calving.

Pedigree:  A tabulation of names of an individual's ancestors, usually only those of the three to five closest generations. Pedigree information is used to establish genetic relationships among individuals to use in genetic evaluations.

Pone Fat: The fat deposited on either side of the tail. Tail pones are useful in predicting quality grade in all cattle, especially dairy and exotic breeds. Animals showing no fat deposits on either side of the tail head should be considered for the standard quality grade. Select quality grade will show only small amounts of pone fat (about the size of a tennis ball) and choice grade cattle will show moderate amounts of pone fat (about the size of a soft ball).

Phenotype:  The visible or measurable expression of a character; weaning weight, post wean gain, or reproduction for example. For most traits, phenotype is influenced by both genotype and environment. The relative degree to which phenotype variation among individuals is caused by transmissible genetic effects is the heritability of a trait

Polled: Naturally hornless cattle. Having no horns or scurs.

Postpartum Interval:  The number of days between parturition (Birth) and the first postpartum estrus (First Heat after Birth).

Post legged: Little or no set to the hock. The back legs appear very straight, and the animal tends to swing the hind leg from the hip instead of flexing the hock to move forward.

Progeny: The young, or offspring, of the parents.

Pounds Heavy:  They weigh more... simple scale to eye term also the same as "pounds per day of age advantage" in a heifer class

Roomy Middled: poor term. spring of rib, bold ribbed, volume, capacity, shape

Soggy: big bellied, deep bodied, proper to heavier conditioned, soft, easy feeding looking big ribbed, massive ribbed, powerful, deep. a really good term as far as bulls and steers go, as far as heifers I would say "she shows to be more maternal in her appearance though her rib and depth"

Stout animal: 2 ways to use this one as a positive, 1) I marked 1 over 2 as he is the stouter made steer throughout, showing more base, depth of body, and overall muscle expression
2) Even though he did not have the style or the adg (Average Daily Gain advantage, I still appreciated him for being the stoutest animal in the class, so I marked him second

Scrotal circumference: A measure of testes size obtained by measuring the distance around the testicles in the scrotum with a circular tape. Related to semen producing capacity and age at puberty of female sibs and progeny.

Scurs:  Horny tissue or rudimentary horns that are attached to the skin rather than the bony parts of the head

Super Ovulation: Process by which a cow is treated with reproductive hormones to induce her to produce more eggs than normal. (Used in Flushing Cows)

True Skeletal Width: how an animal is built from the ground up. true skeletal width is from their base width  up to their chest width, through their spring of rib and to the width over their top.

Wasty Middled: An indication of unfitness, loosely skinned, fatty look, usually used in an animal that was held for to long and lost all freshness

Weak Loined: Weak in the top over the loin area(middle of back). This animal appears to have a sway in their back, as opposed to a strong or straight top, which is straight from the top of the shoulder to the curve of the tail head. These animals are usually loose structured and still sounder made than cattle that "bow their top" which tend to be straighter off both ends and have less flex to the hock, knee and pastern.

Truest in their ties: An animal that has not put on an excessive amount of fat through their back.

Banana legged: HAHA  someone actually used this as a term in a class? I would assume they were trying to nicely say that the calf was sickle hocked BAD

Hot ration: a HIGH energy feed that will burn the rumen if not managed properly, used for fast growth, or high sperm production usually.
Bloom: usually used to say that they have a acceptable amount of fat cover that gives a smooth appearance, can be mistaken with high dollar hair (cooler, tons of products and a GREAT fitter)

rising chine: usually means that that should be their last show because they're "breaking behind the shoulder"



Note: all of the examples used were by judges at national shows, Ft. worth, Denver, Louisville, Tulsa State fair, and reasons that I used judging jackpots.