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Offline beebe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #120 on: December 26, 2019, 10:21:26 PM »
Do all variants of the myostatin gene contribute to lean tender beef? Or are there other expressions?

Offline knabe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #121 on: December 27, 2019, 10:15:16 AM »
Supposedly only the variant in Piedmontese has an intermediate measurable effect in a homozygous state. It has a stop codon very late in the allele while all the others are much earlier  and have no intermediate effect in a heterozygous state.

I havent seen a comparison between homozygous variants though it probably exists and I missed it.
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Offline Boreal

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #122 on: December 27, 2019, 01:40:11 PM »
Theres definitely research demonstrating a positive effect on tenderness in Piedmontese heterozygotes. Theres positive tenderness data on the F94L mutation as well. Im fairly certain Ive previously seen data on other mutations, too. That said, theres a demonstrably negative effect on flavour and juiciness - particularly in homozygotes. As well, theres interplay between myostatin and u-caplain - that changes things a bit. But research on that is new and limited.

The gist of most of the research is that a myostatin heterzygote will likely improve overall carcass quality without sacrificing much on the reproductive end of things.


Offline beebe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #124 on: December 27, 2019, 08:27:16 PM »
I know where there is a bull that has one copy of F94L and one copy the of  E226 variant.  He is a nice thick bull with a really strong loin.  It seems like a guy like me who sells meat might get some good out of a bull like that used as a terminal cross on commercial cows. Any thoughts?

Offline Dale

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #125 on: December 28, 2019, 08:51:23 AM »
From the applied genetics point of view, the F94L might be useful.  What if any of your cows are carriers of E226?  If a resulting calf were to be homozygous E226, would that not be risky?  Judging from the Canadian testing of Shorthorns, E226 bull carriers now are at near 70 head. 

Some people ignore the myostatin issue, but we had a very large calf born a year ago, and that was reason enough to be sure that our herd bull is myostatin free, in case E226 is elsewhere in our cow herd.  Sometimes lightning strikes twice.  The giant calf at birth was from some POPULAR bloodlines, so I suspect double muscling is a potential problem down the road.  Like the TH defective calf that we had born back in 2005, the ginormous 2018 calf was something I do not want to happen again to our customers or here.

In 2019 every birth here at the Homeplace was unassisted, including a few first calf heifers.  Cowboys like for their cows to give birth on their own.  Trouble free works for me.

In a university herd I saw a double muscled Angus calf decades ago, born without assistance.  Homozygous carriers are not desirable.

Offline Dale

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #126 on: December 28, 2019, 09:01:47 AM »
4282869 is the 2018 calf that inspired us to test our herd bull for myostatin.  At least 5 prominent Shorthorn bulls are in his pedigree as well as other widely-used bloodlines from the past.  Since a huge calf had not been born here in decades, one has to wonder if myostatin was coming into play?   

Offline beebe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #127 on: December 28, 2019, 09:47:27 AM »
I know the source of the E226 variant, I do not have any of those genetics in my commercial herd.  That is why I think that if all offspring were marketed as beef it should not cause any problems in the future. Thanks for your comments, I want to be very careful about what I do.  I agree on the unassisted births.  I assisted one heifer last year.  One assist out of 160 births.

Offline idalee

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #128 on: December 28, 2019, 10:11:02 AM »
It may be of interest to some of the readers that I recently tested some ET animals in my herd for Myostatin.    One ET daughter of CYT Sparkle Girl 0166  ET sired by Kamilaroi Meat Packer is positive for the E226X mutation.   Since Meat Packer is tested homozygous free in Canada,  this means that CYT Sparkle Girl is a carrier.    Then two of four  ET daughters of HC Sparkle Delight 77W were tested as carriers of the E226X mutation.   They are sired by Four Point Major who was never tested.  However, he has no genetics in his pedigree that are known or suggested as carriers.   Therefore,  this is suggestive, but not confirmative,  that Sparkle Delight 77W may be a carrier as well.
I have determined that I will have a Myostatin free herd so additional testing is in progress.     
« Last Edit: December 28, 2019, 10:13:38 AM by idalee »

Offline mbigelow

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #129 on: December 28, 2019, 10:13:41 AM »
Dale- i did not see test results on the calf you had concerns about. So, did you just speculate that myo might be the culprit.   I have quite a few cows with very similar breeding to the bottom side of that pedigree.  I really dislike having to pay more and test for more things but, as they say, an ounce of prevention is much better than a pound to cure. On a positive note i really do like what i see from both your HC son and the one i have. Keep me posted on how you mate the daughters.

Offline mark tenenbaum

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #130 on: December 28, 2019, 10:35:43 AM »
I only had 2 Sr Red Rider drive calves-They were not big at birth due to the cow side but both had the double muscled look-I think the most pronounced Myostain "looking" bull I remember would be K Kim Hiest Elite Rider-real freaky looking O0

Offline Medium Rare

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #131 on: December 28, 2019, 12:10:38 PM »
So far, 20 females and 28 bulls have results posted in the US database.
Compared to 283 females and 452 bulls posted in the Canadian database.
It looks like several of the US results were actually entered by Canadian breeders.

It's crazy how one little line on a map can have so much influence on something. Considering the consistant flow of genetics south and what some breeders have revealed about the genetics that flowed north, it'll be interesting to see the reaction when more people start testing animals in the US.

The marbling epd, even if accepted as being relatively unproven, seems to have a story to tell in many cases.

Offline Hopster1000

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #132 on: December 28, 2019, 01:01:12 PM »
It may be of interest to some of the readers that I recently tested some ET animals in my herd for Myostatin.    One ET daughter of CYT Sparkle Girl 0166  ET sired by Kamilaroi Meat Packer is positive for the E226X mutation.   Since Meat Packer is tested homozygous free in Canada,  this means that CYT Sparkle Girl is a carrier.    Then two of four  ET daughters of HC Sparkle Delight 77W were tested as carriers of the E226X mutation.   They are sired by Four Point Major who was never tested.  However, he has no genetics in his pedigree that are known or suggested as carriers.   Therefore,  this is suggestive, but not confirmative,  that Sparkle Delight 77W may be a carrier as well.
I have determined that I will have a Myostatin free herd so additional testing is in progress.   

I also have an ET bull by Sparkle Girl and Meat Packet that carriers one E226X gene. I am assuming it comes from Diamond Captain Mark. He is just 16 months and I have tried him on a small number of cows I think are myostatin free.
I also have a cow with 2 copies. She has calved unassisted and milks well. She is from the Elsie's Jade line so assume she also got one copy of the E226X from Diamond Captain Mark.
I have had a little bit of experience with the E226X gene and it is not consistent across lines. Some lines are bigger calves and some lines have smaller calves.

Offline knabe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #133 on: December 28, 2019, 01:16:41 PM »
It's crazy how one little line on a map can have so much influence on something.


bull of the month club.  draft pick, PHA, Cunia, spastic pareisis and monkey mouth. double stuff is actually quadruple stuff i think.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2019, 01:17:56 PM by knabe »
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Offline Dale

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #134 on: December 28, 2019, 04:14:46 PM »
I apologize for not taking a sample from the calf, which we lost--my theory of myo is speculation, but surely something was out of the ordinary?  Canadians reported calving problems in homozygous calves, so I wondered if ours was a myo?

This calf was far outside our normal weight range.  We have not had one even close to this heavy in the last 2 decades.  Even during the 90's excessive birthweights we had nothing as large.  This calf's sire, Homeplace Cool, had no assists even from heifers in another herd (unrecorded data) where he was used.  Over the past 40 years, counting commercial cows, we have calved out a few thousand.  Our registered cattle have their birthweights turned in for 30 years, and progress has been made in moderating birthweights since 1999. 

 

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