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Offline knabe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #150 on: January 31, 2020, 04:24:13 PM »
Here is the ad our beloved steerplanet is showing me because I have been searching diabetes, obesity and metabolism.  The Myostatin mutation is addressing the same issue in cattle, I think.

Myostatin is involved in the pop-up ads?

And if one has the right defect, they go away?
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Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #151 on: January 31, 2020, 04:59:41 PM »
Almost. You must be thinking of Buyostatin....one of the cyber-proteins.  If you inhibit Buyostatin, pop up ads become more numerous...sometimes to the point of squeezing out all other text.
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Online Dale

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #152 on: February 03, 2020, 09:24:34 AM »
4296157
CSB BAXTER LEARJET G23
Homozygous Carrier (of F94L)

His photo is on digitalbeef.

Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #153 on: February 03, 2020, 09:30:58 AM »
I have been reading a lot about Myostatin. When Myostatin is inhibited from regulating muscle growth, not only the number of muscle fibers continue to increase, but the type of muscle fibers that increase are the type II fast twitch fibers. Normally the muscle fibers in cattle are predominantly type I slow twitch fibers. Fast twitch and slow twitch muscles have different metabolic pathways for burning energy. Fast twitch fibers draw quick bursts of energy ( speed and strength) from circulating blood sugar and slow twitch muscles burn stored fat. Fastvtwitch muscles are bigger and stronger, but they fatigue quickly after blood sugar is exhausted. The animals pre slaughter and the meat, post slaughter, must be handled with care to prevent the muscle from becoming dark and tough. Before death the muscle may be more tender...but that can change with stress and temperature.

Fast twitch muscle is less insulin resistant than slow twitch because instead of sugar in the blood being stored as fat, it is burned for energy. Myostatin inhibition is being studied as a treatment for diabetes for this reason.
So, when I propose that Myostatin inhibition by the various mutation in cattle is an upstream response to recalibrate the metabolism to better survive downstream stress...at least there is logic to the idea. What is the fattening process other than lack of exercise and a high calorie diet? Cattle are evolved to walk, graze, rest and flee from predators occasionally. Most of the time they just walk and graze. Change the conditions of existence and nature might respond with variations in the dosage of the proteins that gene regulatory networks produce. Some are better, some worse. Heterozygosity is generally advantageous. So, I think the question is not whether a mutation is good or bad...profitable or not, but are these mutations advantageous under the conditions your cattle are living in? Beyond that, are the animals being handled in such a way that their muscles are not exhausted at the point of death and is the meat being handled appropriately to maintain tenderness?
http://www.esalq.usp.br/lepse/imgs/conteudo_thumb/Recasting-developmental-evolution-in-terms-of-genetic-pathway-and-network-evolution-------and-the-implications-for-comparative-biology-1.pdf
"Thus, while the concepts of pathway and network evo- lution outlined in this paper are neither particularly abstract nor difficult, they constitute a challenge to traditional think- ing and experimental analyses in both evolutionary and com- parative biology. Accordingly, their incorporation into the standard thinking of these fields might well proceed slowly."

A very straightforward review of the pros and cons of Myostatin mutations in beef production
http://www.beefmastersa.co.za/images/photos/46-78-Beefmaster_Journal_2019.pdf

« Last Edit: February 03, 2020, 09:35:42 AM by librarian »
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Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #154 on: February 03, 2020, 09:49:45 AM »
Haplotype diversity of the myostatin gene among beef cattle breeds
Susana Dunner, M. Eugenia Miranda, Yves Amigues, Javier Can ̃ ́on, Michel Georges, Roger Hanset, John Williams, Fran ̧cois M ́enissier
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281501888_Haplotype_diversity_of_the_myostatin_gene_among_beef_breeds/fulltext/55f8d82c08ae07629de131d0/281501888_Haplotype_diversity_of_the_myostatin_gene_among_beef_breeds.pdf?origin=publication_detail
"One hypothesis is the extensive dissemination of individuals of the Shorthorn breed used in the late 19th century to improve most western European bovine breeds which would explain the presence of the trait [10, 25], and the other being the Friesian breed [9, 20, 31] or more generally milk purpose black pied bovine populations from the Baltic plain (Hanset, pers. comm.), being responsible for spreading the mutation all over western Europe [25]."
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Online Dale

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #155 on: June 28, 2020, 02:06:10 PM »

Offline knabe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #156 on: June 28, 2020, 02:49:42 PM »
A market for less beef but of better eating quality and with environmental credentials and provenance will potentially lend itself more to forage based systems and inputs perceived as more natural. The Beef Shorthorn is well placed to position itself as a breed that does all of this and more. However, a careful eye on sensibly exploiting the Myostatin deletions for the current market while conserving the breeds other attributes may serve dividends in keeping the Beef Shorthorn relevant to future markets."

article is misleading.

any breed has the same capability of shorthorns with regard to the myostatin gene. really, the only breed that is well placed is piedmontese. they seem to have two types of homozygous lines.  one's that appear normal, and ones that appear heavier muscled.

normally, the breed is homozygus.  However, recently a bull was found to be heterozygous and a notice went out within the breed.

almost every breed has the same literature. there is simply more diversity within than between breeds.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 02:52:34 PM by knabe »
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Offline aj

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #157 on: June 29, 2020, 02:54:10 PM »
So on Learjet......could he be a carrier on both sides?
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Online Medium Rare

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #158 on: June 29, 2020, 03:44:23 PM »
So on Learjet......could he be a carrier on both sides?

If he is out of who his pedigree says he is, they are both carriers. There's also the possibility that they are more than carriers.

Offline aj

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #159 on: July 01, 2020, 01:39:30 PM »
Thanks. If they are more than carriers.....they could be double muscled?
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Online Medium Rare

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #160 on: July 01, 2020, 04:17:53 PM »
Thanks. If they are more than carriers.....they could be double muscled?

I guess it depends on how you define "double muscled". I've yet to see a shorthorn present as double muscled in the way we tend to think of the Belgian Blue cattle being double muscled. They've taken the presentation to the extreme. You can see some Shorthorn x Limousin calves that look pretty close to it though with huge shoulders, a tight middle, and well defined muscles.

Online shortybreeder

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #161 on: July 01, 2020, 08:58:26 PM »
Thanks. If they are more than carriers.....they could be double muscled?

I guess it depends on how you define "double muscled". I've yet to see a shorthorn present as double muscled in the way we tend to think of the Belgian Blue cattle being double muscled. They've taken the presentation to the extreme. You can see some Shorthorn x Limousin calves that look pretty close to it though with huge shoulders, a tight middle, and well defined muscles.
I've come across a couple in my travels. The breeders made me swear to secrecy where they were and how they were bred because they didn't want the world to know they had that problem. I can assure you they are out there, but nobody wants their name tied to that so they don't let pictures get out showing it. I've even seen a double muscled calf with no tail.. that was one ugly looking bull calf.

Offline knabe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #162 on: July 05, 2020, 01:57:21 PM »
double stuff.
double trouble
battle of the bulge
junk in the trunk
double vision
wiggle wham
steroids free
hittin it out of the park
755, the real bull
yoda


etc.

« Last Edit: July 05, 2020, 02:05:35 PM by knabe »
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Online beebe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #163 on: July 21, 2020, 07:18:19 AM »
Do bulls that carry the Myostatin gene tend to have smaller testicles?

Offline aj

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #164 on: July 21, 2020, 08:06:34 AM »
I don't understand knabe's post and his list of bulls. Double Stuff isn't positive for myostatin is he?
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

 

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