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Offline librarian

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questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« on: March 05, 2014, 06:02:11 PM »
I was looking back at Remitall Choice Mint progeny and see that Happy Acres (HA prefix) was using him quite a bit as well as some related bulls, back when.  Does anyone remember these bulls or the McIver Shorthorn program? Other Great Event sons?
REMITALL WHITE CAP a Kelburn Great Event son
KELBURN GOLDEN BOY a Bapton Copywright son
REMITALL SUPER EVENT  a Kelburn Great Event son
Also I see Happy Acres is still in business, but not with Shorthorns.  They still use Remitall bred Herefords though.  I would always like to hear more about the Remitall herds  How big were the Shorthorns of that time? 
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Offline redcows

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Re: questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2014, 08:24:35 PM »
Librarian, Can't help you with what they looked liked in person, but expect Justintime and others probably can. My cousins gifted me my Uncle Milton Vaupel's marked catalog from the 1968 Remitall Anniversary Sale where Kelburn Great Event was the featured reference sire and Super Event was lot one and the note says he sold for $8,600 to Mc Iver Bros., Farwell, Minn. That catalog is one of my prized possessions.

Offline justintime

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Re: questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2014, 11:24:18 PM »
I was looking back at Remitall Choice Mint progeny and see that Happy Acres (HA prefix) was using him quite a bit as well as some related bulls, back when.  Does anyone remember these bulls or the McIver Shorthorn program? Other Great Event sons?
REMITALL WHITE CAP a Kelburn Great Event son
KELBURN GOLDEN BOY a Bapton Copywright son
REMITALL SUPER EVENT  a Kelburn Great Event son
Also I see Happy Acres is still in business, but not with Shorthorns.  They still use Remitall bred Herefords though.  I would always like to hear more about the Remitall herds  How big were the Shorthorns of that time?

I worked at Remitall for their 1968 sale where Remitall Choice Mint sold for $8600 for McIver Bros from Minnesota. Choice Mint was the largest bull that Remitall ever produced from the Great Event line. Choice Mint was sired by Remitall Hercules who was a Great Event son. Hercules was much smaller at maturity than Choice Mint was. There were some bigger framed cows in his pedigree particularly some of the A-7 cows. The A-7 ranch has a pile of history in Alberta as well. There were three large ranches established by 3 Cross brothers. A-7, Rothney, and Bar Pipe. A-7 and Rothney had Shorthorn herds and Bar Pipe established one of the great Horned Hereford programs in Western Canada.  Kelburn Great Event would be considered a very small framed bull by todays standards, but Choice Mint was over 2300 lbs when he sold. I remember him being very thick, deep fleshed and pretty sound. He was a 4 year old when he sold. Kelburn Great Event was very eye appealing, however most of his sons and daughters were smaller framed. I don't remember too many Great Event sired cattle that really bred as well as most people thought the would.
I remember all three of the bulls you have mentioned here. Super Event was much like his sire. Pretty but very very small. White Cap was not quite as small as Super Event but he was also plainer made as well. Kelburn Golden Boy was decent but lacked muscle. I do not remember any progeny of any of these bulls that were memorable at all.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2014, 08:30:12 AM by justintime »
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Offline librarian

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Re: questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2014, 10:42:06 AM »
Justintime,
Thank you for the information.  Studying cattle seems to be the door to a lot of very interesting history and the story of the Cross family in Alberta is perfect example of trails a pedigree will take you to. 
Looking at the Cross family history, I read in an archive, that " Sandy Cross was a well-known breeder of Galloway and Shorthorn cattle on Rothney Farm, south of Calgary."
Does anyone know about a Rothney herd of Galloways?
I also see a lot of Calrossie breeding back of Choice Mint.  I read a book, Scotch Shorthorn Herds of England Scotland and Wales, by Marston.  I liked the geographic approach of the herd descriptions, but it was very clear that WWII had really devastated the breeding stock of Shorthorns in Britain.  My education never really got the point across about how WWII changed agriculture in Great Britain forever, but that book certainly painted the picture.
Calrossie Control was kind of the hero of Marston, and I didn't really see why they made so much of him from the photograph of the bull. Maybe the War had a lot to do with the eventual character of the Calrossie cattle that were imported to North America, as you have mentioned in other posts. From Marston's book, it seemed that everyone who had managed to salvage their herds was making a killing exporting seedstock as fast as they could after the War.  However, it seemed that during the War, the herds had been scattered and management was inconsistent.
Did this happen in Ireland as well?
Thank you also for relating the size of Choice Mint. 

'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline oakview

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Re: questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2014, 12:39:25 PM »
I was looking for other photos in an old Shorthorn World magazine last night and came across a photo of Great Event and several of his sons.  Included were two full brothers, sired by Great Event, that came to Melbourne Farms of Illinois.  They were Remitall Captain Jim and Remitall Gold Emblem.  There is also a photo of them with their dam towards the middle of the magazine, along with numerous pictures of other noted Shorthorn cows and their "famous" sons.  It was noted that the cow in question had six or seven sons in service in various purebred herds in both Canada and the States.  Melbourne had quite a write up in their two page ad regarding Captain Jim and Gold Emblem.  What they wrote would back up what JIT said about Great Event being a small framed bull.  The ad stated that Great Event was indeed a small bull, but the dam of Jim and Emblem was a large cow from a background of large cattle.  It went on to say that all of her progeny seemed to inherit her large size.  You have to remember that at that time, the early 70's, there was a mad rush for size and growth.  Melbourne Farms wanted everyone to know they had joined the movement.  I'll post some of these photos for you tonight.

Offline justintime

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Re: questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2014, 11:27:49 PM »
Justintime,
Thank you for the information.  Studying cattle seems to be the door to a lot of very interesting history and the story of the Cross family in Alberta is perfect example of trails a pedigree will take you to. 
Looking at the Cross family history, I read in an archive, that " Sandy Cross was a well-known breeder of Galloway and Shorthorn cattle on Rothney Farm, south of Calgary."
Does anyone know about a Rothney herd of Galloways?
I also see a lot of Calrossie breeding back of Choice Mint.  I read a book, Scotch Shorthorn Herds of England Scotland and Wales, by Marston.  I liked the geographic approach of the herd descriptions, but it was very clear that WWII had really devastated the breeding stock of Shorthorns in Britain.  My education never really got the point across about how WWII changed agriculture in Great Britain forever, but that book certainly painted the picture.
Calrossie Control was kind of the hero of Marston, and I didn't really see why they made so much of him from the photograph of the bull. Maybe the War had a lot to do with the eventual character of the Calrossie cattle that were imported to North America, as you have mentioned in other posts. From Marston's book, it seemed that everyone who had managed to salvage their herds was making a killing exporting seedstock as fast as they could after the War.  However, it seemed that during the War, the herds had been scattered and management was inconsistent.
Did this happen in Ireland as well?
Thank you also for relating the size of Choice Mint.



Yes, Sandy Cross actually had 3 purebred herds at Rothney. The Shorthorn herd was the largest and most well known. He also had a purebred Galloway herd and a purebred Luing herd. He imported most of the Galloway and Luing cattle from Scotland to establish these herds.
Sandy Cross was a very interesting man. I never really got to know him very well until he was starting to get close to retirement, other than some short visits with him at some shows and sales. Sandy phoned me just before Christmas in  the late 70s and he said he wanted me to come to Calgary because he wanted to discuss something with me. When I asked him what he wanted to discuss he said I would have to come to Calgary to find out. I decided I better head out and see why he had contacted me, so I flew to Calgary on an early morning flight and booked a return flight for later the same night. Sandy picked me up at the airport and took me to the ranch. We spent the entire day driving through all the cattle and all the ranch. He told me how he did not ever want his beloved ranch to become a part of the city and be covered with pavement and homes. He told me that he wanted to sell all the cattle and he asked me if I would purchase 300 of the Shorthorn cows. He told me that he would sell me 300 cows at $300 each. I asked him what he would ask if I was to pick out a smaller group and he said if I took less than 150 head he wanted $500 per head, and if I only wanted to hand pick a few out they would be priced at $800 and up.  I told him I would go home and talk with my father about this.
I already knew what my answer would be but I came home and phoned Sandy a couple days later. I told him we just couldn't accept his offer. I saw Sandy Cross about a year later, and he asked me why I had turned down his offer. I told him that there were several reasons, those being we did not have the feed, or the money or the pasture to run this many more cows. At the time we were already running over 300 cows ourselves and feeding 800-1000 feeder cattle besides. When I told this to Sandy, he said... well why didn't you tell me this. He said that he could have kept them there for the winter and he really didn't need the money and we could have worked out some kind of deal on them. He said he could have made arrangements to leave the cattle there through the next summer as well.

 As a side note, I was in total awe when I stayed in his home on that trip. I ended up missing my plane that night as Sandy was still showing me the ranch when I should have been at the airport. I went home the next evening. The walls of his home were covered with original Charles Russell paintings, and I expect they would be valued in the millions. Sandy and I sat and talked long into the night and he told me many stories of his travels around the world ( well he told me what he could remember!) Sandy Cross also had owned Calgary Brewery for many years and was their best customer, and he was a very bad alcoholic for many years. Sandy told me that after he sobered up he found in his records  that he had gone around the world on 3 different occasions and he had no memory of a single day of these trips . Sandy Cross never married until he was about 70 years old. When he asked his wife Ann if she would marry him, she said she would agree to marry him but only if he never took another alcoholic drink. Alcohol never touched his lips from that day on. Quite a story really. Sandy took Ann on another trip around the world which took several months when they got married, and he remembered this trip.
When Sandy died, he left the Rothney ranch ( which was 49 sections  or over 31000 acres) to the Alberta government as a wildlife and conservation park for several generations into the future. I can't remember if he left the entire ranch or just a major portion of it. The ranch was a solid block of land- 7 miles by 7 miles. Today the city of Calgary is spreading around the Rothney ranch. Sandy definitely knew what would happen to his ranch if he did not ensure it could not be developed by the fast growing city of Calgary.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 08:03:36 AM by justintime »
Experience is what you get when you don't have it when you need it.

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Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity
If love is blind... why is lingerie so popular?
The only thing worse than an idiot ... is an educated idiot!

Offline librarian

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Re: questions about Kelburn Great Event sons
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2014, 12:54:44 PM »
Thank you for the great stories and I look forward to seeing the pictures.  I hope someone compiles all these reminiscences into a book.
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

 

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