Quantcast Aluminum Livestock Trailers

Sponsors



Author Topic: Aluminum Livestock Trailers  (Read 4007 times)

Offline WinterSpringsFarm

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 346
  • Karma 5
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2020, 05:18:35 AM »
Units are lbs for GVWR, not $


http://101trailer.com/wilson.html


Dont be slipping-  he meant pounds.   26k is the GVWR threshold. Ie 13 tons


Correct.

Knabe, 10k GVW is pretty silly.  I guess all the camper pullers have to abide by the same rules?

Offline knabe

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 13192
  • Karma 0
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2020, 07:12:24 AM »
"The generation that told us to question authority, has now become the Authority we cannot question!"

Offline knabe

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 13192
  • Karma 0
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2020, 07:31:57 AM »
https://calcattlemen.org/2019/07/30/cca-keeping-watch-on-for-hire-transportation-regulations/

After reading links and other links, Im still confused if I can tow a trailer that can carry 15,000 lbs behind my truck that weighs 7500+ pounds.

It sounds like I can haul only 10,000 (includes trailer weight) behind my truck with just a regular license.

"The generation that told us to question authority, has now become the Authority we cannot question!"

Offline WinterSpringsFarm

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 346
  • Karma 5
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #18 on: February 29, 2020, 01:26:33 PM »
https://calcattlemen.org/2019/07/30/cca-keeping-watch-on-for-hire-transportation-regulations/

After reading links and other links, Im still confused if I can tow a trailer that can carry 15,000 lbs behind my truck that weighs 7500+ pounds.

It sounds like I can haul only 10,000 (includes trailer weight) behind my truck with just a regular license.

quickly read that link.  Your second statement is true.  Any trailer over 10K GVWR and you would need a restricted A, which would allow you to travel 150 air miles. In MD any Combination GVWR of 26,001 would require an A license.

DOT laws are tricky and are interpreted differently by each and every DOT cop.

Offline knabe

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 13192
  • Karma 0
    • View Profile
"The generation that told us to question authority, has now become the Authority we cannot question!"

Offline knabe

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 13192
  • Karma 0
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #20 on: February 29, 2020, 10:35:31 PM »
looks like non-commercial class A license is the way to go. (on the other hand, the restriction is 150 miles within farm)

you only have to drive the vehicle type you are going to drive, not other bigger rigs, i.e. tractor trailers like commercial class A


seems like the commercial truckers have lobbied so one can't buy cattle more than 150 miles from the ranch and transport them yourself.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2020, 10:40:38 PM by knabe »
"The generation that told us to question authority, has now become the Authority we cannot question!"

Offline Doc

  • State Champion Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 3633
  • Karma 155
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2020, 06:14:54 AM »
I guess I've been very lucky over the years. I have a 24' Eby and have pulled it from MI to Texas to SC to IN, IL, OH and so forth and have never been stopped. The one state I won't pull to is IA. I've heard too many horror stories on DOT stops there for not having a DOT number posted on your truck.
 The only time I've ever been stopped was when I was crossing from Louisiana into Texas with some Quarter Horses we were taking to a sale.
A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong
enough to take everything you have.   -- Thomas Jefferson

Offline knabe

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 13192
  • Karma 0
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2020, 11:33:11 AM »
elite and wilson.

if i were to get a featherlite, i would upgrade the axles from 3500 to 4500#.  they seem to really be the lighter ones, although their carrying capacity might suffer compared to wilson/elite.

it seems an underserved market is finding the sweet spot of staying at 9950 GVWR and the lightness of the trailer.

it's not clear who will downgrade their trailers from say 14,000 to 9950. those trailers would weigh about 3500-3700 (wilson/elite), the dealers say they will do it (the dealer, not necessarily the trailer company).

i would say if carrying weight is most important while still staying under 9950#, pay attention to axle rating, cross-member spacing and thickness, doors, aluminum sheeting thickness, and flooring quality (for corrosion as well).

for over 9950#, the constraints are much less, but then you need a class C license, yearly renewal, drug tests, maybe a log, etc.

some states, i think Iowa, are notorious for stopping trailers, especially with out of state tags.

seems with the law should be changed to allow 14,000# trailers as a cap as the newer trucks can easily handle this rating and the trailers can as well compared to when the law was written.

the law, seems written to force a larger proportion of the population to class C license for a typical animal transport, say to a show, a purchase out of state, etc. for smaller producers.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2020, 11:33:27 AM by knabe »
"The generation that told us to question authority, has now become the Authority we cannot question!"

Offline vc

  • County Champion Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1766
  • Karma 56
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2020, 12:53:25 PM »
Most of the time you will not pulled over pulling a livestock trailer if it is only 2 axle, add the third axle and they will pull you over for a class A almost every time. Had a friend hauling 2 calves (2000 lbs, plus tack) back from Denver to California, he was pulling a 3 Axle trailer 30ft trailer. He was pulled over and given a warning by the first trooper, he was told to pull off the highway at the next exit and find someone with a class A, he made it 2 exits farther and was shut down. Had to have a friend fly up from Texas to get the calves home. it was his 3 or forth year he had hauled that trailer to Denver. Just happened that the troopers were looking for that type of violation hard and with Cal plates they new he was going over the 150 mile ag exemption.

Offline SD

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 5127
  • Karma 208
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2020, 02:04:18 PM »
The 150 mile "AG" restriction is from the 1950's when it would take you all day to go that far. Today that restriction is ridiculous. Should be 750 or 1000. And it doesn't matter if you go over a stateliness they will call it interstate commerce and require a CDL (and all the permits & paperwork that go with it).

The GVWR should go to actual weight. I liked a nice 28' Elite with aircraft tires on 8K torsion axles. Gave a better ride for the show cattle and lasted longer on the poorly maintained roads. But the government knew better and in 2012 came up with the labyrinth of regulations we have now.

And with the varied levels of enforcement depending on which state you're in and then what DOT cop you get, it is a true mess. And you guessed it, its not about safety, its about revenue...
JMHO
 <alien>
SD
Tact and Political Correctness were developed by those who lack the Testicular Fortitude to say what they really mean.

Offline 764wdchev

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 53
  • Karma 2
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2020, 08:13:08 AM »
Federal motor vehicle laws state any combination with a combined GVWR of 26,001 and up must have a CDL and meet all safety requirements (vehice inspections, triangles, log book, etc..), but farmers have a 150 mile radius from their farm/field that this doesn't apply to.

I just recently bought a 2021 Wilson 24ft trailer, specifically asked the dealer if it was 14000 GVWR, and they said it was. Bought it, brought it home, and saw the VIN plate said 16,000 GVWR. The trailer had not been titled yet, I called Wilson, told them the story, and they asked "What rating to you want?" I told them 14,000. They made a new plate, and a new Manufacturers certificate. I stopped by one of their shops and the switched VIN plates. They also said they could just mail me the new VIN plate, but I wanted them to put it on the trailer.

You can have a brand new semi trailer plated for 14,000 VWR, but you won't be able to haul much.

Wilson for the win on trailers.
If it was easy, everyone would succeed.

Offline CRS

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 419
  • Karma 4
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2020, 09:38:33 PM »
Should have asked for a 10,000 GVWR.  With a towable over 10,000 lbs you are required to have a Class B CDL regardless of the GVWR of the combination.  The uniform traffic code applies in all states that receive Federal Funds, it's their way of twisting your arm for compliance.
Life is tuff, but it is tougher when you are stupid.

Offline ai er

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 121
  • Karma 3
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2020, 03:15:16 PM »
Ohio BMV states:

CDL CLASSES
Class A
Class A license is required to drive any combination of vehicles with a combined gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, if the gross vehicle weight rating of the vehicle or vehicles being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Class B
Class B license is required to drive any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more or any such vehicle towing a vehicle having a gross vehicle weight rating not in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Class C
Class C license is required to drive any single vehicle or combination of vehicles, not considered class A or class B and any one or more of the following:

Designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver
Transporting hazardous materials in an amount requiring placarding
Any school bus with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 26,001 pounds designed to transport fewer than 16 passengers, including the driver
Where Do I Go?
5 X-bred cows
2 kids
1 wife

Offline 764wdchev

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 53
  • Karma 2
    • View Profile
Re: Aluminum Livestock Trailers
« Reply #28 on: Today at 09:00:49 AM »
While the FMCSA rules are hard to get through. The 150 "Farm Us Exemption" covers most all trucks for a 150 mile radius, where this radius starts has rules to- it is not always your home.

Outside of the 150 mile radius you can utilize what they call "Occasional Personal Use", but the GVWR has to be less than 26,001. This will get you to shows without falling into a CDL.

I do have a class A CDL with Airbrakes, and I don't have the "No manual transmission" restriction.

But, if you are going to use the exemptions in FMCSA 390.39, you should read up on them, and keep a copy of it. DOT officers do not like being recited the laws. But if you follow the exemptions, you can go anywhere in the USA if it is under 26,001 GVWR, without all the CDL requirements. And you are always going to a show....
If it was easy, everyone would succeed.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
42 Replies
24779 Views
Last post April 12, 2010, 02:13:38 PM
by Olson Family Shorthorns
2 Replies
7455 Views
Last post May 11, 2011, 10:43:38 AM
by braddavis
4 Replies
7309 Views
Last post March 20, 2011, 09:51:40 AM
by ALTSIMMY 79
17 Replies
8685 Views
Last post August 04, 2011, 07:16:14 PM
by lebf
9 Replies
7776 Views
Last post April 10, 2012, 12:34:26 AM
by Boot Jack Bulls

Powered by EzPortal

SteerPlanet Designed Websites

SteerPlanet Designed Websites

Steer Planet Classifieds & Auctions

Breeder Directory