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Author Topic: Quick help steer planet.  (Read 7058 times)

Offline linnettejane

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Re: Quick help steer planet.
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2008, 05:07:42 AM »
well.....the ear warmers are....really cute!   ;D  and it was pretty cold...temps were hanging around 0 when this calf was born....ask my husband and he says they weren't really necessary(we kept this calf and momma in the barn for about a month)....ask me and i say yes.......the only issue i had with them was at first when the momma was constantly licking on the calf, she would get them off (the pair i have only has velcro holding it on)...but after a couple days, she finally started leaving them alone...
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Offline inthebarnagain

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Re: Quick help steer planet.
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2008, 08:36:01 AM »
If he can get up and nurse despite standing on his fetlocks I would leave him alone.  I saw more problems with pressure sores from bandages not padded properly or circulation issues from bandages being too tight when I was at Purdue than I would ever care to see and most of the time the animal would have been better off without the bandages.

Offline red

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Re: Quick help steer planet.
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2008, 11:39:43 AM »
he is darling! Don't tell me it's time for ear warmers yet!

DL wrote an excellent article on calving in cold weather. I know it's early for that but here's the link.  http://www.steerplanet.com/content/view/21/52/

Red
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Offline linnettejane

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Re: Quick help steer planet.
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2008, 02:44:13 PM »
no, its not time for them yet....this was a calf we had back in 2004 i believe...we calve in jan and feb....and usually have to use them once or twice a year....
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Offline dori36

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Re: Quick help steer planet.
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2008, 03:42:00 PM »
he is darling! Don't tell me it's time for ear warmers yet!

DL wrote an excellent article on calving in cold weather. I know it's early for that but here's the link.  http://www.steerplanet.com/content/view/21/52/

Red


Good article but I had to  chuckle at "Every calf at Kaiser Cattle gets a polar fleece coat"....or close to that.  When I worked in Wyoming on the ranch where commercial cattle were raised, 1000 cows calved starting in mid February and 90% finished by end of March.  The overwhelming majority calve within a 3 week window with upwards of 50 calves are born every day for what seems like forever!  Putting coats on just isn't an option!  However, good management and getting the heavy (ready to calve) cows out of the meadows and up to the corrals is essential.   Every day you go out on the 4 wheeler and sort out the heavies and bring them up to the barn/corral.  Makes one VERY good at spotting cows that are within a day or 2 of calving. They straw down (unroll several 1500 pound round bales of straw) the entire outside perimeter of a very large barn so at least the cows have a clean dry place to calve.  Of course, not all of them are too bright and some calves are discovered frozen to the ground.  Calf warmers are used at times and more than once a calf has gotten its start in the basement of the house.  After calving, mother and calf are moved into the barn where they stay for about 48 hrs.  In that time, the calf is tagged and dehorned (paste) if they have buds.  They, they're booted out into the cold Wyoming weather.  If they've nursed , it's amazing what they can tolerate.  During the heavy calving weeks, the herd is checked at least every 2 hrs around the clock.  The average on this ranch for successful calving percentage is around 98%.  If you count the twins, it's over 100%. The general feeling is that new calves can tolerate being cold or they can tolerate being wet but then can't tolerate (for long) being cold AND wet.  I learned more than any book could ever teach me on that ranch!  Also learned that ranching is only glamorous in books and movies!!   (lol)
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