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Messages - oakie

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1
The Big Show / Re: My Turn
« on: July 24, 2013, 03:45:18 PM »
I thought that since I pestered a lot of people about My Turn it would only be fair to post the calf that resulted. This calf was born February 1st, was born unassisted, weighed 520#s on July 1st and is just a dog. Very happy with that mating. The cow is 16 years old and is a Simmental limy x.  I'm going to use him on everything next year, very satisfied with this calf, and like most people said; I wish I had used him on more cows

2
Goat/Lamb Chat / Re: Commercial weight gain rations
« on: May 04, 2013, 01:41:52 PM »
Thank you. Have you had any results from molasses and or corn oil? 

3
Goat/Lamb Chat / Re: Commercial weight gain rations
« on: April 30, 2013, 10:22:17 AM »
Thank you! What is the 18%? Guessing protein?

4
Goat/Lamb Chat / Commercial weight gain rations
« on: April 25, 2013, 04:25:02 PM »
I've got close to 30 wethers and bucklings that I am going to start weaning soon. What is a good weight gain ration?

5
Goat/Lamb Chat / Australians/New Zealanders
« on: April 25, 2013, 04:18:02 PM »
One of my friends from the states visited New Zealand and came back with soremouth injection guns and vials that you must have in order to administer the vaccine. We can't get them in the united states. I'm wondering how hard they are for you guys to acquire and if there is a place that would accept an order from the us. He made it sound like vets and reps give them away.

6
The Big Show / Re: Long Range Wormer
« on: March 07, 2013, 12:47:40 AM »
The vet said to use the valbizan drench alongside it.  It isn't supposed to create resistant worms, I'm really curious as to how it will work for you guys though. It sounds like you might have some resistance going on.  For curiosity sake, what state are you in?

7
The Big Show / Re: Long Range Wormer
« on: March 06, 2013, 03:20:37 PM »
while on the topic of wormers, have any of you used Prohibit before? It's an ivermectrin drench product. We haven't used it on the cattle, but I have over 100 head of goats so I thought it would be a good idea to give it a try (alot cheaper than the rest, $20/packet, which doses about 200 goats). They looked like crap a month after the dosing, I hit them with noramectrin plus a month after the prohibit and they shed out all of their worm hair and started packing on the pounds. I'm wondering if I mixed it wrong or something. I don't think prohibit kills the juveniles which could have been the problem...................Did not do a fecal before dosing or after

8
The Big Show / Re: Long Range Wormer
« on: March 06, 2013, 01:23:03 PM »
It won't treat flukes or tapes so that is what we are on the fence about . It sounds like a pretty neat product. Our vet and the rep pushed for Valbizan in the fall (flukes and tapes) and long range throughout the year. I thought it would be interesting to try out on the weanlings once they go from the cows/hills to the bottom irrigation fields. The vet and rep pushed for it to be used on the mama cows while the calves are at their sides and stocker operations.  It's a $.01/lbs though and we're wondering if you see enough gain to cover the additional costs.

9
The Big Show / Long Range Wormer
« on: March 05, 2013, 11:06:11 PM »
Has anyone tried this new product yet? What were your results? What age group of animals was it the most beneficial for you? We had a rep come to town and discuss it with us but I'd like to hear a little more about it before I spend $.01/lbs to worm an animal twice a year.

10
Just found out that some of the other calves on his site do not belong to him and he is advertising them as his and even stole a video of a calf from Youtube that was already sold in another sale!! WOW what a liar!



If it's not a private sale, contact the sale manager and get him kicked out

11
Is that something that can be reported as fraud?


Yup :)

12
The Big Show / Re: foot rot
« on: January 04, 2013, 11:40:19 PM »
I completely disagree that Nuflor will not kill it on it's own.  We had one cow that was a repeat, since been shipped, that I had the vet look at because he was here for something else.  He confirmed foot rot  which I knew but thought couldn't hurt to have him look.   She always was awful in the chute and it was her front foot so she loved to kick with the back.  After nearly taking his head off when the rope slipped, I said hit her with Nuflor and get her out of here.  The Nuflor worked, I don't remember how long but it was far less than a week, and she was fine until she shipped.  I know there are others where we were in the field until late, knew we had foot rot, and treated only with Baytril and it worked.  Yes it is ideal to clean it out but that's not always possible.  

After running cows for 30 years I've learned there aren't many times to say something won't work in general when it didn't work for you.  C Cross I agree the times through the chute factors into the price I'm willing to pay for something like Baytril, Zactran, Zuprevo, etc.


If you have nuflor on hand, go ahead and give it a try. It won't hurt anything to try it out. It has not worked for us (except for pneumonia) and we are in one of the most footrot prevelant areas in the state, we also gave them sulfa bolouses.  If you are only treating one cow the cheapest way to go about it would be the zinc sulfate. If that doesn't work then try the nuflor. Another thing to consider is that nuflor has a 38 day withdrawl.  Like I said before, we have over 250 head of cows, lots of mud and wetness this time of year, nuflor will keep it at bay for about 2 weeks and then it resurfaces.  We have found that having minerals mixed specifically for our area keeps the footrot and coccidia in check.  You might want to check your mineral program if you are seeing it in more than one cow every now and then. We randomly bled some of ours to see what we were deficient in and came up with our mineral program. A veterinarian did all of the blood analysis and mineral mixing




Are you talking about goats or cattle? From what I am reading, they are caused by different bacteria.


I keep cross referencing, sorry about that. I am just talking in general. What I am suggesting worked on both species along with sheep. We used to run a pasture with about 50 cows with 100 sheep. That group seemed to always have one or two in it with footrot. One in particular I remember was a big red simmental bull. He got it to the point of lying down next to the creek. We shot him full of LA, boluses, you name it. He would start to get better for about a two week period and then get the rot again. So since the property had a sheep setup we ran him through the metal footbath and made him stand in it.  That brought him out of it, he was sound until we sold him a few months later. With the minerals we haven't had anything for a couple of years, but we did have some before that, like one or two a month.  We'd get them in and hit them with LA and sulfa but the zinc always seemed to dry it out and get rid of it.  The problem with the antibiotics is that it wipes out the stomach bugs and can take a little while to get them back to eating and digesting like they should. Zinc won't affect that so I would choose that any day.  If you don't have footbath access we use a 2 gallon roundup sprayer and spray it between their toes. It washes them out and you won't get kicked. Do it until they start to kick and act like it's burning.  Goats are pretty much the same method of treatment. I've heard about every remedy for footrot in them and only one has worked.  The LA  was the remedy (and thiamine) I tried last year on the goats, along with bleach and betadine and trimming. That was a long, expensive winter. I stopped messing with the bleach treatments and just started using the LA and thiamine and got the same results that came from the bull, the buck would be good for about three or four days and then crippled up after about a week. It didn't work as long on the buck.


fusobacterium necrophorum (I think that's how you spell it) causes footrot in cattle. When combined with dichelobactor (sp) it can cause it in goats. It only needs the one gram negative bacteria to produce footrot in cattle, both types in goats.

13
The Big Show / Re: foot rot
« on: January 04, 2013, 11:15:45 PM »
Austrailia has developed a genetic test for footrot susceptibility in sheep...  Matter of time before the other species follow suit.


what is the cost/head out of curiosity? I have a doe that had it in her fronts, I treated those and they are over it and it's re-emerged in her backs (was in a hurry and didn't bother with them the first time). So I'm wondering if the kids would be as susceptible or if the sire would help that out.

14
The Big Show / Re: foot rot
« on: January 04, 2013, 06:50:35 PM »
I completely disagree that Nuflor will not kill it on it's own.  We had one cow that was a repeat, since been shipped, that I had the vet look at because he was here for something else.  He confirmed foot rot  which I knew but thought couldn't hurt to have him look.   She always was awful in the chute and it was her front foot so she loved to kick with the back.  After nearly taking his head off when the rope slipped, I said hit her with Nuflor and get her out of here.  The Nuflor worked, I don't remember how long but it was far less than a week, and she was fine until she shipped.  I know there are others where we were in the field until late, knew we had foot rot, and treated only with Baytril and it worked.  Yes it is ideal to clean it out but that's not always possible. 

After running cows for 30 years I've learned there aren't many times to say something won't work in general when it didn't work for you.  C Cross I agree the times through the chute factors into the price I'm willing to pay for something like Baytril, Zactran, Zuprevo, etc.


If you have nuflor on hand, go ahead and give it a try. It won't hurt anything to try it out. It has not worked for us (except for pneumonia) and we are in one of the most footrot prevelant areas in the state, we also gave them sulfa bolouses.  If you are only treating one cow the cheapest way to go about it would be the zinc sulfate. If that doesn't work then try the nuflor. Another thing to consider is that nuflor has a 38 day withdrawl.  Like I said before, we have over 250 head of cows, lots of mud and wetness this time of year, nuflor will keep it at bay for about 2 weeks and then it resurfaces.  We have found that having minerals mixed specifically for our area keeps the footrot and coccidia in check.  You might want to check your mineral program if you are seeing it in more than one cow every now and then. We randomly bled some of ours to see what we were deficient in and came up with our mineral program. A veterinarian did all of the blood analysis and mineral mixing




15
The Big Show / Re: foot rot
« on: January 04, 2013, 02:14:42 PM »
The article doesn't say anything about it, but once an animal gets footrot they will almost always be more susceptible to it. The spring would be a good time to cull if you don't want to deal with it again. You could up the copper( or feed boluses, after you check their blood levels) or feed iodide(if they are deficient in it) and see if it helps but it's easiest to get rid of the animal that is most susceptible. I bought a group of does this summer who were covered in koppertox, really spendy girls does, the guy didn't know how to treat it besides koppertox and LA so he sold out, they are always the first ones to get the rot. If they weren't so valuable they would be gone.

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