Quantcast Recent Posts

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 ... 10
11
The Big Show / Re: Head shape calves from 1950s version shorthorn bulls?
« Last post by oakview on May 03, 2021, 09:13:38 AM »
You're right.  I can't really predict calving ease from head shape very well, either.  Some of the hardest calving animals I've heard of around here were Holsteins and they certainly didn't have a short, blocky head.  Maybe shoulder structure would be a more accurate clue? 
12
Upcoming Shows / Re: AJSA EASTERN REGIONAL CLASSIC results
« Last post by Ameliehilders on May 03, 2021, 12:51:22 AM »
Steer community is the online community for the cattle enthusiast with the variation in the home department. The regional classic results by this platform have the release in the college homework assignments help for the planet chat of the upcoming movie and the scenes of this.
13
The Big Show / Re: The cover of Shorthorn Country
« Last post by Duncraggan on May 02, 2021, 11:20:42 AM »
I wish I had their sale average.

I expected people to complain about her nose. The calf appears to be a fairly tightly line bred animal.

The Shorthorn Country appears to be nearly begging for high quality pictures that can be used on the cover of the magazine on a regular basis. I wish more commercial breeders would step up to the plate.
I must concur that the picture is a poor representation of the Shorthorn breed.
Because of her black nose she would be deregistered from the purebred register, on inspection, in South Africa. Makes sense, but can be a blow!
Had a 100% pure, DNA verified for three generations, pedigree that threw a black patch on the shoulder, out of the blue. Beautiful heifer, probably in the top 10% of the drop, but had to get rid of her.
Have her on feed now and will eat her, hope she tastes good!
14
The Big Show / Re: Head shape calves from 1950s version shorthorn bulls?
« Last post by Duncraggan on May 02, 2021, 11:04:26 AM »
I guarantee you those old belt buckle cattle were hard calving.  Since most of them back then were horned, we referred to them as square headed.  Every breed was the same.  The first heifer I purchased with my own money was a daughter of Bapton Crusader.  She sure was deep, small, and easy keeping.  Unfortunately, we found her in the creek attempting to calve.  We drug her out of the creek, got the calf, hauled the heifer up to the barn on the flatbed trailer and she never got up.  I was young, inexperienced, and learned a lot that day, the hard way.  Those belt buckle cattle were the hardest calving I've had in 60 years.  The only ones that came close were the Dreamboats.  I used several fullblood Maines over the years, but was fortunate in that I avoided Crack, etc.
I can imagine that those 'belt buckle cattle' were hard calving, due purely to frame size and shape. From a logical point of view, if you reduce the size of an animal, all dimensions would be reduced, including the pelvic opening size. From the pictures I have seen the cattle looked like square blocks!
oakview, you have many more years experience than me, but I still can't predict by looking at the head shape which of my calves will be horned, or not.
I like to keep horned genetics close, as I believe they have a contribution to make towards the phenotype. JMO
15
The Big Show / Re: Best New Double Blower Unit
« Last post by lightnin4 on May 02, 2021, 09:12:39 AM »
We bought a Boxel a couple of months ago and it's fantastic.  It's our first double blower though, so nothing to compare it to.
16
The Big Show / Re: cattle on the hot seat
« Last post by knabe on April 29, 2021, 12:22:29 PM »
putative invaders probably have maps of where all the gun registrations are and therefore where the least compliant population is, provided of course, by the government with an easily hackable database, already probably penetrated.
17
The Big Show / Re: cattle on the hot seat
« Last post by cbcr on April 29, 2021, 10:48:19 AM »
Interesting perspective on nukes and the cold war.  You should have been around in the 60's.  When I was in elementary school, we routinely had nuclear bomb day.  When the alarm in the school went off, we bent over, put our heads on our desks, and placed our hands over our heads.  We remained that way until the all clear alarm sounded.  I don't know a lot about nuclear bombs, but I don't think our actions would have truly protected us very well.  We were told the radioactive fall out from the nuclear bomb would travel 30 miles.  There was, and still is I believe, a small nuclear reactor in Ames.  I did the math and our house was about 25 miles away.  We were screwed.  Bomb shelter kits were advertised on TV and I knew several people that built one.  Canned goods that were edible for 50 years and more were advertised.  My grandkids tell me they're now eating that food through the school lunch program, but I don't know if that's true.  By the way, we were told the Ames reactor was definitely on the Reds list to take care of.  When you're 5 o7 years old this kind of stuff scares you.  Lots of stuff scares you at that age.  I remember when John Kennedy was assassinated I was absolutely sure the person(s) responsible were going to drive to my house and get me.  There was an attic door in my closet, so to be safe I put my box of magazines in front of the closet door.  Of course the magazines were all Shorthorn Worlds.

Living in the Midwest, it finally came out that no shelter would work to save us.  Back in the early 80's (I think) there was a movie that came out on TV called "The Day After".  It was about a nuclear war and what would happen.  Here in the heartland there were minute man missiles that had been installed.  They said that the foreign countries that had nukes were aimed right at us.  Outcome isn't good.  Don't know how things would be now that they have all been taken out.
18
The Big Show / Re: cattle on the hot seat
« Last post by oakview on April 29, 2021, 09:40:28 AM »
Interesting perspective on nukes and the cold war.  You should have been around in the 60's.  When I was in elementary school, we routinely had nuclear bomb day.  When the alarm in the school went off, we bent over, put our heads on our desks, and placed our hands over our heads.  We remained that way until the all clear alarm sounded.  I don't know a lot about nuclear bombs, but I don't think our actions would have truly protected us very well.  We were told the radioactive fall out from the nuclear bomb would travel 30 miles.  There was, and still is I believe, a small nuclear reactor in Ames.  I did the math and our house was about 25 miles away.  We were screwed.  Bomb shelter kits were advertised on TV and I knew several people that built one.  Canned goods that were edible for 50 years and more were advertised.  My grandkids tell me they're now eating that food through the school lunch program, but I don't know if that's true.  By the way, we were told the Ames reactor was definitely on the Reds list to take care of.  When you're 5 o7 years old this kind of stuff scares you.  Lots of stuff scares you at that age.  I remember when John Kennedy was assassinated I was absolutely sure the person(s) responsible were going to drive to my house and get me.  There was an attic door in my closet, so to be safe I put my box of magazines in front of the closet door.  Of course the magazines were all Shorthorn Worlds. 
19
The Big Show / Re: The cover of Shorthorn Country
« Last post by mark tenenbaum on April 29, 2021, 07:25:35 AM »
Its obvious to pick on shorthorns for bw. TILL YOU HAVE A 130 POUND CALF OUT OF A GRANDDAUGHTER  OF ASSET SO CALLED CALVING EASE WHO IS NOW ONE OF THOSE BULLS WHO HERSELF WEIGHED 72 WHOS DAM WEIGHED 68 AND WAS CE BREEDING WHOS GRANDAM WAS 0 BW FROM 30 YEARS AGO AND I OWNED ALL 3 2 OF WHICH LIVED TO BE 14 PLUS YEARS OLD SORTA LIKE DS HUH? O0

The cute head is another deal.

To me, they are like the runts of the litter.

It would be interesting to know from a development perspective why that happens in all animals.
20
The Big Show / Re: Head shape calves from 1950s version shorthorn bulls?
« Last post by knabe on April 28, 2021, 07:17:42 PM »


 Polled cattle calved much more easily, even the bigger ones.  Maybe they had flatter shoulders?



polled cattle generally are frailer, more sausage like made with weaker rear ends.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 ... 10
Powered by EzPortal

SteerPlanet Designed Websites

SteerPlanet Designed Websites

Steer Planet Classifieds & Auctions

Breeder Directory