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Offline DL

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ASA Update - potential genetic defect in Shorthorn cattle
« on: January 06, 2012, 06:18:31 PM »
Go the the ASA web page
under  News and updates...

1.6.2012
Reporting Abnormal Calves.
click here


Click there and you will see this


NOTICE: Reporting Abnormal Calves - Digital Sublazation (DS)

-Reporting Abnormal Calves


click on Reporting abnormal calves and you will down load a pdf describing the issue we have been talking about and pictures

BTW I think they meant subluxation not sublazation
Going to church doesn't make you a christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car

Offline DL

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Re: ASA Update - potential genetic defect in Shorthorn cattle
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2012, 06:41:54 PM »
PDF from ASA


Reporting Abnormal Calves Digital Sublaxation (DS)
As we continue to characterize and engage potential problems, it has become necessary to request
assistance from breeders for collecting information and reporting the occurrence of a non-lethal skeletal
abnormality referred to as digital subluxation (DS) (Figures 1 & 2). This request is in response to seven
cases suspected to have digital subluxation during the past two years. The calves have been reported from
herds distributed across the United States. They are normally born alive and most can walk, suckle and
survive. The phenotype in some cases is subtle (Figure 1), yet more pronounced in others (Figure 2) and
hence the condition may not initially be recognized. As the figures illustrate, some calves only exhibit the
anomaly in one rear leg; in others both rear limbs are affected. Some calves exhibiting this condition have
improved in mobility over time, yet others have been euthanized due to worsened mobility. A distinct
outward curvature to the rear pasterns has been noted in all cases, though the severity of the skeletal
curvature is quite variable. Incorrect placement of the rear dewclaws has also been observed. Front limbs
appear to be normal at birth, as well as rear leg structure from the hocks upward. Additional structural
problems may develop as the animal tries to compensate for the luxation of the digit and resulting
lameness. Calves are reported having poorer growth performance, but this could be solely due to the
reduced mobility of the animals with the condition. As of yet, the cause of this condition is unknown.
Thus, reporting of additional calves is essential for understanding the basis of this abnormality.
Reporting Calves. To further the research on this condition, we urge you to report any cases immediately
so that we might obtain samples for examination. Calves can be reported to Patrick Wall
(patrick@shorthorn.org 402-658-4258) at the American Shorthorn Association. Anyone willing to submit
an entire animal can ship the frozen sample to Dr. David Steffen at the University of Nebraska for
examination. DNA samples (blood tubes) of the affected calves should be sent to Dr. Jon Beever at the
University of Illinois. Digital images of the affected calves are helpful and AP radiographs (X-rays) of
both rear feet are necessary to fully document the condition.
Going to church doesn't make you a christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car

 

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