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Offline cowz

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Cattle raising and / or Cattle feeding economics
« on: May 15, 2007, 04:46:54 PM »
Now that fuel has gone up (again), and as we all know high fuel prices lend themselves to higher corn and feed grain prices......What will your coping strategy be?????

For ourselves, we will be trying to raise more feed on the ranch, now that we have moisture.  We will attend fewer shows, feed a smaller show string. 
We usually feed out the calves that start out on the show string, but don't cut it , for freezer beef customers.  Right now, Im even questioning that.

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Offline red

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Re: Cattle raising and / or Cattle feeding economics
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2007, 04:55:42 PM »
We really haven't sat down & penciled things out yet. i know we've decided not to go to the state fair this year. We'll only have smaller heifers & we usually get trounced because most are so much bigger than ours.
We'll probably be like you & use more homegrown forages.
I was reading an article today about the economics of feeding DDG's. They are certainly very cost benefical but it looks like you need to be feeding a large group since they tend to spoil very easily. The people they were interviewing feed out 3500 feed so it is cost benefical for them.
I think we'll be culling more cattle & selling heifers to the farm if they don't look like they're sellable or show material. Also the tests results will be a big factor. Will probably sell carriers to the farm feedlot.

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Offline knabe

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Re: Cattle raising and / or Cattle feeding economics
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2007, 04:58:43 PM »
high sugar rye grass with clover for N from dead bacteria and C from the atmosphere.  actually N is too.  extend growing season with deep rooted perrenials which are bunch grasses and the rye and  clover grow in between.  trying to reduce orchard grass which seems to take over and clump up the pasture.  hey, small guys have to buy corn too.  sell a little bit to friends as free range beef on feed.  they all read "the omnivore's dilemna".  wean at 8-10 months. 
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Offline aj

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Re: Cattle raising and / or Cattle feeding economics
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2007, 09:14:53 PM »
knabe: I think a small amount of nitrogen comes out of the sky with snow. Old timers in kansas have said it.It sounds crazy and I used to think it was a joke, but I think there is something to it. No studies have been done on it that I know of. I wonder if the old practice of "backgrounding" may occurr. Just growing cattle at a slow rate on roughage up to 900# and then put the grain to them. The old frame score 7 and 8 cattle did well on 2 $ corn but I almost wonder if your frame 5 cattle with marbling genetics may come into fashion. With cost of gains running at .75 cents in feedlots I think you want to get feedlot cattle fat in a hurry and get them on the rail. I think the ethanol deal is a good deal because it creates jobs in small towns and ect. But high priced corn will weaning calf prices I think. There is also dried distillers grain byproducts that will keep alot longer but it is higher priced. ;)
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Offline knabe

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Re: Cattle raising and / or Cattle feeding economics
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2007, 10:43:32 AM »
AJ,  lightening also contributes up to 5 lbs per acre in some spots.  Learned about that in soil science.   i have also seen some reports about what i think was too much phosphorous in the ethanol by products in California Farmer.  They mentioned some people add it to make the process more "efficient".  some people are testing the product before feeding it supposedly to balance rations for P.
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