Quantcast Lbs of feed

Sponsors







Author Topic: Lbs of feed  (Read 4301 times)

Offline time-to-show

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Karma 3
    • View Profile
Lbs of feed
« on: November 13, 2008, 06:36:29 PM »
We've always followed the feed 2-3% of a steers body weight...someone I know was telling me how much they were feeding their steer and it was way above that ratio... is there any reason to feed way above that--i always assumed you could founder them if you pushed them to hard to fast...I'm not feeding mine anymore right now but should you if they'll eat more-a lot more?  Just picking everyone's brain.

Offline Kansas Karl

  • County Champion Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 2087
  • Karma 43
    • View Profile
    • Kimbrell Cattle Co
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2008, 06:56:24 PM »
Feedyards feed up to 4% but thats about the max you can even get them to eat
Show Barn Manager for Kimbrell Cattle Co in Hillsboro, Texas

Offline vc

  • County Champion Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1742
  • Karma 55
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2008, 01:25:09 PM »
Their are people in our 4H club who claim their steers are eating 36 pounds of feed a day, we never go over 25 pounds of grain plus free choice grass hay. Their calves do not have a higher gain ratio than ours, I think that once they eat more than they can convert it just ends up as fertilizer. I also have seen the amount of ground squirrels running around so the squirrels may be getting the extra 12 pounds.

Offline SD

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 5125
  • Karma 208
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2008, 01:50:22 PM »
You get nothing but problems when you go above 3%. You actually go backwards because it starts running through way to fast to be beneficial. Law of diminishing returns.
Tact and Political Correctness were developed by those who lack the Testicular Fortitude to say what they really mean.

Offline AAOK

  • Forum Moderator
  • National Champion Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 5264
  • Karma 162
    • View Profile
    • Asklund Acres
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2008, 02:54:44 PM »

It all depends on the animal, and how well they convert.  We always fed in the 4% range, and would sometimes go to 5% with younger calves that needed to be slowed in growth, but needed additional substance.  As fat as judges want calves now, I would guess the norm is now closer to 4% (even though most would have you believe they feed less).

Offline olsun

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 434
  • Karma 8
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2008, 03:30:43 PM »
When I first started to read this, I decided not to reply, but I'm an old fool, and can't keep my mouth in check. I feel that the best way to feed cattle for market is to feed them at least twice a day at as near the same time as possible. Give the animal as much of your selected ration as he will clean up in about 20 minutes. After that time, take the unfinished feed away. He will tell you as he needs more. Feed hay as you choose between feedings. We usually feed lower quality hay for a source of roughage. Hay is only necessary to stimulate the rumen. The above is just the humble opinion of an old man. Thanks for reading it.

Offline SD

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 5125
  • Karma 208
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2008, 03:56:17 PM »
Going to bring up an old post and not try to hijack this post at the same time.

We have discussed on here before about grading of the carcass of show steers and why the bulk of show cattle don't do well (Before someone bites my head off I understand there are those few that do). Could it be from over (push) feeding? Why so many post saying "my steer won't eat" or "my steer is off feed"? Could it be from over (push) feeding? Stress is a factor yes but can you stress a steer by over feeding?

Granted there are some feed rations that can for a time be feed at a higher rate. That said, it comes with some possible hazards.

Is it worth it? If it works. If not it will cost you. Ah, the choices in life.

But I will stick with the "old mans" advice above. JMHO
Tact and Political Correctness were developed by those who lack the Testicular Fortitude to say what they really mean.

Offline Nasc

  • Moderator
  • County Champion Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1148
  • Karma 1129
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2008, 08:26:22 PM »
Olsun-
 Good philosophy and one we use. Like above I do not wish to hijack this topic but if I could go a little rouge here what is your opinion on feeding a standard steer mix from your local feed mill vs using one of these pretty packaged bagged feeds? 


Offline simtal

  • County Champion Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1066
  • Karma 34
  • Never trust a skinny cook
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2008, 08:56:26 PM »
over feeding them won't make them grade poorer, genetics do that.
....Now, they always, in the direst of circumstances, every time liberalism fails, which is every time it's tried, at some point you reach a catastrophe.....

Offline olsun

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 434
  • Karma 8
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2008, 09:36:24 PM »
I would suppose it to be cheaper to feed a feed from your local feed mill than it would be to feed a commercial bagged feed. I would say to feed which ever works best for you. In our area we are seeing a lot of new byproducts from the ethanol plants. I'm not familiar with these yet. The one thing I would reccomend is to use an all natural protein supplement, as opposed to a supplement with urea as a protein. Cattle fed for a longer time on urea tend to have more bloat problems.JMHO.

Offline simtal

  • County Champion Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1066
  • Karma 34
  • Never trust a skinny cook
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2008, 09:38:51 AM »
While were on the topic of percent body weight, I've heard that cattle on cottonseed meal based diets can have 5% body weight intake. 
....Now, they always, in the direst of circumstances, every time liberalism fails, which is every time it's tried, at some point you reach a catastrophe.....

Offline Jill

  • State Champion Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 3551
  • Karma 206
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2008, 09:47:10 AM »
Agree with olsun, we feed what they will clean up, have never had a problem with poor carcass we are generally at the top at our fair.  As far as carcass, I think the holding for 3,4,5 months would do more harm than the pushing them.

Offline time-to-show

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 198
  • Karma 3
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2008, 09:54:15 AM »
We'll stick to the 2-3%, I always figure after we've weighted all three figures (2, 2.5, 3) and adjust to how they are looking--need more, holding good...I will say we go a little longer on the time.  We allow them about 40 min.  This is how long it takes my daughters and I to get ready after feeding before we leave in the mornings but I will say when we first started we used the 20-30 min. rule and we had very few steers that could clean it up and I think it was because they couldn't eat that fast.  40 may be a touch too long but you def. know what they wanted after that amount of time.  We feed free choice hay at night only because they make such a mess in their pens.  One thing we ran into this year on a steer we're trying to hold back a little was a water tank makes a huge difference when locked up in the barn.  We shut his daily gain down from 4lbs. a day to about 1.5 just by letting only have water at night.  Figure that one.  The rest of them got to keep their tanks.  Poor guy.

Offline CAB

  • National Champion Poster
  • **********
  • Posts: 5528
  • Karma 102
    • View Profile
Re: Lbs of feed
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2008, 04:27:06 PM »
  Agree 100% with Olsun on his thoughts about feeding cattle. It is the exact same way that my dad taught us and preached, and preached, and preached. same time twice a day, and cattle are on full feed @ all they can eat in 20 minutes. Water is the most important ingredient. I personally would not use water as a limit control. 2to 3% of a calf's body weight is all I've ever been able to get a calf to eat on average. You may have an exception to the rule, but not very often.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
16 Replies
11770 Views
Last post October 20, 2016, 02:43:12 PM
by woodyc
5 Replies
3186 Views
Last post March 27, 2011, 02:42:33 PM
by flatwoodscattle
19 Replies
7592 Views
Last post April 21, 2011, 10:48:53 PM
by Okotoks
0 Replies
2873 Views
Last post September 20, 2015, 06:29:45 PM
by indianafarmer
1 Replies
726 Views
Last post August 28, 2019, 10:03:05 AM
by Tallcool1

Powered by EzPortal