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Offline mark tenenbaum

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #135 on: December 28, 2019, 10:35:13 PM »
Homeplace has had "Performance Tested Shorthorns" since way back since "Performance Testing became a function per se-Along with Waukaru in Indiana as well. I guess my questions would have to do with Red Rider Drive as he had some very old shorthorn genetics close up in his pedigree and certainly looked the part also-any feedback on Red Ryder? O0

Offline aj

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #136 on: December 29, 2019, 10:26:21 AM »
I have kinda lost track of everything. So has the very hot bull "Hot Commodity" been tested. I had purchased a bull a couple years ago that goes back to Wakura Patent so I guess I need to be concerned. It's kind of funny that bull was tested cleaned of the other 3 deals. Now I have a new one to wonder about.
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Offline mark tenenbaum

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #137 on: December 29, 2019, 02:52:28 PM »
Why would you be concerned about Patent? I think Dale is alluding to DFS Red Ryder who was sired by Red Rider Drive-Who sure didnt look like rodeo-neither did his calves -some of which were really cool Combine him with Strathore Irish Magic-He certainly was suspect "looking" from his pictures-He was supposed to be sired by a "maine" suspect according to his breeder-( that would be GS Irish Sweepstakes) Now you have the basics for Elite Rider who was pretty freaky looking O0
« Last Edit: December 29, 2019, 02:54:49 PM by mark tenenbaum »

Offline mbigelow

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #138 on: December 29, 2019, 04:06:41 PM »
We owned DFS Red Rider 839 flush mate to 844 which is in this calf's pedigree.   We used to wonder how anyone would consider these genetics low birth, calving ease?  We had multiple with abnormally large bw.  When i had a chat with Dr. Byers and Lincoln Job about there 878 calves they said the same thing eradic bw's. We just called it the Red Rider disease.  Mark, i think the magic line may have issues as well.

Offline Medium Rare

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #139 on: December 29, 2019, 05:22:27 PM »
Why would you be concerned about Patent?

Patent was tested in Canada and is listed as an E226x carrier.

Offline knabe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #140 on: December 29, 2019, 09:05:26 PM »
Cow has pedigree holes. Doesnt mean its maine anjou.

Bull looks maine anjou.
"The generation that told us to question authority, has now become the Authority we cannot question!"

Offline mark tenenbaum

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #141 on: December 30, 2019, 05:08:45 PM »
Cow has pedigree holes. Doesnt mean its maine anjou.

Bull looks maine anjou./// Lotta water under the bridge-as Far as Irish Sweeptakes-the fullblood could possibly be from his dam -according to several people who were there-one being related to  his breeder O0

Offline aj

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #142 on: January 02, 2020, 07:55:46 AM »
I guess I assume that "hot Commodity" is a carrier of some sort of the myostatin deal.
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Offline Okotoks

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #143 on: January 06, 2020, 02:27:46 PM »
I guess I assume that "hot Commodity" is a carrier of some sort of the myostatin deal.
I don't think he is. The UK now requires all bull calves to be tested for myostatin before being registered. Australia now requires all imported bulls to be mystatin tested before registering them. I really don't understand why AI sires and herd bulls are not being tested by breeders. If a bull is tested it's a lot easier to make informed breeding decisions.

Offline aj

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #144 on: January 11, 2020, 09:17:31 AM »
Thanks
People can't believe we have such a big moon for such a small town.

Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #145 on: January 31, 2020, 09:16:55 AM »
I have been reading a lot about Myostatin. When Myostatin is inhibited from regulating muscle growth, not only the number of muscle fibers continue to increase, but the type of muscle fibers that increase are the type II fast twitch fibers. Normally the muscle fibers in cattle are predominantly type I slow twitch fibers. Fast twitch and slow twitch muscles have different metabolic pathways for burning energy. Fast twitch fibers draw quick bursts of energy ( speed and strength) from circulating blood sugar and slow twitch muscles burn stored fat. Fastvtwitch muscles are bigger and stronger, but they fatigue quickly after blood sugar is exhausted. The animals pre slaughter and the meat, post slaughter, must be handled with care to prevent the muscle from becoming dark and tough. Before death the muscle may be more tender...but that can change with stress and temperature.
Fast twitch muscle is less insulin resistant than slow twitch because instead of sugar in the blood being stored as fat, it is burned for energy. Myostatin inhibition is being studied as a treatment for diabetes for this reason.
So, when I propose that Myostatin inhibition by the various mutation in cattle is an upstream response to recalibrate the metabolism to better survive downstream stress...at least there is logic to the idea. What is the fattening process other than lack of exercise and a high calorie diet? Cattle are evolved to walk, graze, rest and flee from predators occasionally. Most of the time they just walk and graze. Change the conditions of existence and nature might respond with variations in the dosage of the proteins that gene regulatory networks produce. Some are better, some worse. Heterozygosity is generally advantageous. So, I think the question is not whether a mutation is good or bad...profitable or not, but are these mutations advantageous under the conditions your cattle are living in? Beyond that, are the animals being handled in such a way that their muscles are not exhausted at the point of death and is the meat being handled appropriately to maintain tenderness?
http://www.esalq.usp.br/lepse/imgs/conteudo_thumb/Recasting-developmental-evolution-in-terms-of-genetic-pathway-and-network-evolution-------and-the-implications-for-comparative-biology-1.pdf
"Thus, while the concepts of pathway and network evo- lution outlined in this paper are neither particularly abstract nor difficult, they constitute a challenge to traditional think- ing and experimental analyses in both evolutionary and com- parative biology. Accordingly, their incorporation into the standard thinking of these fields might well proceed slowly."
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #146 on: January 31, 2020, 09:29:00 AM »
I was mistaken about cattle normally having a majority of slow twitch muscle fibers. Only two mammalian species, thus far, have been found to have predominantly slow twitch muscle. Humans and the slow loris.
 https://www.inverse.com/article/33452-chimpanzee-super-strength-endurance-muscles-human
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline beebe

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #147 on: January 31, 2020, 10:13:40 AM »
So if a person had a bull that would increase the percentage of primal cuts and increase the tenderness it would seem like a person in the grass finished business where tenderness is so important would be very interested in that bull.  It seems like a bull with two copies of the F94L variant could be that bull.

Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #148 on: January 31, 2020, 10:37:17 AM »
Yes...maybe. My opinion is it would take a lot of observation and quality control to determine if the final product was more palatable.  The producer would have to understand the physiological differences in the muscle fibers they are producing and have input on the processing protocol. Less fat cover means faster cooling. Cold shortening is an issue. The metabolic rate is higher in an animal with more fast twitch muscles and the internal temperature is higher. This affects post mortem ph. The amount of myoglobin in the blood is less and the meat could be pale or soft. Optimal slaughter age might be younger. All I really understand is that the mutation might be natures way of helping the animal dump excess blood sugar to prevent pathological obesity.
https://www.britannica.com/technology/meat-processing/Myoglobin-content
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline librarian

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Re: Myostatin gene
« Reply #149 on: January 31, 2020, 10:41:28 AM »
Here is the ad our beloved steerplanet is showing me because I have been searching diabetes, obesity and metabolism.  The Myostatin mutation is addressing the same issue in cattle, I think.
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

 

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