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Offline librarian

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Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« on: April 26, 2015, 07:33:43 AM »
This is interesting to me. Listed are the breeders...I wonder where this polled blood ended up.
http://www.lyndonirwin.com/04beef06.htm
First Prize winners were:  (Sex):  (Category):  (Name):  (Owner, Location).  (Winnings)

    Bulls:  Aged:  Golden Hero:  A. C. Wood & Sons, Pendleton, IN.  $50
    Bulls:  Two-Year-Olds:  Scottish Hero:  A. C. Wood & Sons. $50
    Bulls:  Senior Yearlings:  Grand Trojan:  J. H. Miller, Peru, IN.  $50
    Bulls:  Junior Yearlings:  Windemere Tip:  Flecher S. Hines, Malott Park, IN.  $35
    Bulls:  Senior Bull Calves:  Lord Marvel:  J. H. Miller, Peru, IN.  $35
    Bulls:  Junior Bull Calves:  Marys Milton:  J. H. Jennings, Streator, IL.  $35
    Cows:  Aged:  Ruby of Buttonwood:  Fletcher S. Hines. $50
    Cows:  Two-Year-Olds:  Emily Craggs 2nd:  A. C. Wood & Sons.  $50
    Cows:  Senior Yearlings:  Prides Princess:  A. C. Wood & Sons.  $50
    Cows:  Junior Yearlings:  Princess Mary:  J. H. Miller. $35
    Cows:  Senior Heifer Calves:  Hero Maid:  A. C. Wood & Sons. $35
    Cows:  Junior Heifer Calves:  Buttonwood Eva:  Oscar Hadley, Plainfield, IN.  $35
    Group:  Aged Herds:  Herd:  A. C. Wood & Sons. 
    Group:  Young Herds:  Herd:  J. H. Miller. 
    Group:  Get of Sire:  Herd:  A. C. Wood & Sons.
    Group:  Produce of Cow:  Fletcher S. Hines.
References:     Breeders Gazette, September 28, 1904, p. 536-538.
                           Worlds Fair Bulletin, November, 1904, p. 36-37.

Contrasting to the horned animals:
two pictures of Whitehall Marshall, winner of Yearling Shorthorn bulls at the same fair.

From "good Shorthorn Sires"
https://books.google.com/books?id=aA5IAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA4-PA43#v=onepage&q&f=false
According to information furnished the United States Department of Agriculture by the American Shorthorn Breeders' Association, and published in Farmers' Bulletin 612, 1915, the ten bulls which have probably done most for the improvement of Shorthorn cattle as a breed during the last fifteen or sixteen years are as follows:
Whitehall Sultan 163573; Choice Goods 186802; Cumberland's Last 229822; Avondale 245144; March Knight 188105; Villager 295884; Cumberland 118578; Merry Hampton 132572; Lord Baniff 150718; and Whitehall Marshall 209776.


Avondale and Merry Hampton pictures
« Last Edit: April 26, 2015, 11:48:01 AM by librarian »
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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2015, 11:43:01 AM »
I am trying to figure out part of this polled thing. I had not realized polled Shorthorns extended so far back.
Whitehall Sultan was Bapton breeding and was horned (first photo)
Whitehall Sultan sired Sultan of Anoka  in 1908. He was horned.
Sultan of Anoka sired Ceremonious Sultan in 1917. (Second photo)
He was polled and his dam was out of The Confessor, (third photo) a polled bull bred by J.H.Miller in Peru, Indiana, one of the Polled Durham prize winners above.

r.n., check this out!
THE WHITEHALL SULTAN FAMILY, from 1919
https://books.google.com/books?id=jkE_AQAAMAAJ&dq=Sultan%20of%20anoka&pg=PA981#v=onepage&q=Sultan%20of%20anoka&f=false
Beneath the photo of Whitehall Sultan, it says "Whitehall Sultan, fountainhead of the strain.His origin was in a degree fortuitous when the herdsman at Bapton Manor made an unauthorized service. He came into being of a Royal first prize heifer to a bull with an off strain in his pedigree."
All I can find on the off strain sire is that he "was an exceptionally good white bull sold to the Argentine, by name Bapton Sultan"
« Last Edit: April 26, 2015, 04:58:08 PM by librarian »
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline Okotoks

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2015, 12:25:14 PM »
I have always admired the Whitehall Sultan line. In the show yard they were the "Trumps" of the early 1900's. In a thread a few years ago we picked a bull from the past that we would use if we could bring them back and my choice was Browndale.

Offline r.n.reed

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2015, 08:58:45 PM »
 Librarian, in a highly condensed version here is an answer to the questions you had in your previous post.J.H.Miller Peru Indiana was the fountainhead for the polled deal.He had first purchased the nucleas of polled Shorthorns that a guy by the name of Crane had gathered in Ohio.These included the Mollie Gwynns and the bull Young Hamilton and were primarily of Bates breeding.He also then purchased the best cows from Senator Harris in Kansas which were horned.Senator Harris had picked these cows out of the Cruickishank herd before the rest eventually went to the Bapton herd in Scotland.It was from the crossing of these two lines that produced Golden Hero.
 Next Miller purchased Sultan of Anoka from Frank Harding to use on his polled cows.One of the first sons was Ceremonious Sultan that sold to Leemons for around 3700.00 which would be an amazing price if translated into todays dollars.A grandson of CS,Lavender Sultan wound up in the Haumont herd and bred to his 3/4 sister produced the Defender.It might be interesting to you to know that Golden Hero is closer up in Lavender Sultans pedigree than Whitehall Sultan.
 The off strain in Bapton Sultan was Bates.
 Browndale was indeed an influential bull.He was bred in the Carpenter and Ross herd in Ohio and was an Avondale son.As an interesting sidenote H.F.Brown his onetime owner who died before Browndales first calf crop was born, provided the seed money for the Saddle and Sirloin Club that is now on Display at the expo center in Louisville Ky.
Gary Kaper

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2015, 09:26:29 PM »
Thanks r.n., that's really neat.
This is a picture of Lavender Sultan from that same article in The Field. I liked him better than Ceremonious Sultan but didn't put his picture up because I didn't think he was famous enough!
I read that Whitehall Sultan was born in Canada and came in dam from the imported Bapton Pearl.
Did the Marshall in the Marshall Sultan cross come from Marshall in Canada also? He was Minister of Agriculture or something.
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline r.n.reed

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2015, 05:39:12 AM »
 The Lavender Sultan you pictured was used in the Harding herd and is a different bull than the L.S. bull that Haumonts used.
 You should know by now that all good things come from Illinois aside from government.Whitehall Sultan was born on the Illinois state fairgrounds and the Marshall strain had its roots in the Oscar Hadley herd from Danville IL.
Gary Kaper

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2015, 11:51:50 AM »
Thanks r.n., for straightening me out. I sort of was dumbfounded that those RASCALLY Canadians had somehow laid claim to Whitehall Sultan. I cannot find where I was reading that...in the Twilight Zone, I guess.
Would you please identify this roan bull?
I was reading about Polled shorthorns and found this other picture that echoes him, I think. No way of knowing his name.
AND, before I forget, if you have a likely roan bull calf this year would you name him Commander Cody?
Text with the second picture.
https://books.google.com/books?id=eq2n4OuwF10C&dq=Count%20lavender%20shorthorn&pg=PA16#v=onepage&q=Count%20lavender%20shorthorn&f=false
POLLED SHORTHORN
The Polled Shorthorn strain had its early development in the Midwestern States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa, beginning in the eighties.
Polled Shorthorns were known as Polled Durhams until 1919. By that time about 95 percent of the polled strains were "double standards", that is they were the polled offspring from parents both of whom were registered in the American Shorthorn Herdbook. Double standards may be recorded in both the Polled Shorthorn Herdbook and the American Shorthorn Herdbook. The Polled Shorthorn is very similar to the Beef Shorthorn but, as the name implies, it is hornless. Polled Shorthorns became eligible to registry in the American Shorthorn Herdbook on January 1, 1923.
The American Shorthorn Breeders' Association claims that the two bulls contributing most to the early foundation of the breed were Young Hamilton X 49 S. H. 114169 and Ottawa Duke X 185 S. H. 109292.
Whitehall Sultan blood has been used to a great extent in late years, and this line of breeding has been credited with much of the progress made by the breed. Much credit is also due to the introduction of
Scotch blood through cows tracing to Imp. Victoria 51st by Royal
Duke of Gloster 29864; Imp. Princess Royal 64th by Scottish Archer
59893; Imp. Lady of the Meadow by Chancellor 68693; and Imp.
12th Duchess of Gloster by Champion of England 17526.
 Figure 17 illustrates a desirable type of Polled Shorthorn bull.
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline librarian

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2015, 12:52:45 PM »
I wonder if Golden Hero is the first one in line.
This Haumont bull does have the same look.
Even I have to stop studying this for awhile and pack up to leave for Nebraska. Thanks for all the help.
One last of Whitehall Sultan.
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline r.n.reed

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2015, 06:47:59 PM »
 The light roan bull in your prior post is Royal Count Jr.He was a grandson of Roselawn Marshal and was heavily used and intensly linebred to in the Teegarden herd.I dont know the second bull but he could easily be a son.
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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2015, 10:42:32 AM »
I found a couple of Red Poll pictures that show the similarity I see between this type and the Polled Durham type. These must be at the far beef end of dual purpose spectrum and it's very believable that they have a Shorthorn infusion rather than that Polled Durhams had a Red Poll infusion.
These pictures are circa 1950 from Beef Cattle Production in the South, by Williams.

Also this Shorthorn Judging book from 1940 that is entertaining and shows some animals of breeding of interest. The dark ones at the bottom of the page are Edellyn breeding.
Unfortunately, it's very difficult to make out the words. There is a plain text option, I think.

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924002984296;view=2up;seq=2;skin=mobile
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

Offline oakview

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2015, 11:08:57 AM »
I'm leafing through the December 25, 1935, Shorthorn World and Farm Magazine.  There are several Polled Shorthorn herds with advertisements towards the end of the book.  Leemon's ad has a photo of Highland Stamp, just sold for export to Austrailia.  It would be interesting to see extended Austrailian pedigrees that might go back to him.  The Oakwood herd touts their herd bull battery which includes 4 International Grand Champion bulls.  The main herd bull pictured is Oakwood Royal King.  Theiman's have an ad as do Haumonts.  Carl Johnson advertises calves sired by Whitehall Supreme, a son of Rosewood Renown.  There are also several Polled Milking Shorthorn herds with advertisements.

Edellyn Farms has the back page featuring their main herd sire, Browndale Count. 

There is a very interesting article written by Fredric S. Hultz, University of Wyoming.  The title is "We Must Saw off Their Legs" "and we can do a few other things at the same time."  He cites a statement he heard at a recent auction where the auctioneer, Col. A. W. Thompson, proposed that by sawing off four inches of the legs of our herd bulls, the calves would be worth a dollar more per hundredweight and $10 more per head as fat cattle (1,000 pounds).  You need to remember $1/hundredweight was a lot in 1935.  The auctioneer was speaking at a Hereford sale and noted that the Hereford breed had made more progress than most in shortening the legs of their cattle.  He also said the Angus breed had made much progress, too, but the Shorthorns lagged behind.  The article goes on to state that "Quite generally a shortness of legs is accompanied by a blockiness and width of body, especially a width of rear quarters.  These low down kind seem to carry a greater amount of thick steaks and roasts in proportion to their total weight."  It is quite a long article and cites Sni-A-Bar Farms as being one of the leaders in the Shorthorn breed in "shortening the legs."  The author implies that this is the most important step in improving beef production.  Interesting article.  I wonder what 1970's college professor decided the introduction of a full blood Chianina was the most important step in improving beef production.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2015, 11:11:39 AM by oakview »

Offline r.n.reed

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2015, 01:54:27 PM »
Oakview,do I sense a little sarcasm? ;)Librarian,I am 98% sure your second roan bull is Oakwood emperor.He was 1936 International Champion so he could definitely be considered a model type for 1938 as the pamphlet indicated.
The roaning patterns are identical and the profiles are the same.He would be intensely linebred to Royal Count jr. and he is also in the pedigree of Leader 21.
Gary Kaper

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2015, 02:30:04 PM »
Way to go, r.n.
His markings seem pretty unique, so I think that's a match.
Is this THE Bapton pearl, do you think? This book was written in 1907.
 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t5z60d26p;view=2up;seq=198;skin=mobile
'Those who do not understand the old will not understand the new'. -farmers quote

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2015, 02:37:48 PM »
And speaking of Leader 21 and resonating phenotypes, I always thought this one looked a lot like Leader 21.
From the same book, 50 Years Among Shorthorns.
C.I.V. (80707), white, calved 1900, was bred by J. Deane Willis, and was in service in the Bapton herd for three seasons, during which time he was largely shown with much success. He was an exceptionally deep, wide-backed bull, with a rather short neck and plain-set horns. His crops were so wide that they made his ribs look less well sprung than they actually were. His flanks were full, and thighs deep and strong. He was shipped to the Argentine. He was by Brave Archer (70018), from Carnation, by Count Lavender (60545), her dam, Catchfly, by Gondomar (55821).
I think Count Lavender is the Bates cross in Bapton Sultan. I did have a photo of him, but can't find it.
How did senator Harris happen to scoop up the Sittydon females. He had a very eventful life.
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Offline oakview

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Re: Polled Durhams and Shorthorns at 1904 Worlds Fair
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2015, 03:15:32 PM »
In the 1935 Shorthorn World mentioned earlier, Rank C. Forbes, in his article "Shorthorns of Yesterday and Today" states his opinion that Avondale, a son of Whitehall Sultan, was the most influential bull in history.  In the Milking Shorthorn section, Oldtown Milking Shorthorn Farm of Ft. Pleasant, West Virginia, touts the great butterfat production of their dairy herd "rich in the blood of Whitehall Sultan, Avondale, and Rodney."  Pretty obvious these cattle were true "dual purpose" Shorthorns.

 

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