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Offline Duncraggan

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Re: tuli cattle
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2019, 08:30:32 AM »
They are indigenous to Southern Africa and are fairly popular down here in South Africa, especially where conditions are tough for cattle. They were developed in Southern Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, out of the native Sanga cattle. They are polled, mostly, which is an advantage. Colours range from light cream to dark red, mostly in the middle of the range though.
They do well, and are a good base to cross to British breeds to, to give good weaner calves. I have an idea, not confirmed, that feedlots give a penalty to purebred weaners of the breed, like the other Sanga's, namely Nguni's.
If you want 'bullet-proof' cattle, they would be a good choice! They seem to have a lighter bone structure though, maybe because they are higher off the ground due to their walking/foraging ability.
I personally don't think they are as good as Bonsmara's though, a composite breed, but for a crossbreed programme they would probably be better due to their purity and being 'true to type'.
JMO

Offline GM

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Re: tuli cattle
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 11:46:06 AM »
They are indigenous to Southern Africa and are fairly popular down here in South Africa, especially where conditions are tough for cattle. They were developed in Southern Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, out of the native Sanga cattle. They are polled, mostly, which is an advantage. Colours range from light cream to dark red, mostly in the middle of the range though.
They do well, and are a good base to cross to British breeds to, to give good weaner calves. I have an idea, not confirmed, that feedlots give a penalty to purebred weaners of the breed, like the other Sanga's, namely Nguni's.
If you want 'bullet-proof' cattle, they would be a good choice! They seem to have a lighter bone structure though, maybe because they are higher off the ground due to their walking/foraging ability.
I personally don't think they are as good as Bonsmara's though, a composite breed, but for a crossbreed programme they would probably be better due to their purity and being 'true to type'.
JMO
Are they docile or naturally on the wild side?

Offline knabe

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Re: tuli cattle
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 12:05:38 PM »
the ones i helped work seemed like regular range cattle.


only 1 out of 140 seemed bent on charging.

Offline -XBAR-

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Re: tuli cattle
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2019, 12:23:21 PM »
The sativa occasionally leads me down the wormhole and across the Sanga breeds.   Ive looked into Tuli, Bonsmara, Mashona, Boran, etc.   I like the Tuli the best in terms of phenotype.  I like Mashona too.  Always thought Mashona Durham would be a cool nice for a composite.  Lots of good Bonsmara and boran bulls too- they just have huge muzzles, same as Senepol, so kinda off putting aesthetically to me.   End of the day its the same problem as any small breed just magnified more:  finding truly seedstock quality animals to work with is challenging.  Pharo has a Mashona bull on his site you can get semen on. 
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