checks in the mail and blue roans

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farmboy

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Apr 21, 2007
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south webster ohio
At another county fair I saw a blue checks in the mail and the shower says half shorthorn cows and checks in the mail get blue roans
I also heard he died ???
 

pigguy

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Jul 4, 2007
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kansas
i dont know if he died. but you when you cross a black bull and a shorthorn cow you have a chance to get a bule roan.
 

OH Breeder

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Feb 14, 2007
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Ada, Ohio
Mcdonald Show Animals said:
What are the other ways that you can get blue roans and how are some of the better blue roans bred?
Shorthorns in general crossed with black cow or bull throws some interesting colors. vegas x angus have seen a few blue roans. GENES can go a little further on this.
 

justintime

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Saskatchewan Canada
We have 30 black cows that we have bred to a white or red neck roan Shorthorn bull for the past 5 years. About 1/2 of these cows are purebred Angus, and the other 1/2 are Maine/ Angus. Some of these Maine cross cows carry a recessive red gene as we have had red roan calves from some of them that could pass as pure Shorthorns by their colors. I have found the blue color to be harder to get than I expected. Some of the calves from a white bull have been almost totally black  with only a little white on their underlines. The blue roans seem to be really popular and they are easy to sell, at least up here.I have attached some pictures of some of the calves we have had from a white Shorthorn bull and our black cows.  The white bull pictured is the sire of all these calves.
 

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afhm

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I've never been a blue fan but I like those 1st 2 calves.  They look like they will make good feeders and show calves especiallt the 1st one.  How is the bull bred?
 

justintime

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The sire of these calves is the result of a low grade unfreezable embryo. A few years ago, I sold a flush in one of my donors to a breeder in eastern USA> he wanted the flush done to Double Vision but we could not import DV semen into Canada. My federal vet suggested that I just take the donor across the border when she was in heat and breed her, then bring her back to be flushed. This was perfectly legal and it still amazes me that I was allowed to do this and could not bring the semen across the border. When we flushed, we got 12 grade 1 embryos which were sent to the flush buyer and there were also two very poor grade 3 embryos. I implanted them, and was fortunate to get a white bull and a white heifer. Both turned out to be both TH and PHA free.
The dam of this bull is a donor named HC Secret Maid 18F who is a daughter of CCS Marc Drive. We sold 18F to Twig Marston, in Kansas as a heifer calf and his daughter showed her successfully throughout the US. She won her class at teh Junior Nationals and was Champion at the Jr Shorthorn show in Denver. I was able to buy her back as a 3 year old in a sale in ILL. She was our first donor and she was a tremendous embryo producer. We have sold over $150,000 in offspring and embryos from her and we have 3 daughters in our herd and still have some embryos in storage. Not real bad return for an investment of $1500 when I bought her back.
 

DL

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justintime said:
The sire of these calves is the result of a low grade unfreezable embryo. A few years ago, I sold a flush in one of my donors to a breeder in eastern USA> he wanted the flush done to Double Vision but we could not import DV semen into Canada. My federal vet suggested that I just take the donor across the border when she was in heat and breed her, then bring her back to be flushed. This was perfectly legal and it still amazes me that I was allowed to do this and could not bring the semen across the border. When we flushed, we got 12 grade 1 embryos which were sent to the flush buyer and there were also two very poor grade 3 embryos. I implanted them, and was fortunate to get a white bull and a white heifer. Both turned out to be both TH and PHA free.
The dam of this bull is a donor named HC Secret Maid 18F who is a daughter of CCS Marc Drive. We sold 18F to Twig Marston, in Kansas as a heifer calf and his daughter showed her successfully throughout the US. She won her class at teh Junior Nationals and was Champion at the Jr Shorthorn show in Denver. I was able to buy her back as a 3 year old in a sale in ILL. She was our first donor and she was a tremendous embryo producer. We have sold over $150,000 in offspring and embryos from her and we have 3 daughters in our herd and still have some embryos in storage. Not real bad return for an investment of $1500 when I bought her back.

OK SO what is the deal with the donkeys? ;D
 

justintime

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The donkeys are cool beasts!!  They are a source of pure enjoyment and they help pay their way by helping with some halter breaking duties. Each has a very unique personality and they are about the most gentle and understanding animals I have ever been associated with. Our first donkey arrived with a fullblood Maine cow that came from friends in Ontario. (They gave us 1/2 interest in the cow and her fullblood heifer calf as a wedding present). This donkey is named Elizabeth ( I still think she looks more like Charles ) and she has been the ultimate halter breaking machine I have ever owned. I have tied yearling heifers, that have never had a halter on before, onto Elizabeth for two hours and walked up to them, untied them and led them back to the barn without them tightning on the lead. I have watched her and I still don't know what she does, as she is so gentle with them. She will stand in one spot for hours and when she decides to go for some hay or a drink, she will just start to walk. If the animal that is tied to her pulls back she just calmly walks in circles slowly inching them both towards where she wants to end up. It is almost magical how she can work with cattle.
The two Mammoths ( Betty and Wilma) arrived next. A cousin of mine took them on trade for a Quarter horse filly and sold them to us . Theyre also both extremely gentle and we are looking for a Mammoth jack to breed them too. It appears that there is a good market for Mammoth donkeys, as we have found that some of the  Mammoths we have looked at are priced in the $3000 to $5000 range. The last donkey to arrive was Calvin, who has no real role other than providing entertainment. He is the class clown and he is always looking for some trouble.
So that is the story on the donks. As I see it, I don't have a boat, I don't golf, I don't fish, I really have never taken a holiday that didn't revolve around a cow sale or show. I guess that makes the donks our hobby.... and if I thought real hard, I probably couldn't think of a better way to waste a little money and time.
 

knabe

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hey JIT, what's that red thing in the pasture to the left in pic 2? and just to spread the love, i think the last calf is most like his dad and in my opinion (useless) would grade on fewer days of feed than the others.  loins are decently impressive.
 

justintime

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Knabe, the red thing you referred to in the picture 2 is what is called " Tex fencing" and it is used in the oil patch to fence off things that they don't want the cows to rub on. It is made of metal and bolts together and works well. There is an oil well just to the left , that is not in the picture. NO I don't have Oil rights!!!! I wouldn't have this many cows if I did and If I did have this many cows it would be easier to find someone to help look after them. It is almost impossible to find anyone to work on a farm in this area as you simply cannot compete with oil patch wages. For example, a kid right out of high school would clear about 3200 - 3500 per month just washing off equipment with a hose on a drilling rig. Guys with 5 years experience are making $8000- $9000 per month. They have to pay these wages as they lose workers every time they do a random drug test.

These pictures were taken late last summer, and as the grass suggests, we were very dry. The first steer and the last steer pictured were entered in the Open Steer Carcass show at the 07 Calgary Stampede. In this show, the steers are shown live first, then also judged on their carcass quality. Both these steers placed in the middle of their classes in the live show, but both ended up winning their classes after the carcass quality was judged. They ended up placed 3rd and 8th out of 62 steers of all breeds. The last steer pictured ended up in 3rd and would have been Reserve Grand, if he had not lost 3 points for carcass size. He had a carcass weight of 784 with a live weight of 1310. This steer would have not been discounted if he had been sold directly to the packer, but they use a small window for carcass size in this show, and points are deducted from steers that fall outside this carcass size window. Both these steers received the highest points possible for marbling, marbling texture, fat cover, rib eye area and fat color.
 

knabe

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i hear you about the wages for oil JIT.  when my grandmother had a gas well dug on her prop, and no not much revenue, the workers were all excons making about 30k a year as they couldn't find anyone to work when things were slow.  it is tough work.  the people who farmed our ground had a business where they had sludge ponds to evaporate out the water from the wash from the wells.  they purchased really BAD land to put this on.  turns out, that the wash  has phosphorus and something else, i can't remember, but it's not as toxic as it used to be, and so when they drag dirt back over them when they are evaporated down, the grass grows like crazy.  totally awesome how they "improved" the land with waste.  worked so great my grandmother had her own sludge pond made instead of having it trucked as the well was somewhat in a draw.  now that area is doing well.  my grandmother testified in the state supreme court about the sludge ponds how great they were and she became known locally as the sludge queen.  yes, she was used for emotional appeal, but like everything, major improvements have been made, but we still have all the regulations for how things were done in the past, and in typical fashion, we never change the regs or get rid of the program, something FDR was for, but was never enacted, cause, he uh , died and wasn't president, er king, and was the impetus for limiting the presidency to two terms.  two of my cousins both work on farms for someone else in KS, so there's two.  my dad's wife's brother works for an angus breeder and he's 75, there's 3 and he refused a new pickup, tends to the catfish too.
 
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