Do you have a mentor?

Help Support Steer Planet:

red

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2007
Messages
7,850
Location
LaRue, Ohio
This is a question for all. Is there someone that you consider your mentor? Someone that either got you going in the right direction, gave you good advice or just has been there for you? Is it a family member, an advisor or just someone down the road that has always been there for you or once was? I think if we all look at our backgrounds, one person or group stands out more. Who is it for you?

Red
 

sawboss

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
296
Location
Nacogdoches, TX
My Senior year of High School we hired a new Ag. Science teacher, sixteen years later I returned home as High School Principal and much to my delight Mr. Lowery was still there.  He has since retired and I have moved out of the school business, but we still visit at least once a week.  Any time I have questions or problems with our show animals he gladly comes to the farm for a visit, and a look see.  The Ag. Science teacher where my sons attend school is excellent, and sometimes gets annoyed when I question his judgement.  I laugh and tell him I am going to call the "Ole Man" to see what he thinks.  He only smiles and shakes his head, because this ole man was a mentor and father figure to him also growing up.  We have a wonderful bond and swap stories about the teacher that touched our lives as young men, and continues to be a tremendous source of knowledge for us both.  The heart and soul of a good education does not always come from books, but rather from people that touch your life through their caring and giving attitude.  It is a joy to know that Mr. Lowery endured me as a student, inexperienced principal and a lifetime friend.
 

Show Dad

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 7, 2007
Messages
5,127
Location
1 AU from a G2 yellow dwarf star
Red - You always start great topics!! (clapping)

Mentors, I have a few.

When it comes to setting me straight in life, hands down, my dad. I wasted my late teens and twenties thinking I didn't need to listen. It's a big piece of humble pie when your wife tells you one morning that I should have listen to my dad. I have worked at listening to him ever since and life is better. Now if he would just quit spoiling the kids.

I have a few when it comes to cattle. One for showing, another for buying & breeding and the vet for herd health.

Also, I find good advice here on the Planet, too. I have only been registered for a few months but I have come to trust the opinions and advice of some Planeteers. ;)
 

jason

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
3,046
Location
Emporia, Kansas
I am not sure if I have a mentor, but I do have a few people that I look up to and strive to be like.
 

rtnok

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2007
Messages
115
I hve had two one was my grandfather that ran a lot of cattle he passed in 96 at the age of 96. Now its a  older friend down the road,without them I would have been lost. Roni
 

pigguy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2007
Messages
662
Location
kansas
i have 2. One that is a neighbor(not really she lives like 8 miles away but it is about the closest person. and then jason henson that normally goes all around looking at show cattle. he usually finds my show heifers(steers are point less) and he is a great fitter. they are awsome espesally shelly talk to her every day ;D
 

Show Heifer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2007
Messages
2,221
Shouldn't surprise anyone: My Dad.  (clapping)
But a few others that I sure wish I could be like more.....
 

farmboy

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
5,652
Location
south webster ohio
my freind rusty, he got me started and helps in every way imaginable. he takes me 2 shows and fitts mine and helps with everything i do...
 

jason

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
3,046
Location
Emporia, Kansas
I would say my dad would be my mentor, even though I don't always listen to him and end up making the mistakes on my own.  ;D
 

red

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2007
Messages
7,850
Location
LaRue, Ohio
For me it would have to be my grandfather. He was a lawyer that also had about 300 acres of ground. Very much into conservation, nature & livestock. Learned much from him over the years including where to look for arrow heads, what types of grass works best for pastures, weed indentification & bugs. Have had many more afterwards too but he got me started w/ the love of learning & agriculture.

Red
 

shortyjock89

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
4,465
Location
IL
My dad is the one who got me started with agriculture...sure it's the family business, but he taught me how to love it at an early age.  It started with grain farming, and then the cattle.  Now he lets me make alot of the decisions with the herd, and we have a kind of conference between us before anything happens with the cattle.  He lets me make my own mistakes, but he's always there to help if I mess up too bad. 
 

common sense

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
359
Overall, I would have to say my mother.  She has centered me on life in general and taught me how to look at both sides of the coin. She taught me to be compassionate and to never give up.  She has been the best life coach. The biggest influence on my livestock interests was a hired man that we had when I was about eight or nine. He showed me the right way to do things and then let me make my own decisions.  He taught me that we should never stop learning about what we are passionate about. One thing he told me that I will always remember is that we should listen to ALL advice, good and bad, because we should be able to glean information and grow from both types.  Then I would have to say that my husband is the force and voice that keeps me focused.  He is truly my mentor at this point in my life. 
 

AAOK

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2007
Messages
5,264
Location
Rogers, Ar
I've had several.  My Dad taught me about tools, and mechanics, business, customer service and accounting.  A long time employee of our family business, James Coffey, taught me business ethics, and how to treat all people fairly.  Most importantly, he taught me how to work.  He retired with 30 years of perfect attendance.  I'm know going on 35 years without missing a day of work, excluding 4 days in the hospital following knee surgery in 1977.  My Mother taught me about Jesus, and how to pray.  To this day, I know she prays for me daily, as I do her. 

Growing up in town, and knowing absolutely Zero about Cattle Shows, my "Show" mentor was Glenn Ferris, one of the earliest and best Maine-Anjou breeders in the U.S.  The AJMAA would not be where it is today if not for Glenn Ferris' presence on the AMAA Board in the late 80's and early 90's.  Glenn liked to dip Skoal, and passed away from throat cancer in 1993 at the age of 43.  I knew Glen Ferris as a customer at my business, so I called him about some possible show heifers to keep for cows. He explained to me the single most important thing I have ever learned about show cattle. He said," it's all about the cows. Great cows can be purchased for a fraction of the value of an equivalent show heifer". He sold me a bred heifer in 1990 for $3000. That cow was the first Strutt daughter ever exhibited.  We had been to only two county shows when Glen Ferris convinced me to load up the family and head to Kearney, Nebraska to the 1991 National Junior Maine-Anjou Show. Glen told me "the best place to learn it right is running with the Big Boys". He was right again. The heifers placed 11th & 12th out of twelve, but we were hooked. The events and the relationships were incredible.  Our family project, and herd of 9 went on produce 12 National Division Champions, a Res Nat'l Champ bred and owned heifer, Res. Nat'l Champ heifer, and Grand Nat'l Bred and owned heifer, plus, two young ladies who are now very successful business women.  Glenn Ferris taught me that all it takes to succeed is the proper amount of want to! 
 
Top