Feeding Right

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jldshorthorns

Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2007
Messages
11
Location
Alberta, Canada
I have been in 4-H for several years, shown in many shows in Alberta and BC. I have never had the chance to make it down to the states yet but I look forward to going when I do. Well onto the main topic.

Every year my steer just isn't quite finished, he still needs at least another 100 pounds. I was just wondering if people could perhaps give me tips or suggustions on how to get that extra 100 pounds. It would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Jenna (JLD Shorthorns)
 

pigguy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2007
Messages
662
Location
kansas
theres your problem. i would be feeding them at least 2% of their body weight. and i would not let them have free choice to alfalfa. if you can get grass hay that would be great, and let them have free choice. but if you cnat i would only give 2 flakes of alfalfa hay at max.
 

jldshorthorns

Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2007
Messages
11
Location
Alberta, Canada
Awesome! I kinda thought they needed a little more, but the bag said not to feed it over 1%. Thanks so much! I'll deffinatly try it on a steer this year! :]
 

pigguy

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Jul 4, 2007
Messages
662
Location
kansas
well if thats what the bag says i probally wouldnt feed more then 1%. do you know of a website i can find some info out about the feed?
 

shortyjock89

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Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
4,465
Location
IL
Maybe it's time for a new feed.  We feed Umbarger finisher, but you don't have to feed something that expensive.  You can go to your local co-op or feed mill and talk to them and they can help you fomulate a feed that will finish a steer.  A basic ration we use is 1/3 corn, 1/3 oats, and 1/3 barley as a base mix and you can add beet shreds, protein, and fat supplements as you decide to.
 

jldshorthorns

Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2007
Messages
11
Location
Alberta, Canada
Ya see we have some friends that are into the black angus cattle and they have a different ration than I use and their steers always look amazing come show day. I think I will to with that feed. The strange thing is that I never used to have this problem. My first few years in 4-H I had steers hitting the target weight dead on. So its kind of strange. But I will deffinatly think about switching up the feed thats for sure.

And no I dont' know of a website for the feed, I got it from the Co-op so I'm assuming that they might have a link on there. But I really am thinking that it is the feed that I'm giving them thats for sure.
 

red

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Joined
Jan 20, 2007
Messages
7,850
Location
LaRue, Ohio
feed a grass hay. You might try adding a little fat to their ration. Mist on some corn oil. Start out very slowly as not to make them too loose. Also feed them so that they lick the feeder clean & then increase gradually. You can put some flavoring in the oil to make it taste better. Most like cherry or apple.

Red
 

knabe

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,631
Location
Hollister, CA
Hay Variety Digestible Energy (Mcal/lb) Total Digestible Nutrients (%) Crude Protein (%) Calcium (%) Phosphorus (%)
Alfalfa     .8 to 1.1 Mcal/lb                                 48 to 55%                 15 to 20%                  .9 to 1.5%       .2 to .35%
Timothy or Orchard Grass .7 to 1.0 Mcal/lb   42 to 50%                     7 to 10%                     .3 to .5%             .2 to .35%
Tall Fescue .7 to .9 Mcal/lb                             40 to 48%                  5 to 9%                 .3 to .5%       .2 to .35%

not the crude protein levels of alfalfa.  then note the protein level on your feed and the pounds of each consumed.  you can cut the protein level in half very easily, particularly with free choice PREMIUM alfalfa hay which would be on the higher level of protein.  protein helps them grow and delay fat onset.  every steer i've seen win this year i would have called a dink in college, but i've only gone to a few smaller shows, and the winners would have been way down the list even at the CA state fair which had a few nice steers.
 
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