Hantavirus-----Please Read

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cowz

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
1,492
It has come to our attention that one of our very own may have contracted Hantavirus.  Please pray for JoeBoy as this is a very serious disease.

This is a viral disease that attacks the respiratory system.  It is usually carried by the deer mouse that is common in the rocky mountain west, the southeast and southwest states.

People get it, generally, by inhaling airborne particles that contain mouse urine and feces.  Any time you sweep out your barn, and you see mouse droppings, you need to protect yourself.

A N-95 mask is available to most of us at a home improvement store.  At a minimum, mix up a 10% bleach solution 1 part chlorine bleach to 9 parts water) and spray it over the area that you need to sweep or clean up.   UV light (good old sunlight) is also helpful in killing hantavirus.

I don't mean to scare any of you, but as farm and ranch folks, we have a greater chance of catching this than anyone else.  Please read the following links and please feel free to message me if you have any questions, as I have dealt with this quite a bit.   Thanks for listening to my public service announcement! (And no this is not an excuse to put off sweeping out the barn!) ;)

www.cdc.gov/NCIDOD/diseases/hanta/hps/index.htm

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001382.htm

www.cdphe.state.co.us/dc/zoonosis/hanta/hantafaq.html

Here are some "common sense" tips for you all to consider:

Before entering rodent-infested structures that have been closed for more than a month, open doors or windows to provide good ventilation for 30-to-60 minutes. If there appears to be a large number of live mice present, use traps or poisons to reduce the mouse population before cleaning, if possible.

Ventilate the structure before and during cleaning. Avoid stirring up dust by spraying mouse droppings, nest materials and carcasses with a mixture of bleach and water. A bleach mixture of one cup of bleach per gallon of water is recommended.

Use rubber gloves to pick up saturated waste, including nesting materials or dead mice. Bag the waste using plastic bags, and bury or dispose of it in an outdoor garbage can or landfill.

In cases of severe infestation, or when ventilation and dust suppression are not possible, use a rubber face mask equipped with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter.

Seal all holes or openings larger than one-fourth inch to prevent mice from entering a building. Install weather stripping under doors, including garage doors.

Store food, including pet food and livestock feed, and garbage in rodent-proof containers. Rodent populations are determined by the availability of food sources so just eliminating food supplies will reduce the number of mice.

Remove rodent hiding places such as wood, junk and brush piles. Store firewood at least 100 feet from the house. Keep bushes and vegetation around structures well trimmed and grass cut short.

In rural areas or structures with mice infestations, rodent control, using traps and poisons, should be conducted on a year-round basis.

When camping, avoid sleeping on bare ground. Instead, use tents with floors or cots.

 

Dale

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2007
Messages
443
You are right about breathing a prayer for JoeBoy.  A person who tuned pianos at our church died from that disease.  In SW IN we have been told to be especially wary of deer mouse with white belly.  Do your links say that deer mice are more likely to carry the virus?
 

cowz

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
1,492
Yes, the deer mouse population usually explodes after a wet winter like all of us had.  A CU student died last week from Hantavirus here in Colorado.
 
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