Heritage/Native Shorthorn Bull Listing

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For those interested in Heritage/Native Shorthorns there is a list of all Shorthorn bulls currently Verified as Heritage/Native in the reference section on the Heritage Shorthorn Society (HSS) website (www.heritageshorthorn.org). Over 760 bulls from the USA, Canada, Australia, and Great Britain are recorded.  Only bulls born after 1955 that have gone through a vetting process to determine they are 100% full blood Shorthorns by pedigree, and have only ancestors that can be traced to the original 1822 Coates Herdbook, are listed.

The original vetting was done by the American Milking Shorthorn Society through their Native program with additional bulls contributed to the list by HSS.  An updated vetting procedure will be available through HSS starting January 1st, 2020 that will be simpler, quicker, and less costly.  Those interested in having their bulls registered Heritage can apply at that time.
 

beebe

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That is a nice list Joe, good work keep it going.  I harvested a strait native steer this fall out of a Albaugh cow and DMH Minn Max Leader that hung a 67% hanging weight.   
 

cbcr

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The Heritage Shorthorn Society website was launched 2 years ago to help Heritage Shorthorn breeders preserve, promote, and produce Heritage Shorthorns while developing an expanded niche in the cattle industry.  As an organization HSS has tried to be both nimble and dynamic as it responds to the needs and concerns of members.  From day one HSS has fielded numerous inquiries wanting HSS to start a Registry.

HSS has initiated the Heritage Shorthorn Society Registry to provide a better service to breeders, and this brings HSS full circle into a full fledged breed organization.

HSS will be working with the International Livestock Registries to provide the registration services to members and owners of Heritage Shorthorn and Heritage Influenced cattle.

Please go to the Heritage Shorthorn Society website to find out more!  https://www.heritageshorthorn.org/
 

oakview

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The Heritage registry is completely separate from ASA?  Cattle could be registered in both?  Would there be a way the ASA could denote Heritage cattle on an ASA certificate similar to what they did with the Milking Shorthorns and Maines in the past?  Would there be some benefit to working together with ASA?  What do you perceive as advantages to having a separate registry?  I'll try the Heritage website when I have more time.
 

cbcr

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To increase the visibility and utilization of Heritage Shorthorns in the cattle industry it is paramount to have a Registry that is focused both on preserving Heritage genetics, and on the utilization of Heritage genetics within modern Shorthorns (Heritage Influenced).

The Heritage Shorthorn is on the critical list with the Livestock Conservancy.  We feel that there are more Heritage Shorthorn cattle, but trying to work with 2 different registries it is hard to know just how many there are.  With one registry to serve the Heritage Shorthorn it can make a difference.

Heritage Shorthorns are in a favorable position compared to other heritage breeds of cattle because of the tremendous genetic diversity & attributes that still exist in Shorthorns through the extensive number of Heritage Bulls that had semen collected on them in the 1950’s, 1960’s, and 1970’s.  At that time Shorthorn popularity was still extremely high and Shorthorns had not yet been openly “contaminated” by other cattle breeds such as Maine Anjou or Red & White Holsteins.  This “semen reserve” has maintained a rich genetic diversity that can be used today to produce any type of Shorthorn.  As an example, there is semen from Heritage bulls that weighed 1800# and bulls that weighed 3000#, bulls who’s daughter’s milk production reached 20,000# on a 305 day milk test period, and bulls that had carcass data/growth rates that are on a par with Modern Beef Shorthorns.

The significance  of Heritage Shorthorns can be measured in two ways.  First they literally could be called the “mother of all breeds” because at least 38 other cattle breeds have used Shorthorn blood as part of their formation.  Since the heritage lines can all be traced to the Coates herd book of 1822, their purity as a cattle breed is unparalleled.
 

beebe

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Has there been a way established to verify if an animal is native or not?
 

RyanChandler

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ASA has option to have a ‘N’ designation in front of the registration number to denote heritage status.



oakview said:
The Heritage registry is completely separate from ASA?  Cattle could be registered in both?  Would there be a way the ASA could denote Heritage cattle on an ASA certificate similar to what they did with the Milking Shorthorns and Maines in the past?  Would there be some benefit to working together with ASA?  What do you perceive as advantages to having a separate registry?  I'll try the Heritage website when I have more time.
 

RyanChandler

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Be cool to see the list of heritage bulls broken down into which are relevant for production use versus those that are more novelty/preservation
 

oakview

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Who would be qualified to make a list of bulls that are "relevant" and those that are not?  Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.  I know of no one that could make such a list based on the bulls of today of any breed, let alone those of 40+ years ago.  If one person sees a use for any bull, then he is "relevant." 
 

cbcr

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To be verified as a Heritage Shorthorn the animal has be 100% full blood Shorthorn (no outside blood can be incorporated into the pedigree), and all ancestors must trace to the 1822 Coates Herd Book.

The only list that is on the Heritage Shorthorn Society website are those that are verified as a Heritage Shorthorn.

Breeders that are searching for Heritage Shorthorn before there was any outside influence can find them with the Heritage Shorthorn.
 

beebe

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oakview said:
Who would be qualified to make a list of bulls that are "relevant" and those that are not?  Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.  I know of no one that could make such a list based on the bulls of today of any breed, let alone those of 40+ years ago.  If one person sees a use for any bull, then he is "relevant."
I agree, I recently harvested a steer sired by  a not quite frame score 4 bull out of a cow that might weigh 1200 lbs.  He weighed 1250 and hung an 830 pound carcass.  That is profitable even though some people would think that is too small.
 

RyanChandler

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oakview said:
Who would be qualified to make a list of bulls that are "relevant" and those that are not?  Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.  I know of no one that could make such a list based on the bulls of today of any breed, let alone those of 40+ years ago.  If one person sees a use for any bull, then he is "relevant."


My sentence didn't end with the word relevant.  What I said was, "relevant for production use."  Implicit there was beef cattle production.  3000 lb bulls have no relevance in beef cattle production.  Bulls that are frame 0 w/ 2 inches of backfat at 800lbs aren't relative for production use. 


beebe said:
oakview said:
Who would be qualified to make a list of bulls that are "relevant" and those that are not?  Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.  I know of no one that could make such a list based on the bulls of today of any breed, let alone those of 40+ years ago.  If one person sees a use for any bull, then he is "relevant."
I agree, I recently harvested a steer sired by  a not quite frame score 4 bull out of a cow that might weigh 1200 lbs.  He weighed 1250 and hung an 830 pound carcass.  That is profitable even though some people would think that is too small.

Sounds perfect to me.  The economics of the matter make the strongest case for whats relevant and whats not.
 

Cabanha Santa Isabel - BR

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The Heritage Shorthorn register and preservation is a great idea.
Useful cattle there and makes a new option for bloodlines in future.
My unique concern is that bulls are checked based on pedigrees only.
As all here in this forum already read, many and many bulls are pedigrees fake.
I just think that a second and final certificate should be done after a DNA confirmation through philogenetic analysis.
It's a valueable genetics and must to be avoid use it on wrong cows.
 

cbcr

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Red Holstein is not allowed in the Heritage Shorthorn.  The American Milking Shorthorn Society has allowed a great amount of Red Holstein genetics into the breed.  There are Milking Shorthorn animals that are over 50% Holstein blood.

The amount of actual Milking Shorthorn blood in the breed is concerning to many breeders and they are wanting to work toward bringing the purity of the Milking Shorthorn to a much higher percentage.
 

Cabanha Santa Isabel - BR

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Dairy Shorthorns in Uk also allowed Holstein, as well as Norwegian Red, Swedish Red, Ayrshire, Illawarras, Red Danish. They starts the crossbredings on the 60's and now is very rare find real pure Dairy Shorthorn on UK without infusions.
Seems like Shorthorn is an extinct breed.
 

cbcr

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Cabanha Santa Isabel - BR said:
Dairy Shorthorns in Uk also allowed Holstein, as well as Norwegian Red, Swedish Red, Ayrshire, Illawarras, Red Danish. They starts the crossbredings on the 60's and now is very rare find real pure Dairy Shorthorn on UK without infusions.
Seems like Shorthorn is an extinct breed.

That is the same problem here in the US.  What the AMSS did when they allowed those outside breeds, they gave them full Milking Shorthorn numbers.  When we started our registry, we were noticing that many of our Scandinavian breeds were showing a percentage of Milking Shorthorn.  After following the trail, we discovered that the Norwegian bull K.Schie was identified as a Milking Shorthorn and had no ancestry showing for him.  We added several generations to his ancestry and then we had to correct his ID so that his Norwegian Red number was the primary number.  Also the Illawarra were given full Milking Shorthorn numbers and in doing so offspring of those bulls born in the US were not being included in the International proofs at Interbull.

With so much outside breed influence the Milking Shorthorn for the most part is nothing more than another Red Holstein as many of them today are over 50% Holstein genetics.  Breeders are finding out just how little Milking Shorthorn genetics are in their cattle and many are looking for ways to bring the purity of the Milking Shorthorn up to a much higher level.  If they don't the breed may very well find itself in extinction, this is a comment that I have heard several times from geneticists and others in the last couple of months.  This is not only a problem in the US, but all other countries that have Milking Shorthorn.
 
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