History of Angus Sires

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JSchroeder

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I was working on this for my dad who doesn't know the difference between the big name Angus bulls and it's sort of taken on pet project status.  It's basically a bit of a family tree for the big name Angus bulls but I'm sure I've missed some.

Does anybody notice a bull that I might have missed?  I've tried to keep the criteria for adding a bull that they must have sired other AI sires themselves.
 

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afhm

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Lovana, Gold Spur 8 Million, OCC Anchor, Jetliner of Conga 707, Spur Emulous Master, Fullback 9FB3, Northern Improvement, New Design 878, New Design 1407, Suagahatchee.  I can't tell you all the details on them, but I do know they all have a place in Angus history for being great producers.
 

Show Heifer

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Not trying to start an arguement, but, IMO 1407,878, Fullback are all too young to be considered "great breed changers".....give them 10 years or so, then I might entertain the idea!!!
In fact, I used 878 and thought the calves would not even make good feedlot calves! Guess it is a matter of opinion!!
 

knabe

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might be the crosses with 878 and what he works on.  out in CA, he's really popular.  he is homozygous for T1 tenderness gene, and hetero for the other two.  both Cal Poly's use him.  cal poly slo is where mike wall runs the beef dept and who ran shorthorns when they had them when they sold 5 cows to tim ohlde, one of which either her or a daughter produced jakes proud jazz.  ohlde used to sell several steers at a poly sale every year some 20 years ago which i helped participate with with a lot of talented people.  i agree on a little more time.

to me the most intersting thing about the tenderness genes is how for the most part, people are saying these cattle look different, the most common comment being that SC is negative and they are pinchy in the heartgirth.

also found this intersting tidbit.

The Animal Science Department received more than $1.3 million for its animal nutrition research and instruction programs as the result of a settlement of an industry-wide class action suit.  Cal Poly was not a plaintiff in the original suit resulting in the settlement, but was chosen to receive the funding because of its strong animal nutrition program. “This money will significantly enhance the department’s ability to do research and educate students about cutting-edge technologies that will ultimately benefit California,” department head Andrew Thulin said.  The department received a $500,000 check  June 29 and received another for $818,332 in December from a settlement fund involving a suit by purchasers of animal feeds
against the makers of a synthetic animal feed ingredient called methionine. The ingredient is an amino acid found naturally in soybeans thatis a key component of swine and poultry feed.
The original lawsuits, filed in California, accused several international synthetic methionine manufacturers of global price-fixing.  The court-approvedsettlement provided that at least $500,000in payments agreed to by the methionine makers is used to furtheranimal nutrition research and education.  Attorneys for the plaintiffs, Dario de Ghetaldi ofCorey, Luziach, Pliska, De Ghetaldi & Nastari andMichele C. Jackson of Lieff Cabraser Heimann &Bernstein proposed Cal Poly receive funding andthe court agreed. Jackson and de Ghetaldi said in
a joint statement that they are sure Cal Poly willput the funds to good use and their law firms are gratified by being able to assist Cal Poly’s AnimalScience program.  The strength of the University’s program and  its partnership with a strong advisory board ofindustry representatives aided Cal Poly in receivingthe settlement funding, Thulin said. “Cal Poly’s
animal science department is a national leader inundergraduate training in animal nutrition andreproductive physiology. We’re expanding andimproving the biotechnology program and we’reparticularly strong in beef, equine, poultry, andswine studies,” Thulin said
 

DL

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The Advantage Cattle Board is packed with Angus breeders and I am sure they can help you out - if you don't breed Angus on that board you are like the red headed step child!
 

CAB

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  Knabe, interesting to finally know where some of the money went for the lycene price fixing. I kind am of the opinion that the farmers that had to buy the higher priced products maybe should have received some of those funds. Thanks for the info though. Cab
 

jimmyski

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Colby, KS
dragon lady said:
The Advantage Cattle Board is packed with Angus breeders and I am sure they can help you out - if you don't breed Angus on that board you are like the red headed step child!

DL,
You are absoulutely correct about the Advantage board!! Most of them seem to have an inborn hatred for research as well. I tried explaining to them where the heifer pregnancy EPD came from and what exactly it was, and a couple of them, (angus2 more specifically, still get fired up thinking about that discussion) attacked me about thinking that academia was superior to the commercial producer and that we thought they were a bunch of morons. When in fact I almost think the complete opposite, even though I am working on a Master's Degree. Too many times we fail to see the overall needs of the commercial producer within this industry, when they are overwhemingly the most populous and important part. We continue to put out more and more EPD's that if you are an older cattleman, who is not in the Seedstock industry or recieved a degree within the last 10 years, you most likely(there are exceptions to this) will not be able to understand, comprehend, and viably use the data that is being provided. We as an industry need to take better note of this and either provide better educational tools (even more than BIF) or try and reduce the amount of EPD's that are being produced into more justifiable means such as producing the one's that are considered ERT's along with maybe a few that are considered indicator traits.
 

knabe

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good points jimmyski.

on the compensation.  if it went to the farmers, it would be a check probably for like 10 bucks each, and the check would have bounced.  this actually does happen in most of the stock market fixing lawsuits.  so in effect, this lawsuit and it's distribution in effect is more effective than a beef checkoff thingy.    only problem is that the money doesn't go to a specific nutritionaly study, only the program in general, although they probably will do some sort of study, hopefully not another implant study of which i think there at least 175 in the literature.  to me, the most beneficial nutritional study would be water soluble carbohydrates in pastures throughout the year and what is the total available through the whole year with what forage, rather than just the obvious growing season totals.  i'm thinking perrenials might do good in this area, particularly deep rooted natives.  also, what is the water soluble carbohydrate availability of different forages in the dry season if they can't do it over the whole year for some strange reason.  pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture pasture 

on epd's, my bias against them is that they are too many days on feed motivated, rather than lbs calf per pound cow body weight or something similar which would allow for different frame sizes to be compared on a different basis other than just lbs calf weaned.  there are virtually NO studies of measuring feed intake in beef and lbs calf.  most is in residual feed intake, and the new markers from bovigen are this as well.  my ideal experiment would be to take 30 so called great cows against a randomly selected commercial herd for a given area, measure the feed intake and lbs weaned calf with as little inputs as possible, or whatever is appropriate that would simulate a commercial operation and have at it.  of course there is no device known to man that can do that in a pasture situation that i am aware of.  dairy, on the other hand can easily do it.  i guess you could do it by feeding pasutre clipings in the feed bunk, but then you wouldn't measure calorie loss trapsing all over the pasture.
 
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