Muscle Builder

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renegade

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Joined
Jun 30, 2007
Messages
725
Location
Caldwell, Idaho
I was wondering if anyone used muscle builders for their steers/bulls and which of these three they like better(Mor,Magic, and Maxum).
 

red

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Joined
Jan 20, 2007
Messages
7,850
Location
LaRue, Ohio
only problem I've seen w/ any of these products is that you can ruin them structuraly. If the steer is not 100% sound on his feet you can end up w/ a train wreck. Saw a steer over the weekend that is on a similar product & he could hardly walk.

Red
 

AAOK

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Joined
Jan 30, 2007
Messages
5,264
Location
Rogers, Ar
Natural Glo, by ADM will increase muscle, fat, and hair quality.  If you add 1 -2 pounds/day to your usual ration, it will not intenseify structural problems, and it will not upset the balance of your ration.
 

chambero

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Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
3,207
Location
Texas
I'd recommend something made by a major ag company - like the common implants (Revalor) and optaflexx.  More research went into them.
 

knabe

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Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,630
Location
Hollister, CA
here's a warning on Ractopamine hydrochloride (paylean)

1. Ractopamine hydrochloride is beta-adrenergic agonist. Individuals with cardiovascular disease should exercise special caution to avoid exposure to this medicated feed (Required on Premix and Supplement labels, only).

if you are selling your steer through auction to a heart patient, this might be an issue?
 

knabe

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Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,630
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Hollister, CA
here's another warning

Pigs fed ractopamine hydrochloride may be at increased risk for exhibiting the fatigued/downer pig syndrome particularly when marketed at high body weights. Pig handling methods to reduce the incidence of fatigued/downer pigs should be thoroughly evaluated prior to initiating the use of this medicated feed.

interesting.
 

chambero

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Feb 12, 2007
Messages
3,207
Location
Texas
There would be a big difference in direct exposure of humans with increased sensitivity (i.e. heart disease) to the chemical vs. ingestion of animals that had been fed it.  Exposure through ingestion of meat would be at worst several orders of magnitude less than exposure to the product directly.  Same with any other chemical humans use in agriculture.  FDA is pretty tough to get get something approved if there is almost any type of measurable risk.  All we can go on is what is FDA approved or not.  Optaflexx is for cattle.

I would trust something that has at least been through the process much more than "supplements" that are exempt from the process.  Never mind if they work or not, nobody has really looked at the potential effects of the concoctions.  Knabe - I know you don't think much of government regulations, but this is one area where there ought to be more.  Humans can buy stuff with more adverse health affects at a GNC than they can from their pharmacist.  I don't feed "supplements" to myself or my animals.
 

knabe

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Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,630
Location
Hollister, CA
i guess i could clarify my position on regulations.  regulations usually come in spurts like E. coli scares, accounting scares, etc. with accounting, arthur anderson would have felt it in the market place, but no, the government had to give them the death penalty.  what the government could have done was not allow them to continually consolidate and foster a little good ol fashion competition.  without providing a number, i feel most regulation feels good, but does little except raise cost.  i find the lack of regulations in the "natural" medicine arena a little hypocritical as well.  that crowd is usually all over pesticide use, transgenics etc, but when it comes to their turf, heaps of irony bubble to the surface.  i constantly remind myself the reason we fought for independence was that regulations (taxation) cost exceeded the revenue or benefit generated from them in the first place.  regulations i'm for are the one's for pesticide application, which, in general, have been effective, particularly the part about math, dilutions, calculating how much you will need for the application, cleaning up, and sanitation areas.  the government seems especially adept at making regulations and then violating them, like fannie mae and the housing situation.  there is NO WAY people should be able to purchase a house without some sort of equity or risk, ie 20% down and a monthly payment not to exceed 30% of gross income.  now that was a good regulation, but who was the biggest violator and propgator?  why the government, and they passed all that risk on to taxpayers, where in the free market, even if lenders would have gone astray of this, the market would have corrected this a lot faster and with clearer consequences.  not only that, but housing prices would be reflective of their true value.  but we can't have that either, because the government generates revenue from an ever increasing property tax value.  kinda like social security.  the longer we allow a bigger percentage of our working capital to be tied up into this mess, the harder the fall is going to be.  i guess in one respect, it will present an opportunity, just like in 1932-35, when the private sector was experiencing a boom in growth compared to the government, contrary to popular knowledge.  a funny regulation in science is that companies can no longer give out novelty gifts like pens, coffee mugs etc, cause it might "sway" people's thinking.  the abuse targeted was doctors receiving gratuities, of which stanford is obviously a benefactor and abuser in the past, including the president of the university in the form of expensive sailboats etc.  how to corral this as oppossed to zero tolerance?  fuel competition, rather than consolidate continually.  but the government won't, because it's easier to "control" fewer companies.  they are after the 50 employees or less companies.  when they are gone, there is no more engine. 
 
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