NAIS

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Should there be a National Animal Identification System

  • Yes

    Votes: 4 57.1%
  • No

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Maybe

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 1 14.3%

  • Total voters
    7

renegade

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2007
Messages
725
Location
Caldwell, Idaho
:)Hi i am the sister of renegade. this is my speech. it is really gooooooood! but i need to slim it down to 8 min. can you guys help? ???

The Finish Line For Major Animal Disease Epidemics

I feel for the thousands of herds and flocks that were euthanized and for the hundreds of farmers who watched as their kids show animals were slaughtered and many generations of genetics were destroyed right before their eyes. And for the thousands who have lost their entire herd or flock and watched their whole lives thrown right out of the window. This all due to major animal disease epidemics that broke out around them, and took weeks to find and months to contain. These epidemics all could’ve been prevented or even caught earlier if we would’ve had the National Animal Identification System that we have today.

N.A.I.S. or the National Animal Identification System was introduced in the year of 1993. Allflex introduced the first electronic identification or EID products to track any animal that would leave the premises of any person; jump starting the National Animal Identification System.

The voluntary system will reduce the time it takes for animal health officials to respond to major animal disease out brakes and to trace the affected animal. But to make sure NAIS becomes an effective system we all must take that first step and register our premises with the USDA. If we all do this we can speed responding time and protect our animals, as well as our neighbors.

Today there are approximately 400,000 premises registered with the USDA. But that is only a handful out of the approximately 1.4 million premises with animals in the US. But it is more than double the 170,000 premises registered in Australia. And more than the premises registered in Canada. This is a good start but to be effective we must register our premises and spread the word for others to register their premises. One of the ways the USDA is spreading the word is through their partners; and FFA is one of those partners.

Today, FFA is once again in the vanguard for U.S. agriculture. One of Secretary Johanns’ top priorities is to implement a voluntary national animal identification program to speed response time when there are outbreaks of highly contagious animal diseases; where the goal is a 48 hour trace back capability because sadly for the first time in American history we have to be prepared for agro-terrorism which is a fact we cannot afford to ignore. But even without the fear of agro-terrorism we still come face to face with the problem of major animal disease epidemics that are costly to our country as well as thousands of farmers who lose their breeding and showing animals when these epidemics break out.
For example, in 2003, there was an outbreak of Exotic Newcastle Disease in California that began in two backyard poultry flocks.  It took 7 months to eradicate END at a cost of nearly $130 million in federal funds alone.  There were 22 commercial premises affected along with 2,400 backyard flocks.  Nearly 3.2 million birds had to be euthanized, and more than 1,600 federal and state personnel were involved in the disease-fighting task force.  In addition, sanctions from other countries prohibiting imports of U.S. poultry cost up to nearly $1 million per week during the outbreak.
We could look at any other example, just like the 80% loss in beef trade in 2004 following the discovery of BSE in one U.S. cow in December 2003.  That cost us more than $2 billion, just in the year 2004.
What about bovine tuberculosis?   Since 2002, USDA has spent about $90 million on indemnities alone for diseased or suspect cattle.  More than 28,000 cows have been destroyed over the past five years to prevent the spread of bovine TB. My compassion goes toward the 30 plus herds that have been forced to depopulate due to bovine TB - they basically had no choice. I ache for the purebred breeder who watched as his genetics were slaughtered and his kids’ show animals were sent to slaughter because his herd was infected with bovine TB; and for the generations of dairy farmers who are cow less because of the disease. And also for the countless others who lost their entire herd because of bovine TB. The social, emotional, financial, psychological and yes political ramifications of this issue are enormous - the cattle industry and all the ancillary components are struggling to survive - these people were stuck in a vortex over which they had no control.

But with just these few examples, it becomes very clear how costly highly contagious diseases can be and how important it is to quickly identify the animals affected so we can cut losses, reduce delays and retain markets; the traceability of  these diseases is critical.

And with the agreement, that the National FFA Association has signed, we have pledged to help encourage farmers and ranchers to take that first step and register their premises.  The National FFA Organization will be developing instructional materials, conducting outreach and signing producers up. Us children involved in the National FFA Organization are the future of agriculture in the United States.  As this Nation’s next farmers, it’s fitting that we are at the forefront of NAIS, and everybody is excited about our involvement in the program. Our goal is to obtain 50,000 registrations over the one-year agreement.  We are filled with energy and enthusiasm for this program, and there are nearly 500,000 FFA members on the NAIS team.
There also been a cooperative agreement with the National Pork Board.  Their objective is to bring 100 percent of the commercial producers into NAIS—that’s 36,000 pork producers.  And there will soon be other signings, and additional agreements with other organizations.  In fact, because there are so many partnerships, efforts will be effective in reaching producers and encouraging them to participate in NAIS, the government set aside up to $6 million to fund similar agreements.
All partners understand that the goal for NAIS first and foremost is to protect animal health.  It’s designed to help producers safeguard their flocks and herds, to protect their neighbors and to preserve their profits. NAIS also builds confidence in the health and wholesomeness of U.S. livestock. The extensive animal ID program enables us to meet the international obligations we face in the world market.  Having the system in place will smooth the way for livestock exports.
“The federal voluntary level of NAIS provides a modern, streamlined information system that helps producers and animal health officials respond quickly and effectively to animal health events in the United States,” said Bruce Knight, undersecretary for USDA’s marketing and regulatory programs.  “Rapid disease response limits the impact of an outbreak on a producer’s operation--or can stop disease spread before it reaches the animals.  Choosing to be a part of voluntary NAIS ensures a producer of needed information, when they need it most--to protect their animals and their investment.”
But, why participate in NAIS? Your voluntary participation means that you will be notified quickly when a disease outbreak or other animal health event might put your animals at risk. Choosing to participate ensures you will receive the information you need - when you need it most - to protect your animals and your investment. With timely, accurate information, we can contain a disease outbreak or other animal health event more quickly and more effectively. Rapid disease response limits the impact of the outbreak on your operation - and could even stop disease spread before it reaches your animals.
But still not everybody agrees with the security of NAIS.
 “Organic, Local Food Consumers, Livestock, Bird and Horse Owners: do you know that the USDA Plans to make every owner of even one horse, cow, pig, goat, sheep, chicken or pigeon register in a Government database and subject their property and animals to constant Federal and State Government surveillance?

’Under the present USDA plan - National Animal Identification System - as of January 1, 2008:
EVERY HOMEOWNER with any animals (whether for food, profit or pleasure) must obtain a 7-digit USDA ID number keyed to Global Positioning System satellite surveillance coordinates, with all the property and owner’s information permanently stored in a USDA database.
EVERY ANIMAL must be tagged with a Radio Frequency tag or chip, readable at a distance, with a 15-digit USDA ID number.
THE OWNER MUST REPORT, within 24 hours, every sale or purchase of an animal, every death or slaughter, every missing animal, every placement or loss of an ID tag, and every time an animal leaves or returns to the owner's property.’-USDA

This plan will drive small farmers out of business and will prevent citizens from raising animals for food or pleasure. If you are currently buying locally grown meat or eggs, this will impact you,” said Hen Whisper, NAIS Opposer.
Eldridge Cleever once said, “You are either part of the solution or part of the problem, while this is America and we all can rant - sometimes ranting without action borders on whining.”

Eldridge Cleever was right we can be part of the solution, or part of the problem. I would rather be part of the solution and together we all can be. We can rant and rave all we want but then we are only part of the problem. The problem being major animal disease that spreads quickly, kill thousands of animals and sometimes humans, and cost millions for farmers, the government, and everyone in the nation alike. NAIS is only the first step on the long road to the prevention and the finish line for major animal disease epidemics.   :eek: (clapping)

please help!!!!!!!! also what are your veiws on this?

do you guys have any memorization tips? this would help alot!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks
 

knabe

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,631
Location
Hollister, CA
don't get offended, this is not meant to be personal, but here goes.


400,000 out of 1,400,000 is not a handful, it's 28.57%

they are not spreading the word, they are imposing it through lack of choice

170,000 in aus, out of how many, what's their PERCENTAGE?

if the goal ;is 48 hour trace back, what is it now?

why are we at risk now as opposed to the past?  today we have vaccines, antibiotics etc, which we didn't have in the past

newcastle disease was not agroterrorism, though still a problem.  part of that inflated cost figure is to sensationalize the issue.

our media is more responsible for loss of money than any disease could ever be.

just look at E. coli and the refusal to implement irradition.

what about TB in bison herds and ted turner's herd and the yellowstone herd.

one of the best tools for controlling disease has always been lack of travel.  we have consolidated our processing and marketing, which maximizes interfaces. 

bringing in 100 percent of producers doesn't sound voluntary

all partners understand nothing.  decentralizing this pathetic mess is a much more historically proven method.

what am i going to do DIFFERENT when i get notified as oppossed to before, just create a conduit for the government to kill all my animals which may be false positives.  who will stop the government from their zealousness?

NAIS is only another step to drive small producers out of business.

I totally disagree with the flow of the speech, the conclusions, the lack of balance and so much more.  i think it rambles more than i usually do.  hard to tell what your position is.  nothing personal.
 

knabe

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,631
Location
Hollister, CA
to me, this is what i think of when i hear handful

Nine Democrats vote no on House resolution marking Christmas

yet i think 8 of those nine vote FOR ramadan.  if this isn't hypocrisy in the extreme, i don't know what is.  what this means is, that the only unassailable position is to be in the minority.  think long and carefully folks.
 

renegade

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2007
Messages
725
Location
Caldwell, Idaho
Knabe, this is a speech not just some random thing. to our professional judges this was a very good speech. I did not win with this speech because i won the extempt group. but my sister did win with her speech on eminent domain.

nothing personal but the last sentence of the agroterrorism paragraph before it went into talking about END,BSE, and Bovine TB was:  But even without the fear of agro-terrorism we still come face to face with the problem of major animal disease epidemics that are costly to our country as well as thousands of farmers who lose their breeding and showing animals when these epidemics break out.
i do understand that the epidemics are not the most costly thing but they are very expensive.

but thanks for reading it and replying it helped!
 

mccannfarms

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
243
Location
Falcon MO
renegade said:
This plan will drive small farmers out of business and will prevent citizens from raising animals for food or pleasure. If you are currently buying locally grown meat or eggs, this will impact you,” said Hen Whisper, NAIS Opposer.
Eldridge Cleever once said, “You are either part of the solution or part of the problem, while this is America and we all can rant - sometimes ranting without action borders on whining.”

that quote is exaclty what makes me mad over the whole topic i mean think a person with a handfull of animals is going to have it a lot easier than say a feedlot that is going to hire extra employees just to do nais work so in no way is it gouing to drive small farmers out of buisness

is this your 1st speech? I thought that it was interesting, i liked the facts the only 2 things that stuck out in my mind about it that could be improved were when you were giving the premise registration facts you talk about the US and then compare us to Austrailia which is good then i think that the transition is choppy when i read it although it may not be when u give it but just my thought and then when u talk about the poultry issue and you say "eraticate END" i think that the "END" needs to be omitted as to me it seems to be redundent and dumbs down your speech

well good luck and thats just my 2 cents
 

knabe

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
13,631
Location
Hollister, CA
mccannfarms said:
that quote is exaclty what makes me mad over the whole topic i mean think a person with a handfull of animals is going to have it a lot easier than say a feedlot that is going to hire extra employees just to do nais work so in no way is it gouing to drive small farmers out of buisness

this comment is incorrect.  big business is for this for the exact reason you mention.  they can spread the cost of this over far more animals.  it's gets rid of their competition, who has to spread it over fewer animals.  pretty simple economics and pretty much in every publication of cost analysis.  think cost per unit to comply, it's why large companies actually love regulation.  again, read the book or werbsite www.smallmart.org/
 

renegade

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2007
Messages
725
Location
Caldwell, Idaho
THANKS! IT DOES SOUND ALOT BETTER WHEN IT IS GIVEN THAN READ. I DID GOOD BUT MY SISTER WON WITH HER WAY COOL SPEECH ON EMINENT DOMAIN.
 
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