Temperment

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NHR

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I know that calves will usually retain the temperament of their mothers but how does this apply to ET calves? Is it the genetic mother or the birth (recip) mother that attributes to temperament? Or both?

Just curious!

Ok I noticed I mispelled Temperament!!! Read my signature line below, it explains everything. :)))
 

DL

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Temperament (IMHO) is a combo of genetics and environment - so IMHO a calm recip would provide a calm influence environmentally that is - and vice versa -
 

jason

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Here is the question, how does it play out percentage wise?  It never really could be proven, I have always though that an environment can be a stronger influence in the end.
 

Telos

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If I remember correctly in Animal Science 101, temperament is a highly heritable trait.
There was Russian study involving wild wolves and how many generations it took to domesticate them through selection.
In only a few generations of selecting for good temperament, the distant relatives of the original wild wolves were like pets.
 

renegade

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Well i know that with horses and you see it with humans too. I depends as much on how you were raised and what you were around as much as the parents and relatives. I think in this situation it is about a fifty fifty. Cattle will take up a lot from their mother and their field mates as their genetic mother.
 

justintime

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I think that temperment is a highly heritable trait. Over the years you can notice a real difference between the temperments from both sires and dams. I had herd bulls that sire very docile calves that are quieter and easier to break than those from other sires that were raised in the same pastures.

At the same time, I also think that part of any calf's temperment is developed from the enviroment in which they are raised. You can see this in herds where the owners yell and scream everytime they work the cattle. You can see this in animals that are raised in herds that have little contact with humans for extended periods of time. I have seen it in ET calves that have a goofy recip mom. A few years ago, I worked with a group of ET  Fullblood Simmental and Shorthorn heifers that had been implanted into Brahman and Brahman cross recip moms, in the southern US. The cows were completely bonkers and the calves were even worse. There were some pretty good heifers in the group from some very good donors that were extremely docile themselves, but some of these calves were killers. They would actually hunt you in the pen and put you over fences. We tried our best to domesticate these heifers and I don't think the owners were ever able to show or sell any of them, and eventually all but one was sent to a sale barn, as they were completely ruined as far as temperment is concerned.
That is why, I use my own recips whenever possible and I am pretty picky as to what the temperment of the recips is that get selected for embryos.

I have shipped some pretty good cattle  to town  just because of their temperments. When it comes right down to it, I maintain that there are enough quiet cattle on this planet to go around, and therefore we really should not have to tolerate the really goofy ones.

I have also seen several cases where a set of quiet animals, can be turned into beasts of flight by a single bad apple in the pen. Two years ago, I left a late born steer calf in with about 50 heifers for the winter. This steer was a little crazy when I weaned him, but I thought he would cool down once in with the heifers who were a very quiet bunch. The opposite happened, in that within a few weeks, the heifers were circling the pen when I went in. At first, I wondered if a neighbours dog was coming at night and riling the pen up . I also wondered if the steer was the cause, but I did not think that one animal ( and a small one at that) could do this in such a short period of time. The heifers continued to act nervous each time I entered their pen, so I loaded the steer and sent him to market. Within a few days I noticed a calmer group of heifers and within two weeks you had to almost push some out of your way to walk through the pen.
 

showcattlegal

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Well that's a really good question, I have cow that's has a bad temper and we flushed her last year her 2 et calves are lot like her not quite as bad but not fun to mess with either. The calf she had herself is they biggest baby ever. I would like to know how that worked out.
 

Joe Boy

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I think both have an affect on the calf, but believe the parents have a greater part in the genetics.  I have seen mean people have mean cattle, but I have seen cattle from a certain bull be really hard to handle.  I bout a bull and several heifers from the same show cattle breeder.  The heifers were out of a bull who had a bad disposition and his calves were all real snots....as DL calls them.  The bull on the other hand, was from a different Maine bull and all of his calves were puppies.  I bred him to some limy's and chi/angus with attitudes and all the calves were wonderful.  Personally, I think all AI bulls should have a rating for disposition.
 

JbarL

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just wondering what all bulls seem to have these temperment genes/ reputations???  ...i'm sure some of you found out the hardway and some through the grapvine.........those dont hurt as bad  :eek:    got an et bull who resembles the earlier remark  " not fun to mess "  myself....quite independent...
 

ELBEE

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Feb 7, 2007
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An old Cowboy once said that. "Disposition is 98% genetic, and 98% environment." Sounds kinda funny but I think it's true. Just think of the problems with wild cattle and wild cowboy's!
 

NHR

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Rice TX
The comments are what I expected but since I have very little experience in the ET recip process i thought I would ask. Looks like I need to find some good dispositioned females for recips. The donors our very gentle. The bulls we use for AI seem to be pretty docile also.
 

OH Breeder

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NHR,
Like you the reciep thing was new to me a couple of years ago. I had a Meyer bred reciep that came from Trans OVa, thats all I know, and she had a Dr. Who x Partisover calf. She is hard to handle and is not trust worthy. You can work her in a chute but not in a pasture. Her baby went to market at weaning becuz the thing was NUTZ. From what I have heard most Dr. Who's are pretty quiet. This little guy was a few bubbles left of center. We tried everything, leave in him the pen just sit there, put a halter on tie him up and after a month of working with him everyday nothing changed. I can't afford kids getting injured. I am wondering a whole bunch if the attitude came from the reciep......JMO..... 8)
 
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