Tip- line

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red

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This tip came from our dear Cowboy. When putting on the adhesive backs heat tags like KaMar & Estraheat(SP?)  spray a little grooming adhesive on their back first. It will really make the tags stick better.

Any other good tips or suggestions?

Red
 

shorthorns r us

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wouldn't you like to get Cowboy & JIT together and cram them into a book.  we'd have to through in DL to keep it legal with the vet stuff.  we could advertise late at night between ads for the ultimate colon cleanse & the p90x workout tapes.

 

DL

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SRU - you are a silly fella!
I use a little Kmar glue on the Estrus alert (now called Estrotec) patches...
 

shorthorns r us

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NO - just heavily medicated.

How much $$$$ could we make if we set up a service to charge for advice from u and Terry.  maybe enough to move you both to OK and be my jarrold callahan and bill couch(bob funk's guys at Express Ranches).


dragon lady said:
SRU - you are a silly fella!
I use a little Kmar glue on the Estrus alert (now called Estrotec) patches...
 

shorthorns r us

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I'll never forget the day that I heard he left Oklahoma State.  Changed my life.  All I ever wanted to do was win Louisville for a Callahan coached team.  I was a sophomore in high school and I never tried to get any better from that point on( Coach or anyone that I judged with in college, if you are a lurker, I am sorry).  I would have judged for Kim Brock had he took the job permanently but Mark Johnson didn't trip my trigger; still doesn't.

I think the folks at Ft. Worth were pretty happy with him this year.  I bet our Texas buddies can shed some light on that.


knabe said:
speaking of callahan, now there was a guy who would pick a fat steer
 

red

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LaRue, Ohio
this is for you show people/kids.
I teach my calves to back-up. This works great when getting them out of the grooming chute, fan cage & many other situations. Must be my dairy roots showing!

Red
 

knabe

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red, that is an awesome reminder.  at our local teeny show, i didnt' see one person in showmanship back up after crowding the person in front of them.  i would add to keep a little distance between you and someone lagging in front of you instead of trying to look like you are helping by twisting it's tail, especially if everyone is about ready to stand.
 

red

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well, I was thinking about it today when I was getting them out of the chute today. Really makes it nice if they are used to it. Saves messing up their grooming job by them exiting the chute easier. It isn't hard to train them, you just need to work at it. I start working w/ them on it as soon as I start breaking & teaching how to lead.

I also like to teach my calves to set into the set-up position. That way I just gradually walk them into the correct feet position. Saves a lot of stick time. We had one heifer that you rarely needed to use the stick on her. She'd walk into the position almost everytime. Yes, it takes a lot of work but I'd rather do that then to have to repeatily stick them.

Red
 

farmboy

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ive got my steer like that,,,,stops on a dime like this



(^)          (^)

                                            x judge

(^)
                (^)
                 
 

Telos

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Like the diagram FarmBoy!  Sometimes just a simple illustration can explain many things.

FarmBoy, I still say your worth the money. Maybe more then just a dime. I was wondering if you taught your calf to stop on a dime in perfect profile position when you "back" him up?  That might be worth at least a quarter.

It makes since to back a calf if it's crowding the other calf in front, that is if you're not right up on their behind. That circling around and parking them into position in some cases seems unnessasary. I guess it also depends on how close the calf behind you is.

You probably should take my advice lightly since I never, ever won a showmanship award.
 

Telos

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SRU, I think that circling around  can be overdone in some cases, but often times it's the only way to get them set up right.
 

farmboy

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it is a good diagram eh! as for backing up, its always a good skill to train to you r calf. i noticed circling has increased and i think its annoying but in some cases nescasary (sp)
 

OH Breeder

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Feb 14, 2007
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Ada, Ohio
There is a a product called Choesteral that is only sold in hair supply places, but it is cheap and can get a lot. It is kind of messy to mix, but, if you have one that has hard hair or curly hair. Get some Cholesteral, used in ethnic hair. Put good heap in a spray bottle, has crisco consistency. Fill the bottle with hot water and shake an til mixed. Then when you are done spray in and brush the calf. You can blow dry if you want. Only do it every other day. It will soften the skin and hair quickly. You must wash it out once a week or at the end of the week with mild detergant. This product helped several calves that had hard hair to train.
 

Telos

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Ohio Breeder, that sounds like a good tip. I'm pretty ignorant on all that new "hi-tech" stuff.  My generation (the dinosaur era) mostly used elbow grease, mineral oil to shine them up and Aqua Net hair spray for the tails. We boned legs with a glycerin bar. Now-a-days you could go broke buying all that hair product.

The way most of us "old timers" broke the hair was to wet the calves down and brush  the hair foreword and downword at about a 45 degree angle. Once the hair was all trained that direction you would then start brushing it foreward. You eventually end up brushing foreward at 45 degrees upward. It was about a two to three week process to getting the hair trained.

 
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