Unique Shorthorn Websites

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garybob

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I Found these 2 sites on accident. Both of these Breeding programs are "commercially-oriented", although both are on the opposite end of the spectrum, as far as mature size and BW are concerned.

www.albaughranch.com

rinkhoffagricultural.com


Hope Y'uns all have a good day. Especially Red.

GB
 

shortyjock89

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minimoo38 said:
www.albaughranch.com      1000-1150 lbs??? those cows are tiny compared to some of our 2200 lb. behemoths!!!

Yeah, they're a little smaller than ours too...but I think most ppl would say that 2200 lbs. is a little big for a cow...anyhow...really interesting websites.  They're really proud of their bulls,not sure who would buy them, but if they have buyers, more power to them.
 

garybob

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shortyjock89 said:
minimoo38 said:
www.albaughranch.com      1000-1150 lbs??? those cows are tiny compared to some of our 2200 lb. behemoths!!!

Yeah, they're a little smaller than ours too...but I think most ppl would say that 2200 lbs. is a little big for a cow...anyhow...really interesting websites.  They're really proud of their bulls,not sure who would buy them, but if they have buyers, more power to them.
"89,

The Albaugh's cows raise a Higher % of their Body Weight than "current" Shorthorn genetics. Think about it this way. When a 1150 pound cow weans a 600 pound calf, that's 52%. That's what is termed "Maternal Efficiency".
Guys, just like I have said on earlier threads, it's hard for that 1600-plus pound Cow to do the same, without Creep Feeding. I'll bet Y'alls 1800 to 2100 pound cows don't produce 30% of their Body Weight, even with "Advanced Nutrition".

I'll bet you, too, that the cows at Rinkhoff's come close to raising half their Body Weight, too. You've just got to select for it.

The key to understanding all this, is that Net Income, not Gross Income, keeps people in the Cattle Business.

I hope I've not irritated Y'uns all.

GB
 

shortyjock89

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GB, I know that you would have no way of knowing this, but I don't own a cow that comes close to 1800lbs.  My cows are in the 1100-1350 range, and they really raise some big weaning weight, high ADG calves that have a moderate yearling weight and quick finish time (usually 13 months).  

We do feed creep, but not heavily, just to get the calves used to feed.  I try to select for maternal effeciency, even though I have the means to cater to the cows, I prefer not to, and I have really no control over how the heifers that I sell are fed/treated as cows. I would much rather have a satisfied customer.  I still select for alot of show ring traits, but I am really happy with the effeciency that I have been getting out of my cows.  
 

garybob

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shortyjock89 said:
GB, I know that you would have no way of knowing this, but I don't own a cow that comes close to 1800lbs.  My cows are in the 1100-1350 range, and they really raise some big weaning weight, high ADG calves that have a moderate yearling weight and quick finish time (usually 13 months).  

We do feed creep, but not heavily, just to get the calves used to feed.  I try to select for maternal effeciency, even though I have the means to cater to the cows, I prefer not to, and I have really no control over how the heifers that I sell are fed/treated as cows. I would much rather have a satisfied customer.  I still select for alot of show ring traits, but I am really happy with the effeciency that I have been getting out of my cows.  
Oh Dude, I already kinda figured that out, going by the way you've replied to some posts on here. I am just trying to get people's attention that DO have the "behemoth" cows.

How's school going, anyway?

GB
 

shortyjock89

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Right on, man.  I don't know why some folks are stuck in the framey 80's lol.  My dad still likes a little bit bigger cow, but not me.  I need to show him those sites. He would find them interesting. 

School is going pretty good, just have been back for a month, gonna really get back into it pretty heavy this week. I hope that this semester goes a little smoother, but we'll have to see.  I can't wait until the show that we have here in the spring, I'm going to have a bunch of my friends that aren't from the farm come out and see some calves. 
 

shortyisqueen

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garybob said:
The key to understanding all this, is that Net Income, not Gross Income, keeps people in the Cattle Business.

GB

This is true. But  I could never in a million years get bulls that looked like that sold out of the pen to commercial cattlemen, no matter what their production records or carcass stats were. (And especially not for $30,000. At least one of those herds is not making all their money in the commercial cattle business, by the prices they are asking for their animals). Commercial cattlemen (in our part of the world) are still looking for the big, burly, thick, masculine yearling bulls to compete with their Simmental and Angus counterparts. They are not looking for squinty-eyed, little, puddy red dumplings and and if that's what we produce, they will be going somewhere else to buy their bulls. Which will, in turn, leave us with very little net or gross income.

There has got to be a balance between functional maternal traits, growth traits and eye appeal. The packaging is important. I find the fact that there are NO curve-bending bulls being advertised in the Shorthorn breed to be a disgrace. Its either low birthweight and no go, or big birthweight and too much go. Is it too much to ask for a happy medium?

These herds are as extremist as the show-ring-only herds, IMHO.
 

Doc

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This is true. But  I could never in a million years get bulls that looked like that sold out of the pen to commercial cattlemen, no matter what their production records or carcass stats were. (And especially not for $30,000. At least one of those herds is not making all their money in the commercial cattle business, by the prices they are asking for their animals). Commercial cattlemen (in our part of the world) are still looking for the big, burly, thick, masculine yearling bulls to compete with their Simmental and Angus counterparts. They are not looking for squinty-eyed, little, puddy red dumplings and and if that's what we produce, they will be going somewhere else to buy their bulls. Which will, in turn, leave us with very little net or gross income.

There has got to be a balance between functional maternal traits, growth traits and eye appeal. The packaging is important. I find the fact that there are NO curve-bending bulls being advertised in the Shorthorn breed to be a disgrace. Its either low birthweight and no go, or big birthweight and too much go. Is it too much to ask for a happy medium?

These herds are as extremist as the show-ring-only herds, IMHO.
[/quote]

I gotta agree SIQ. Ed Rinkoff called me one time about a cow of mine in a sale. Said he wanted to have a herd of all horned Shorthorns without any Irish breeding(which I see by his bulls he gave up on). That in itself would be a task, but to sell them IMO would be a major one. I tell you one thing, if he gets those prices for those bulls I will ship my whole herd up there for him to disperse for me.  ;D
 

aj

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western kansas
I get so tickled to have purebred people explain to me what the commercial people want sometimes. They don't evn know what commercial is. They talk down down to commercial people.I love in a sale catalog when they say something lke "this bull would work in a commercial operation(since he's not good enough for registered). What the heck does that mean. I know alot of commercial cowmen that will buy a 5000 $ bull and breed him to 60 cows a year for 5 years. The commercial industry is the industry. Last I knew Texas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Kansas were the top 4 beef cow calf states in the industry. I really don't need someone from the Kentucky area explaining to me what the commercial industry needs. GB.. I am running my weaned heifer calf replacements on cornstalks this morning in a -20 windchill condition. That would probably kill the show cattle type. I realize that different enviroments call for different cattle. I have heard of cattle being run in the swamps of Florida that have to fight mosquito's and stuff like that. Anyway gb I am still mad about Missouri's raid on kansas in the civil war but youare allright.
 

Jill

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We aren't a commercial operation, but I can guarantee you you won't see many of those dudes running in the Flint Hills. 
I did mark the website as a favorite, love the old barns for sale.
 
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