What are some of you favorite cattle terms?

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red

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We have many descriptive terms that are used in the cattle/club business. Are there some that you really like? Is there one that you've hear used & you've wondered what it meant?  ???
Like a while back I asked what stiffled meant in a bull.
One of my favorite terms is "soggy". I just love the way it's used to describe a cow. My hubby argued w/ me that being soggy wasn't a good thing. We have a lot of interesting discussion! ::)
What terms do you use for cattle that you really like? Or don't like for that matter?

Red (not soggy)
 

justme

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I went to Ohio state ATI and majored in Beef  '89-91 and we had a guy named Jim Watson that was a stone's throw from being a Hillbilly.  We'd run cows thru the shoot and that guy would spit and yell "burn'em" !  This northern Ohio girl had no clue what he meant lol.  Even after the accent lol.  Finally Joel Litt (after he quit laughing at me) told me to let the cow out of the shoot.  Humor for you all today!  As Red would say....Brain Fart I can smell it!
 

knabe

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heavy footed, free moving, front doesn't move in unison with the back, stepping under her belly, steps under her weight nicely, walks in the same tracks, nice suspension, i'd like to see more in her brisket, ................ capacious , i like the way her scapula lays down,

counter intuitive
freaky, goose fronted, by the way kit pharo doesn't like these kind, too many dairy qualities

http://www.bovineengineering.com/linear_female.html
not sure why the measuring stick needs to be so expensive

would like to see more reasons by judges, particularly the later stages when all groups combined.
 

red

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Yes, freaky fronted is also a good term! Always wondered if that was a good thing or not? :p

(welcome)

Red
 

cowz

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red said:
We have many descriptive terms that are used in the cattle/club business. Are there some that you really like? Is there one that you've hear used & you've wondered what it meant?  ???
Like a while back I asked what stiffled meant in a bull.
One of my favorite terms is "soggy". I just love the way it's used to describe a cow. My hubby argued w/ me that being soggy wasn't a good thing. We have a lot of interesting discussion! ::)
What terms do you use for cattle that you really like? Or don't like for that matter?

Red (not soggy)

In my part of the world "SOGGY" is a positive way to describe a set of cattle.  At a sale barn the auctioneer could say....  Now thats one soggy set of steers.  This means that they are deep and have a lot of meat in them.  Not 'sucked up" or "Hard Doing".
 

austin

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I'd think soggy as the opposite.

....overweight, distorted, opposite of in shape,  not muscular
 

Showcalves

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We were at a show early this spring and needed a 4th member for our senior judging team.  Our senior member of the team had a friend with him.  Poor kid had never judged cattle in his life.  I told him, "You want a pretty looking heifer but not like you think of girls as pretty.  Think big buts, lots spring of rib and can walk nicely.  Not exactly what you want in a girlfriend."  He laughed and the buddy on the judging team said, "What's wrong with girls like that?"  I about died trying not to laugh at them.

Melinda
 

garybob

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Watch it! First of all, what's wrong with Hillbillies? There are more brood cows per square mile in " backward" places like Kentucky, Arkansas, Southern Missouri, etc., than, let's say the Corn belt States or the Plains' States ...Like it, or not, we have more grass and a better climate.Perhaps this guy enrolled in school with you guys to LEARN something, and to take it back to his community or family operation. Yes, I, too, am a "hillbilly". Bank on it!

Jug-headed, raw-boned, hard-doin', and Pencil-butted are some of my favorite terms to describe outlier cattle.


We had a genuine, sale-barn auctioneer, ( Roy Cain), who would keep the weekly sale livelier than some purebred Events I've attended. He would say "The chalk draws 'em" whenever a good, uniform set of calves entered the ring.This was his way of ID'ing the right type and kind, whatever the trend happened to be at the time.
 

red

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Garybob, I'm sending you one of my patented "chill pills"
Maybe his name was Billy Hill?

Red ;D
 

red

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We will use a name of a really bad animal that we've had over the years to decribe our cattle. It's more of a family joke but we all get it. For example, we had a black & white bull we named Willie. He was patterned sort of like the killer whale in the movie. Horrible looking thing, leggy, hunched back, peaked butted & luckily never could figure out how to bred a cow. The guys since then have called anything that resembles him a "willie". Also have some heifers the we will call "Mabels". Pretty much the same story, horrible heifer & really mean.
Poor Willie, I decided I wanted to learn how to slick shear- so I practiced on him. Ended up slick shearing only half of him. The guys said he went to the feedlot embarassed how he looked & never could gain much weight. :'(  I guess we could have called him Slick Willy if I had finished the job! (clapping)

Red (clapping)

 

justme

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Sorry to offend any Hillbillies....not my intention.  At school we use to laugh that the guys near the Ohio River were a stones throw away from being a Hillbilly.  I was meaning his accent ect.  I use to Live in Kentucky and manage Penn's Polled Herefords so I know there are good cattle there.  It was meant to be funny.  Heck I even said I had a brain fart!
 

Joe Boy

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"sold"
"soft"
"fine"

"hanging on a rail" is not one of mine...... I have heard it used too many times by judges that had no idea what an animal on the rail should look like...

basically it is a beauty contest... so it is like judging a girl for a friend....  if she smiles a lot and has a good disposition boys it will last longer than the spring in the ribs or the studded bellly button....... longevity is a word judges need to use....... how she travels and how her frame is meant for motherhood is part of longevity.....  I think picking (judging) a cow to take home with you is a lot like judging the woman to spend 40-50 years with......  you have to look past the paint and the hair do.....

I guess that is why when CB's were the thing I was the "Texas Hillbilly"
 

OH Breeder

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Red,
This is an easy one. Remember- Ground Sow, Sow bellied, Tank
When we get one that is really nasty ....the [email protected]#%H about ate me or she will eat you up...have you for breakfast
Whistle front, Freaky front  along with that, those "who Made Who front ends"
Buck Knee'd, splay footed, points to the poles
get one that is "squirrel-ly"
 

cowz

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deep said:
  "On their wheels"
  That's my favorite

(dog)

I like that one.  I also like "fills his track" to describe soundness.  I also like "spring of rib" and "high capacity". (cow)
 

shortdawg

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I hate the term " Hard Doing " .  My favorite term is definitely feminine ; I want my girls to look like girls. Freaky Fronted, Soggy, Easy Fleshing, SOUND, and Smooth Shouldered are also some I like.
 

genes

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You guys on this thread pinpointed why I DON'T like the term soggy.  I haven't heard it used very consistently at all, and it's not all that specific.  I much prefer something like easy fleshing if that's what you mean.  I like the wheels one.  I don't know...it's not generally the terms I have a problem with when I hear something I don't like (or vice versa).  It's a matter of the judge using them properly, being clear in what they are talking about and really giving reasons on a class.  I hate when they give basically the exact same ones for every class of the day.  And not to fond of when they make up their own words and don't explain them ever.  My Dad's favorite term to use is pointy a$$ed (as in narrow between the pins...the curse of many an angus), but that's just for us at home....not official judging cards.  :D

Now here's  one for you though...why are calf kneed (aka back at the knee) and cow hocked (toes out, hocks in) called that?  The terms are used in multiple species, yet I don't think I've ever seen a calf kneed calf, and I would without a doubt say that there are more cow-hocked horses than cows.  But nooo, horses are so precious, we would never call it horse hocked  ;D  (and disclaimer I'm not horse bashing...I love the beasts....but it's true)
 

red

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"stamping them out" when they talk about a bull or cow that is consistant.
Or once a judge said our heifer would roll down hills. I guess he didn't like her walk.

Red
 
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